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  • Google says it will stop selling ads based on people’s browsing histories

    Home Forums Code Red – Security/Privacy advisories Google says it will stop selling ads based on people’s browsing histories

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      • #2347791
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Google says it will stop selling ads based on people’s browsing histories and tracking users across the internet – though the new policy doesn’t include mobile apps

        Google announced the dramatic advertising changes on Wednesday
        It said it will stop using and investing in technologies that track users on its Chrome browsers as they move from site to site by next year
        Google has been working on proposals to remove so-called third party cookies from its Chrome browser since early last year
        Third-party cookies, which have enabled online ads for decades, have been a longstanding source of privacy concerns
        Google will still be able to track users itself through data collected from its services like Search, Maps and YouTube
        The company said the changes apply only to ad tools and unique identifiers for websites, not for mobile apps ..

      • #2347803
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        I do wonder: Is this new development to take effect world-wide or only in the UK? (The article is in the Web site of the “Daily Mail”, a UK tabloid.)

        Be that as it may, two further excerpts from the same article linked by Alex:

        In December Apple announced an upcoming iOS update that will require users to give permission in order for apps to track them for advertising purposes – a move that critics said would cripple small businesses.

        While Google noted that its latest changes will not affect apps, experts predict that apps will be involved in the overhaul going forward

        Does the second excerpt refers only to Google’ own “apps” in Chrome, YouTube, Maps, etc?

        As to the first excerpt:

        For more than three hundred years in what is now the USA, printed newspapers and newsletters have relied on advertisements not targeted to specific readers and even so, the advertisers have found them useful to promote their business and attract more customers. Each one of us might derive one’s own conclusions from this fact:

        https://www.theclassroom.com/history-of-newspaper-ads-13636202.html

        Excerpt:

        The first continuously published newspaper in America was the Boston News-Letter; the first issue was distributed by John Campbell on April 24, 1704 and continues to this day. The first paid newspaper advertisement was an announcement selling real estate on Oyster Bay, Long island on May 8, 1704 and read verbatim:

        “At Oyster-bay on Long-Island in the Province of N.York, There is a very good Fulling-Mill, to be Let or Sold, as also a Plantation, having on it a large new Brick house, and another good house by it for a Kitchin & work house, with a Barn, Stable, etc. a young Orchard, and 20 Acres clear Land. The Mill is to be Let with or without the Plantation: Enquire of Mr. William Bradford Printer in N.York, and know further.”

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

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        • #2347809
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          Oscar, quoting Alex, quoting DM:

          “In December Apple announced an upcoming iOS update that will require users to give permission in order for apps to track them for advertising purposes – a move that critics said would cripple small businesses.”

          Small businesses like Google, Amazon, and Facebook?

          What small businesses are there that broker internet ads these days? The giants have swallowed all of the smaller fish in the pond.

          Perhaps the small businesses to which they refer are the advertisers themselves. If we set aside the obvious, that most of the ads are quite clearly from huge corporations and not small businesses, it still doesn’t pass the sniff test.

          Non-targeted ads, as the various articles on the topic reveal, cost considerably less than those that are supposedly sent straight to the most receptive audiences. The small businesses that may have bought a certain number of targeted ads will be able to afford a greater number of ads with a more generic level of targeting, like in the olden days how they would put computer ads in computer magazines.

          In all likelihood, it won’t be small businesses that are “crippled” by the new rules. It will be the data-slurping giants who are somewhat inconvenienced by the inability to profit from data that do not belong to them. They won’t be crippled, nor will they stop making piles of money.

          It’s funny how the web advertisers have managed to change the definition of advertising to include tracking in such a short time. Advertising has been around forever, as you note. It’s only been for a small bit of that time that it has been possible to perform the kind of tracking that they are now claiming is intrinsic to the very definition of advertising!

           

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.21.4 User Edition)

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        • #2347816
          Cybertooth
          AskWoody Plus

          I do wonder: Is this new development to take effect world-wide or only in the UK?

          It appears to be a worldwide policy. The Daily Mail article mentions no exceptions to where the policy change applies (UK vs. ex-UK), nor does the Google post that’s linked to in the article.

          Maybe research like the one reported on here had something to do with Google’s changes. Paying more than twice as much for a 4% increase in revenue doesn’t sound like a viable advertising strategy.

           

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          • #2347822
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Cybertooth, in the Wall Street Journal’s article you have linked, I find quite interesting this summation of the situation by someone who has worked on digital advertising at a mayor newspaper:

            Michael Zimbalist, the chief strategy and innovation officer at Philadelphia Media Network LLC who previously spent a decade working in digital advertising at New York Times , argues the value of behavioral advertising to publishers was always misrepresented.

            “Behavioral targeting has been completely overhyped in its value for publishers from the day it was first invented,” he said.

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

            • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by OscarCP.
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