• Got a cell phone? Are you getting more spam calls?

    Home » Forums » Newsletter and Homepage topics » Got a cell phone? Are you getting more spam calls?

    Author
    Topic
    #2466838

    Even though “supposedly” the industry is trying to clamp down on spam calls, I get more, not less. Lately I’ve received calls where clearly the spam t
    [See the full post at: Got a cell phone? Are you getting more spam calls?]

    Susan Bradley Patch Lady

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    Viewing 19 reply threads
    Author
    Replies
    • #2466850

      I get none but my AIO printer/fax does 🙂

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2466865

      Android12 & Samsungs AntiSpam-Service works great.

      ∅spam, and servicing  people like healthcare and government and normal businesses are put through with a notice who is calling. So never again a lost call that was forwarded to voicemail. No need to make the addressbook inmense big.

      I can imaging that the mobile-telephone-service provider may be leading in this feature; that remains a question to me.

      * Is this a fact: "foreignpolicy.com/2022/04/25/the-real-threat-to-social-media-is-europe", Really? * get out of the poisonous Metaverse *
      • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by Fred.
    • #2466872

      I have an iPhone and was using the feature to block calls from people not in my contacts list.  It works great, but with unintended consequences.  The result is I’ve decided to not use this feature.  If you are waiting for a call from someone you haven’t heard from before and have forgotten (like I have) that you have this feature enabled you won’t hear the phone call and will (maybe) discover a voice mail later.  Recently my son was in for surgery and they told me that I needed to wait and that they’d call me when I could come see him.  Well, you guessed it.. I never got the call sitting outside in my car.  It wasn’t until I picked up my phone that I saw the missed calls and by then they were already calling my home looking for me.  There were other calls I missed too but this was the most significant side effect that I’m sharing.  My fault for forgetting I had the feature turned on.  Yes but after a few weeks you do forget it is on.

      • #2466886

        I had the similar experience with the iPhone silence unknown callers function and I too had to turn it off and hope the carriers are going to start blocking them. Now I look at where the call’s coming from to decide if to answer or not, so I still answer some spam calls.

        I do use the anti-spam function for text messages and set the filtering for known and unknown senders.

        Dana:))

    • #2466900

      I too cannot restrict calls by contact list members. Medical providers often have telephone systems that use out going numbers different from numbers for in going calls. And often there are multiple possible choices.

      Recently I had a very difficult problem. Someone called several medical health insurance brokers for quotes and used my number. I had a flood of calls from several businesses. In at least one case the same business kept changing the area code and number. Only one business left a message including a method to have my number deleted from their system.

      I finally answered one, spoke to a live person, took their name and then informed them they were harassing me with multiple calls per hour but I was glad I had a name to use when I sue the business for harassment. There was a quick click and that was the last call.

    • #2466904

      I think the phone spammers who speak in Chinese have stolen the phone number of my Chinese laundry guy.

    • #2466905

      Does anyone actually do business with spam callers?

      It would seem to be a simple solution that if everyone would just stop buying from them, they will have to stop calling… sigh…

      • #2466909

        I agree who is falling for these scams and are the bad guys actually making any money??? Now that being said, I believe there are certain people who are vulnerable – such as the elderly. They do fall victim easily. But I wonder is that enough to keep all these bad guys going?? Donna

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2466918

      I don’t have my iPhone blocking calls.  So, I do get a number of calls that ATT has decided it is a “Spam Risk” and I ignore it.  Other calls with numbers that I don’t recognize are ignored.

      I recently helped a friend with some out-patient surgery where they required a driver be present to release her.  Because I don’t pick up unknown calls, I had the facility tell me their phone number and I entered it in my phone.  I then received the ‘take her home’ call and everything went smoothly.

      If I get an unknown call, I figure that if its important, there will be voice mail left and I then return the call.  If it’s someone important, then I enter them in my contacts.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2466923

      I agree who is falling for these scams and are the bad guys actually making any money??? Now that being said, I believe there are certain people who are vulnerable – such as the elderly. They do fall victim easily. But I wonder is that enough to keep all these bad guys going?? Donna

      Look up Jim Browning on youtube and watch some of his videos.. You’ll see just how many people they DO manage to scam (nearly all elderly), and how much money they make.
      Many of these elderly are boomers with literally millions sat in a single bank account. These scammers mostly live overseas in India and regularly scam hundreds of thousands of dollars per day. They have designer suits, flash cars, fancy hotels & holidays etc, and that’s just the low level ones! Remember dollars go FAR in India. The call centres are massive with huge office floors full of scammers.

      The owners have a huge organised crime business going, with many scam call centres all linked up and collaborating. What was surprising is that there’s often an American or two that set the whole thing up from the start, too..

      Regarding the dead air / hang-up calls, that’s due to there not being enough Indians in the call centre to actually answer the call. For the outgoing calls their dialer software just spams every number it can on whatever list of numbers they’ve purchased, then it routes it through (sometimes countries) to the call centre for someone to answer. As they’re just hoping for a “bite”, they have more calls ongoing than people to answer them.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2466930

        Thanks Bob – I’m not naive but, it’s really distressing to know that so many of the vulnerable elderly are being scammed. It’s not just criminal, it’s sinful!!  And you know, one day, Lord willing, we will all be elderly and more vulnerable. I’m not there yet (61), but we’ll see how well I do with the scams of my age!!   I know not everyone will fall victim and hope I never do!  But there are way too many organized online criminal operations these days, (hackers, scammers, etc.) Who knows what they will think of next to separate people from their money??? : (

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2466928

      I do not have an iPhone. But, previously Apple had another feature that blocked unknown callers.

      https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT207099

      What is the difference in these two features? Asking for a friend 🙂

      Get up to speed on router security at RouterSecurity.org and Defensive Computing at DefensiveComputingChecklist.com

    • #2466929

      Oh, and advice for people who really have no clue about technology

      https://defensivecomputingchecklist.com/rulesoftheroad.php

       

       

      Get up to speed on router security at RouterSecurity.org and Defensive Computing at DefensiveComputingChecklist.com

    • #2466934

      I do not have an iPhone. But, previously Apple had another feature that blocked unknown callers.

      https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT207099

      What is the difference in these two features? Asking for a friend 🙂

      That is exactly what Susan wrote “block unknown callers not on contact list”.
      After receiving a spam call you can block the caller, you can also block spam messages from a senders…

    • #2467004

      Simple solution is to wait 2 or 3 seconds before saying “Hello”. Spammers have software that listens for you to answer and then it connects you to a person or a recorded message plays. If you wait you will be rewarded with a satisfying click as their system hangs up, it may even mark your number as not worth calling again. This is why they never leave a voice mail. A real caller will wait longer than this for you to answer.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2467031

      I generally get the same spammer who calls about once a week. The phone call and spammer are ignored. That’s it. No party. No answer. Nothing to see. Move along. Move along.

      The phone is for my convenience.

      Carpe Diem {with backup and coffee}
      offline▸ Win10Pro 2004.19041.572 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox83.0b3 WindowsDefender WuMgr
      offline▸ Acer AspireOne Atom N270 RAM2GB HDD GuineaPig
      online▸ Win11Pro 21H2.22000.856 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox104.0b8 MicrosoftDefender WuMgr
    • #2467041

      I have a Samsung Galaxy S21, and in the last several weeks the frequency of spam calls has decreased noticeably.  My phone will alert with “Possible Spam” or “Potential Spam” when I get a spam call.  I swipe right, pause a second, then hang up and tap the “∅” button to block all future calls/messages from that number.  I do the same for numbers that I don’t recognize for which caller ID is not displayed.

      I swipe right to indicate “Yes, this is a working number”

      I hang up immediately to indicate “No, you can’t talk to a human”

      Lately, I may go a day or two without a spam call.

       

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
      We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do. We don't all have to do the same things.

    • #2467108

      I’ve got a 4G “flip phone” that I keep in my dresser drawer 98% of the time.  I have it mainly to take with me when I go out, mostly for emergency use.  It stays turned off 99% of the time.  Which brings me to the point/fact that on three occasions when I did turn it on (to check the battery level) a spam message came up.  I haven’t given my cell phone number to anyone, and the phone was on less than five minutes!

      Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

    • #2467117

      I’ve got a 4G “flip phone” that I keep in my dresser drawer 98% of the time.  I have it mainly to take with me when I go out, mostly for emergency use.  It stays turned off 99% of the time.  Which brings me to the point/fact that on three occasions when I did turn it on (to check the battery level) a spam message came up.  I haven’t given my cell phone number to anyone, and the phone was on less than five minutes!

      The spammers are probably just using the list of number ranges assigned to your local 4G carrier, without actually knowing which numbers are assigned.

      Those number ranges are public information and easily obtained.

      As to why the SMS text messages popped up when you turned the phone on, they are asynchronous, and get queued up for the next time your mobile device is available “online” for message delivery.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2467124

      I receive many spam calls but most are in the spam folder. Same for SMS. They always use a different phone number which looks like a local number but I suspect they can spoof Caller ID.

    • #2467150

      I have a landline, and I am getting fewer spam calls than a year ago, when there were several a day.

      I also have a cell-phone that I keep mostly off and when I need to turn it on, I ignore all calls awaiting reply there, assuming these to be all spam, because I use it only in emergencies and in other very special circumstances, so very few people know my cell-phone number and everyone that knows me also knows better than to call me there, but to use email or call me on my land-line instead.

      So I have no idea of how many spam calls I am getting in my cell-phone these days, but I assume that all calls awaiting reply there are spam. So far, with no ill effects after years of doing things this way. I have been a no-regular-cell-phone-user since they first became popular, in the early 1990s, when I declared their like to be a bane on humanity, a position I still maintain.

      Ex-Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7); since mid-2017 using also macOS. Presently on Monterey 12.15 & sometimes running also Linux (Mint).

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2467177

      I have been a no-regular-cell-phone-user since they first became popular, in the early 1990s, when I declared their like to be a bane on humanity, a position I still maintain.

      I respect that position, especially since the advent of smart phones, vs. the old school mobile phones.

      In the 90’s I was required to carry a company issued Motorola bag phone for nights and weekends for on-call duties related to my IT role. Later on it was a Motorola flip phone. Cell phone technology gradually made pagers irrelevant.

      So I suppose I was eventually conditioned to accept cell phones for staying in touch with work when away from the office, and then by extension, realized the convenience of staying in touch with family and friends while on the go. So I signed up for a cellular plan as soon as it was affordable. But that was in the early days, when folks still answered their phones, LOL!!!

      Times have definitely changed since then!!!

      Motorola bag phone image: Motorola-bag-phone

      • #2467308

        Motorola bag phone

        … was my first cell phone in the ’90’s.  Cell towers were few and far between, but that bag phone had awesome range.  If I’m not mistaken, the signal strength was rated 5 Watts.

        Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
        We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do. We don't all have to do the same things.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2467318

          With that power it’s a good thing that one didn’t need to hold that antenna next to the head while transmitting!

        • #2467354

          With that power it’s a good thing that one didn’t need to hold that antenna next to the head while transmitting!

          It was only 3 watts; “Motorola introduced the Bag Phone line in 1988. These phones offered more durability and higher power output (up to 3 watts) than more conventional cell phones of the time, such as Motorola’s own DynaTAC and MicroTAC handheld phones, making them popular for truckers, boaters, and people in rural areas. Because of their durability, many examples of these phones are still in working order today.”

          Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
          We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do. We don't all have to do the same things.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2467252

      Man, that brings back memories!

      Never got stuck with one of those, but did have to keep a Motorola pager (i.e. “electronic dog leash“) within 3 feet for a whole week while on standby alert.

      Thankfully, that was “usually” only once ever 8 weeks (depending on the availability of the other 7 people who shared that responsibility with me.)

    Viewing 19 reply threads
    Reply To: Got a cell phone? Are you getting more spam calls?

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use all available BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

    Your information: