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  • Hacked Petrol Pumps

    Home Forums Code Red – Security/Privacy advisories Hacked Petrol Pumps

    This topic contains 17 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  mn– 5 days, 14 hours ago.

    • Author
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    • #2011217 Reply

      Kirsty
      Da Boss

      Hidden Cam Above Bluetooth Pump Skimmer

      By Brian Krebs | November 25, 2019

       
      Tiny hidden spy cameras are a common sight at ATMs that have been tampered with by crooks who specialize in retrofitting the machines with card skimmers. But until this past week I’d never heard of hidden cameras being used at gas pumps in tandem with Bluetooth-based card skimming devices.

      Apparently, I’m not alone.

      Whoever hacked this fuel pump was able to get inside the machine and install a Bluetooth-based circuit board that connects to the power and can transmit stolen card data wirelessly. This allows the thieves to drive by at any time and download the card data remotely from a mobile device or laptop.

       
      Read the full article here

    • #2011400 Reply

      MrJimPhelps
      AskWoody_MVP

      My wife’s card got hacked once at a very popular gas station. The bank caught it immediately and called her.

      Needless to say, we don’t shop at that particular gas station anymore. Sad, because they always have the lowest price.

      I always choose “credit” rather than “debit”, because if you choose debit, they will probably put a hold on $75 on your bank account. With credit, there is never a hold. Now I have an additional good reason for choosing credit – I won’t have to enter my PIN when making the purchase.

      Group "L" (Linux Mint)
      with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
      • #2011433 Reply

        Kirsty
        Da Boss

        In many countries, PIN entry is required for credit card payment at an EFTPOS terminal (where signatures have been phased out over many years).

      • #2012760 Reply

        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        Debit cards (in the USA) are a poor choice for anyone with half way decent credit. Stay FAR away.

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        • #2012858 Reply

          GoneToPlaid
          AskWoody Plus

          Perhaps not so. I deliberately use debit cards which are associated with accounts with limited funds. At gas pumps, I run them as credit, which requires me to enter my billing zip code instead of a PIN. After I make my purchase, I instantly get a text message and an email alert from my bank about when, where, and the amount of the purchase. Debit cards always have much lower daily credit, versus the available credit on a credit card.

          On the other hand and with most credit cards, the only thing I get are emails that the card was used to make purchases. I then have to log into my banking in order to see the charges.

          The upshot is that I have turned on every possible alert and security feature which my banking institutions offer, including creating both verbal passwords and agreeing to voice recognition.

          I also disabled any charges for any of my cards which were made from abroad, and I only enable this when I am about to travel abroad.

          • #2013039 Reply

            wavy
            AskWoody Plus

            I deliberately use debit cards which are associated with accounts with limited funds

            With that arrangement one must have an alternative payment method (another debit card perhaps) because (as I have read) it is common for more funds totally more than the transaction to be put on ‘hold’. And credits cards offer better minimum protections. But if it works for you.. 😉

            🍻

            Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
            • #2014055 Reply

              mn–
              AskWoody Lounger

              Over here, with debit cards the pump asks you how much to hold… and also they normally release the hold right after you’re done if the network connection hasn’t gone down while you were at it.

              not particularly thirsty and its tank capacity is… … enough for some 180 miles

              I’d say that’s either an underspecced tank or a very thirsty car.

              Why yes, back when I was that age, one of the first repairs done to “my” car was to replace the fuel tank with a bigger one.

      • #2012887 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        And with credit cards, one can always protest the charge after the fact, particularly a fraudulent one, as long is within 60 days of the questioned payment. With debit cards, once one pays with one of these, the payment money is taken from one’s bank account and goes directly and immediately into the fraudster’s pockets… and it’s gone, baby, gone.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W + Mac&Lx

    • #2011769 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      Needless to say, we don’t shop at that particular gas station anymore

      It’s probably now a very safe place to shop as the police will have visited to identify the fraudster, so they will be very careful.

      cheers, Paul

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2012871 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I always have paid with cash (a.k.a. greenbacks in these parts) wherever I go, anywhere in the country and even abroad (in the local currency). When driving locally in it, my own car is not particularly thirsty and its tank capacity is some 8.5 gallons, enough for some 180 miles, which can last me a couple of weeks, given my driving needs (I can and often do telecommute). Even when gasoline has been expensive in recent years, the cost of filling the empty tank completely (something better avoided in practice) has been no much more than 40 US$ (more in Europe, of course) so it is possible for me to carry enough ready cash for that (I normally carry more, just not in my back pocket…)

      So, gasoline pump hackers: hack this! I say.

      This works and will continue to work, until the world goes crazy enough to switch from using paper cash to using plastic for everything, everywhere.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W + Mac&Lx

      • #2013040 Reply

        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        Of course that last gallon takes a minute because of the metering system. Call me impatient but a CC is faster and I am less likely to get bumped on the head for flashing a wad around.

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2013125 Reply

        MW
        AskWoody Plus

        I’m the same way.  Cash and carry for me.  I mostly use a credit card for online purchases.  Not too often do I use one in a brick and morter store.

        You can’t hack a Federal Reserve Note.

        W7 & W8.1 - Group W (since April 2017)
        Mac Sierra & Mojave - Group A
        Mint Cinnamon - Group A

    • #2012895 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      8.5 gallons, enough for some 180 miles

      21mpg is terrible. I get over twice that and I’m still not happy.  🙂

      cheers, Paul

      • #2012904 Reply

        Kirsty
        Da Boss

        Don’t forget US vs. UK gallons differ! 😉

      • #2013102 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Paul-T: In gallons or liters, as an argument, the use of mpg or l/100 km is not a very good one here. Because it all depends on how many miles — or kilometers — one actually drives. At my age, the place where I live (near where I work, shop, have my mechanic’s, pharmacy, doctor and dentist), and my position in life, that distance is far below average (and I am glad it is, as I never much liked driving cars). Which just goes to show that using the mph as measure is not a good way to figure out either the carbon footprint or the expenses incurred using a particular vehicle. It makes sense only when discussing significant numbers of vehicles, whole fleets of them.

        cheers, Oscar

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W + Mac&Lx

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2012907 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      Thanks to Kirsty the correct conversion is 11.2l/100km. Still terrible!

      cheers, Paul

      • #2013122 Reply

        samak
        AskWoody Plus

        Not so bad if most of the time it is only being used for short trips around town. If it included much highway driving then it’s not good.

        W7 SP1 Home Premium 64-bit, Office 2010, Group B, non-techie

    • #2013979 Reply

      Using your bank’s ATM chip-and-pin card and shielding your PIN is pretty safe, or so says Clark Howard (https://clark.com/). Some merchants hate this, but too bad.

      The guy says that ATM chip-and-PIN cards put you at less risk that a debit card w/Visa/Mastercard logos on it, as it takes longer and is more hassle to get your dough back. He hates the things.

      Personally, I pay cash, PayPal, or write a check for really big stuff. I don’t use a credit card any more, since the Equifax hack really took me to town.

      “No, I am NOT John J. Jinksenhiemer Smith, and I was never in Nacogdoches, Texas, and I did NOT buy a Corvette!!”

      Win7 Pro SP1 64-bit, Dell Latitude E6330, Intel CORE i5 "Ivy Bridge", Group "Wait for the all-clear", Multiple Air-Gapped backup drives in different locations, "Don't check for updates-Full Manual Mode."
      --
      "...All the people, all the time..." (Peter Ustinov ad-lib from "Logan's Run")

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