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  • Here’s how to hide KB 4023057 – and any other Win10 updates you don’t want

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Here’s how to hide KB 4023057 – and any other Win10 updates you don’t want

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      • #239486 Reply
        woody
        Da Boss

        From @PKCano – I hid the updates using wushowhide, but they installed anyway. If you have ever experienced this, here is an explanation and a way to a
        [See the full post at: Here’s how to hide KB 4023057 – and any other Win10 updates you don’t want]

        8 users thanked author for this post.
      • #239498 Reply
        GreatAndPowerfulTech
        AskWoody Plus

        Things with Windows are simply nuts when we have to jump through hoops, like the procedure described, to make sure our computers won’t get borked from an update.

        GreatAndPowerfulTech

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #239501 Reply
          zero2dash
          AskWoody Lounger

          I treat Win10 from the Group A perspective and I’ve had no issues after installing this update. Obviously no warranty implied, YMMV.

          Selectively choosing updates in Win10 goes above and beyond and is more akin to Group B (or a new Group, if we’re being honest). I defer feature updates for 120 days and quality updates for 14 days and for 3 versions now (1703, 1709, and now 1803) my Win10 boxes have remained rock solid stable in Group A.

      • #239507 Reply
        Chronocidal Guy
        AskWoody Lounger

        A sobering thought to ponder… imagine if any of the other things we turn on and off over the course of the day were as complicated as this.

        Lightswitches… heating/cooling… car ignitions… appliances… You could spend hours a day ensuring that the thing you thought you turned off was actually off.

        About the only thing I can think of where this would be a positive would be alarm clocks. The mental exertion and frustration to turn off a Windows-powered alarm clock would probably do a good job to ensure you couldn’t go back to sleep.

         

         

         

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #239522 Reply
        dhdoyle
        AskWoody Plus

        Howdy! For the last several months, I have been trying an alternative way of updating Windows 10 on my home computers. Here’s what I have been doing:

        1. I’m keeping Windows update completely shut down.
        2. I make a disc image.
        3. I run Belarc Advisor to show me missing updates.
        4. I double-check the advisability of installing them.
        5. I use Belarc’s provided links to download the stand-alone updates.
        6. I manually install the files.

        I like this because I have control of the update process. The down sides I have found so far are that:

        • It’s not a background process and it requires my attention.
        • an occasional install aborts because it isn’t applicable to my system.

        YMMV.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #239519 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        You can use WUShowHide while metered connection is still set to on to hide updates.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #239524 Reply
        geekdom
        AskWoody Plus

        Updates (and avoidance) shouldn’t be this hard. Really.

        G{ot backup} TestBeta
        offline▸ Win10Pro 2004.19041.572 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox83.0b3
        online▸ Win10Pro 2004.19041.572 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox83.0b6 WindowsDefender
        TargetReleaseVersion=1909
        WUMgr
      • #239542 Reply
        Lars220
        AskWoody Lounger

        Hoops-Procedure-13

        Attachments:
        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #239553 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Or…
        Continue using Windows 7 SP1 set to Never Check For Updates…
        – Everything still works
        – The Start Menu is included
        – Solid, stable, and mature product that doesn’t need any real fixing
        – You’ll be part of the group who can actually use their computers after each patch cycle to go to askwoody.com and read about how the other people using Windows 10 were just incapacitated yet again, and marvel at the hoops they’ll need to be jumping through in the distant hope of getting their computer working properly again!

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #239580 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        That’s an absurd amount of fiddling around. My old 1709 Home installation didn’t install anything automatically immediately except Defender updates. I think it would install quality updates eventually, but I usually manually patched it before then by downloading from the MS update catalog. Yeah, basically ideal behavior, right? As far as I remember, my settings were:

        I. Metered Ethernet, always left to metered. I had to do some registry stuff to get the permissions to set this, since it seems Microsoft hid the settings for Metering the Ethernet. Here’s two reg commands that will meter Ethernet and Wifi, respectively. Change the “/d 2” part to “/d 1” without quotes to undo it–but why would you? You might need to get permission in the registry editor (or use regini) first for the ethernet one. I had to.

        reg add “HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\NetworkList\DefaultMediaCost” /v Ethernet /t REG_DWORD /d 2 /f
        reg add “HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\NetworkList\DefaultMediaCost” /v WiFi /t REG_DWORD /d 2 /f

        II. Set the update deferral stuff in the registry. Home doesn’t offer the settings (Pro and above do) but it appears to honor them **UNLESS YOU HIT CHECK FOR UPDATES** Here’s six reg commands that do it. The first command sets the branch readiness level to the more deferred one, whatever they’re calling it now. The 2nd and 3rd reg commands defer feature updates by a year. 4th and 5th defer quality (bugfix) updates by two weeks. The 6th one will prevent automatic driver installation if Microsoft still honors it. Who knows anymore? Windows Update is like Calvinball at this point.

        reg add “HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate” /v “BranchReadinessLevel” /d 32 /t REG_DWORD /f
        reg add “HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate” /v “DeferFeatureUpdates” /d 1 /t REG_DWORD /f
        reg add “HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate” /v “DeferFeatureUpdatesPeriodInDays” /d 365 /t REG_DWORD /f
        reg add “HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate” /v “DeferQualityUpdates” /d 1 /t REG_DWORD /f
        reg add “HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate” /v “DeferQualityUpdatesPeriodInDays” /d 14 /t REG_DWORD /f
        reg add “HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate” /v “ExcludeWUDriversInQualityUpdate” /d 1 /t REG_DWORD /f

        *Note: You need windows 10 1703 or higher to defer for a year. Versions older can only defer for 180 days. You also need Windows 1607 or later for the 1st one (BranchReadinessLevel) to work.

        Source: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/deployment/update/waas-configure-wufb

        III. I locked the c:\Program Files\rempl folder permissions so System and TrustedInstaller can’t write to it. This prevents the installation of KB4023057. I did this because I am terrible at remembering to run wushowhide, which is a horrible tool by the way.

        IV. NEVER EVER EVER EVER […] CLICK “CHECK FOR UPDATES.” If you click “Check for Updates,” Microsoft does whatever it wants and ignores all the deferral settings, good practice, common decency, and the fact that “check for” does not mean “install whatever you want.” NEVER CLICK “CHECK FOR UPDATES.” EVER.

        V. There may have been more settings I changed. These are just the ones I documented. I hope they’re sufficient. I’m pretty sure I disabled a bunch of tasks in Task Scheduler. I can’t remember what they are though and can’t check because I have since reinstalled Windows 8.1. I can’t believe how much less aggravating 8.1 is after fighting 10 for so long. The only thing I miss from 10 is being able to mousewheel-scroll background windows. Turns out I used that all the time.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #239602 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Ever since the October update got pulled my system has stopped re-enabling Windows Update on me.  Now that it no longer prompts me to try and do an update daily, requiring me to crash wupdate again to keep a working computer, I haven’t bothered shutting it down.

        It’s like being in the eye of a storm.

      • #239613 Reply
        KP
        AskWoody Plus

        No joy for Windows 10 – 1709 Home. Last time it worked after doing a PC Reset. The September 9 posting worked well on Windows 10 – 1709 Pro if you Paused off before the first WUShowHide.

      • #239616 Reply
        RetiredGeek
        AskWoody MVP

        IMHO, Trust but Image! 😎

        May the Forces of good computing be with you!

        RG

        PowerShell & VBA Rule!
        Computer Specs

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #239620 Reply
        James Bond 007
        AskWoody Lounger

        Microsoft really makes it as difficult as possible to fight Windows Update on Windows 10, eh?

        Even if the updates work fine, that is not the point (and we all know how “good” the quality of recent Microsoft updates are, 1809 initial release comes to mind). The point is to be able to avoid updates when necessary, and Microsoft does everything in their power to prevent normal (Home) users from doing that in Windows 10.

        From my tests in virtual machines (using Pro / Pro Workstation / Enterprise / Education) and my only machine running Windows 10 LTSB (as a testing machine), what I will do if I ever run Windows 10 (LTSC for me) in the future, is to disable Windows Update using Group Policy and manually download and install any update I may want (using WuShowHide to check first), at a time I choose. Home is not a version I will ever touch.

        Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #239722 Reply
        mcbsys
        AskWoody Plus

        Keep in mind that if the update you hide is re-released, it will have a new update ID (though likely the same KB number) and will be re-queued unless you hide it again. I have in the past used a script to uninstall and hide certain updates every day. This dates back to when I was blocking the updates that nagged users to upgrade Windows 7 to 10:

        Uninstall and Hide Windows Updates

      • #239760 Reply
        wavy
        AskWoody Plus

        Howdy! For the last several months, I have been trying an alternative way of updating Windows 10 on my home computers. Here’s what I have been doing:

        1. I’m keeping Windows update completely shut down.
        2. I make a disc image.
        3. I run Belarc Advisor to show me missing updates.
        4. I double-check the advisability of installing them.
        5. I use Belarc’s provided links to download the stand-alone updates.
        6. I manually install the files.

        I like this because I have control of the update process. The down sides I have found so far are that:

        • It’s not a background process and it requires my attention.
        • an occasional install aborts because it isn’t applicable to my system.

        YMMV.

        Been doing this for a couple of years now.
        wushowhide has never worked for me. Likely disabled what lets it do its stuff.

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #239768 Reply
        davinci953
        AskWoody Plus

        This is the reason I avoid Windows 10 like the plague. Unfortunately, my work system is starting to get a bit long in the tooth, and I might have to bite the bullet soon. Something like pausing updates just shouldn’t be this hard.

      • #239905 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        @PKCano, Quick question. I was messing with my windows 10 update service and never noticed what the default startup should be. It’s set at automatic (trigger) now, but I’m reading online where the default should be manual. did I mess it up, and what should I have it set on. I am currently using WUB and when I use it to unblock the service, it sets it to automatic trigger. Should I enable the service with WUB and then set to manual before using WUB to disable it or is it okay the way it is?

        • #239907 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          I believe the default is Manual (Trigger Start), but I know nothing about what WUB does.

        • #239910 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          Thank you..Windows Update Blocker (WUB) disables the windows update service and then through the registry it assigns it a read only attribute so that windows cannot turn it back on.

      • #691798 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        I really hope people start pushing back on Microsoft, because they’re going way too far with this “shove it down their throats” mentality.

      • #1077611 Reply
        Latka
        AskWoody Plus

        If an unwanted update has already been downloaded, pending “update and restart,” here’s how to stop and delete it, courtesy PKCano.

        https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/windows-update-overriding-metered-connection/#post-399155

         

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