News, tips, advice, support for Windows, Office, PCs & more. Tech help. No bull. We're community supported by donations from our Plus Members, and proud of it
Home icon Home icon Home icon Email icon RSS icon
  • How to avoid installing the upgrade to Win10 version 2004

    Home Forums AskWoody blog How to avoid installing the upgrade to Win10 version 2004

    Tagged: 

    Viewing 20 reply threads
    • Author
      Posts
      • #2265517 Reply
        woody
        Da Boss

        It took Microsoft more than four years to give us the tools to fend off unwanted upgrades. But we have them now, and they’re working. Just curtail you
        [See the full post at: How to avoid installing the upgrade to Win10 version 2004]

        4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2265541 Reply
        John
        AskWoody Lounger

        I delay them for 90 days, then decide if more time is needed.

      • #2265551 Reply
        sheldon
        AskWoody Plus

        I will hide it via wushowhide and then set feature update to 365 days.  I have to do this every month when a new version a “2004” comes out.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2265549 Reply
        pedro
        AskWoody Lounger

        WSL2.

        I already installed, using Insiders and then selecting “Stop getting preview builds” to checked.

        So far so good!

        As a bonus, winget! Though I suppose it will disappear once 2004 gets onto the stable track.

      • #2265569 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        As a bonus, winget!

        Why use a copycat of Ninit which is much better ?

        • #2265572 Reply
          pedro
          AskWoody Lounger

          I thought ninite was for enterprise only. I am using Chocolatey with an eye on winget. Is ninite better than choco for single user usage?

        • #2265573 Reply
          Kirsty
          Da Boss

          Why use a copycat of Ninit which is much better ?

          Ninit is much better, or the copycat of it is?
          OR: Why use a copycat of Ninit? which (Ninit or its copycat) is much better?

          Sorry, it’s not clear what you are saying 🙂

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2265576 Reply
            Alex5723
            AskWoody Plus

            Ninit is much better

            Ninite support a much wider range of software.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2265594 Reply
              b
              AskWoody Plus

              Ninite can install 91 programs and Winget can install 331.

              2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2265601 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          Which is “better” is pretty subjective. I personally use and love Ninite, but there may be people who prefer Winget instead.

          IMO unless there’s a meaningful discussion about the pros and cons of both (i.e. a critical examination) I don’t think people should be trumpeting “X is better than Y!” without a detailed overview of both.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2265577 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I will hide it via wushowhide and then set feature update to 365 days.  I have to do this every month when a new version a “2004” comes out.

        Why use both wushowhide and feature deferral ? Isn’t one enough ?

        • #2265635 Reply
          EP
          AskWoody_MVP

          Win10 Pro users can use either wushowhide or feature deferral – not necessary to use both.
          Win10 Home edition users don’t have that luxury as they have to use only wushowhide

          2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2265692 Reply
          sheldon
          AskWoody Plus

          Using both gives me “extra protection” against Microsoft

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2265579 Reply
        bbearren
        AskWoody MVP

        For those of you chomping at the bit to install Win10 version 2004 (due out this week) — I have to ask. Why?

        Because I can, I can do so with impunity, and I follow my own advice rather than the advice of the experts.  I can peruse it for myself at my leisure.  Reviews are seldom of interest to me; some things are always left out.  I’m also particularly interested in how the update handles the carved-up B side of my dual boot.

        Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
        "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
        "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2265641 Reply
        pHROZEN gHOST
        AskWoody Lounger

        The question asked is …why?

        Simple, some people have to be first to experience every new toy on the market even if there is an “extra cost”.

        Byte me!

        • #2265673 Reply
          bbearren
          AskWoody MVP

          Simple, some people have to be first to experience every new toy on the market even if there is an “extra cost”.

          It’s just another Windows Update.  I block driver updates via Group Policy; other than that I have never paused, postponed nor blocked any update Windows has offered my machines.

          We all have our reasons for doing the things that we do.  My preference is to have timely and completely updated Windows installations, together with a complete library of drive images safely stored away.  In two decades+, I’ve had no issues.  And there is no “extra cost”.  If I should ever get a pooched machine, I can return it to its un-pooched state in six minutes.  It ain’t no big deal.

          Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
          "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
          "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

          • #2265964 Reply
            rontpxz81
            AskWoody Lounger

            I’ve had no update issues until Windows 10.

            And how do you return it to its un-pooched state in six minutes- never heard of restoring from a disc image that fast before

            • #2266142 Reply
              bbearren
              AskWoody MVP

              And how do you return it to its un-pooched state in six minutes- never heard of restoring from a disc image that fast before

              I use TeraByte Image for Windows, my OS partition is only 100GB.  I dual boot, and restarting to the B side takes ~50 seconds, opening Image for Windows and restoring my OS image takes under 5 minutes.  Fairly straight forward.

              I could also go to All settings > Update & Security > Recovery > Advanced startup and boot into TBWinRE (for me, it’s on a separate partition) and run Image for Windows > Restore from there.  For those who don’t dual boot, Image for Windows has a script (TBWinRE.cmd) as well as a tutorial that are installed along with Image for Windows.  It’s no more  difficult than opening an elevated Command Prompt, typing the name of the script, Enter, and follow a couple of prompts.

              All in all, not a big deal.  For me, getting un-pooched is pretty much six minutes either way.

              Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
              "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
              "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

              • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by bbearren.
      • #2265669 Reply
        KB6OJS
        AskWoody Plus

        If everyone were to follow that same line of thinking, there would be nobody participating in the Insider Preview, there would be no early-adopters, and we would all suffer from perpetually even-more-inferior updates — if there were any at all.

        I’m in the Slow Ring at present.  And when the final release comes around, I will make a complete image backup of my system before installing that version as I do with any update being installed.  Macrium Reflect Free is a great tool for this, which I highly recommend to everyone.  That, and an external hard drive that can handle at least four image backups, are what I consider essential tools.

        “Blessed are the pessimists, for they hath made backups.” 🙂

        //Steve//

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2265984 Reply
          woody
          Da Boss

          Not at all. I’m in various Insider rings. I know many people who run Insider builds. But those are people with dedicated hardware and a high tolerance for pain.

          There’s exactly zero reason for a “normal” Windows user to install Win10 2004 before we’ve had a chance to see and dissect the bugs – and either come up with workarounds, or wait for Microsoft to fix them.

          It’s been that way since the very first versions of Windows.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2266124 Reply
            bbearren
            AskWoody MVP

            There’s exactly zero reason for a “normal” Windows user to install Win10 2004 before we’ve had a chance to see and dissect the bugs – and either come up with workarounds, or wait for Microsoft to fix them.

            I must disagree.  Not everyone here at AskWoody fits such a category.  I am a two decades+ experienced “normal” Windows user (not an IT Pro; using Windows for my own purposes) who has zero reason to wait for anyone to tell me when it’s safe for me to install an update.  It only takes a recent drive image (my oldest is from 2:00AM Sunday) to eliminate any cause for concern in updating Windows.

            I’ll update as soon as the update is made available, and report any issues here.  If there are no issues, I’ll report that as well.

            Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
            "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
            "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

            • #2266164 Reply
              woody
              Da Boss

              I would have a very hard time categorizing you as “normal.”

              1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #2266240 Reply
                wavy
                AskWoody Plus

                ROTFL
                but we still like you bb

                🍻

                Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
                1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2266228 Reply
              Elly
              AskWoody MVP

              @bbearran- I consider you technically competent… a person who can recover from an update quickly and easily… not at all on the same level of the normal ‘non-techy’ user. Given your experience, you probably invest in hardware that has better specs than those that bought a laptop on sale, because that is the cheapest they’ve ever seen, and they can finally afford one. The last describes most of my friends and family. Their hardware has taken a beating by WU ever since W10 was first imposed on their systems. Initially they went back to Windows 7. Some have gone to Linux Mint. W10 has remained problematic.

              Personally, I just spent most of May struggling to get and maintain an internet connection. One thing worse than being non-techy, so that it is a real effort to understand and get my computer to function the way I need it to, is being stuck at home without being able to maintain an internet connection and research how to diagnose and fix the problem.

              My Windows 7 never threw problem after problem at me to have to troubleshoot.

              If we didn’t have the DEFCON system, and allow others (like you? but maybe not you, as you have better hardware?) our computers would be unusable for even longer periods of time… in fact, most of our computers would not be functioning at all. Now, all those non-techy parents that bought those cheap computers are trying to keep them alive so their kids can stay connected to school.

              I was almost happy, almost comfortable with my W10 desktop… ready to believe that Microsoft had most of the bugs out, and that it was safe to update without jumping through hoops… Could I have restored from back up? Yes… On Windows 7 that would have been sufficient… but I would still face Microsoft’s unfriendly updating, and need to know and fix whatever the problem is. I also hit the black desktop, but knew (prepared ahead of time) how to fix that. Had to reassure other family that hit it. Nothing like a black desktop and data that appears missing to inspire confidence in an OS! Again… Windows 7 was never so obnoxious, time-consuming, making me jump through obscure hoops, in order to maintain a functioning OS.

              Personally, I’m very grateful to Woody, and the people on this site, who take the time to figure out what the problems are, and guide us through the updating minefield.

              @bbearran, I’m grateful to you, for reporting your lack of problems, and how you back up and maintain your system. One of the best things about this site is the wide variety of experience, from pros to absolute beginners, and the clarity regarding what choices are actually available to us, and to allow individuals to make those decisions without derision or pressure.

              Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

              3 users thanked author for this post.
              • #2266394 Reply
                bbearren
                AskWoody MVP

                I don’t want to de-rail this thread, but I’d like to respond to @Elly.

                I have two DIY boxes.  My desktop, a mini-tower (the specs are in a link in my signature) and my NAS, a mid-tower.  Both have the same Motherboard/CPU combination, which is low to mid-level spec, and all parts were bought on sale, and with the exception of HDD’s/SSD’s, after they were out of production.  My laptop is a Dell Latitude E5420 from 2011, also bought on sale directly from Dell with mid-level specs.  I don’t have any high-end hardware at all.

                I’ve always stayed behind the curve on hardware, always buying out-of=production parts (except for PSU and UPS) and going for mid-level performance rankings.  The only item I ever bought that was not on sale or out=of-production was a Toshiba SSD from Office Depot for my laptop to replace a failing spinner, because I needed it for work the next day.  And yes, I simply restored a complete drive image after I installed the SSD to get right back to where I was before the spinner started failing.

                In my more than two decades of living in the Windows world, I’ve had a few hardware failures (which are always when, not if), including a handful of HDD failures, one of which was so deadly the PC would not even power on, much less post.  After I replaced that HDD, I restored a full drive image and was right back to where I had been before the failure.

                I am continually getting elbow deep into Windows innards, including the registry, and so I always have recent drive images to pull me back out of the ashes and restore my working system.  I look at Windows Update in exactly the same way, because that’s what Windows Update is doing, getting elbow deep into Windows innards including the registry, and I’m always prepared with a recent drive image to pull me back to a working system should the need arise.

                There are also some things that I don’t do.  I don’t use TSR helper apps to keep my software updated or my drivers updated.  The only programs I use are productivity programs, like Office, video editing software, audio editing software and the like, and a couple of power tools for my piddlin’.  I don’t use CCleaner or any other such apps.

                I make extensive use of Task Scheduler to perform all my routine maintenance using Windows own tools for the most part.  I use Image for Windows run through Task Scheduler to keep my drive images current.

                My systems are quite lean, as it were, and I have used various methods that I’ve developed over the years to keep Windows responsive, efficient and stable.  Windows 10 has proven to me to be the most stable, reliable and secure version yet.

                After a house fire in 2011 zorched my two PC’s, I ordered a very low-end Dell Inspiron D580 (discounted 20%) because I didn’t have time to build a new box.  At the same time, I ordered a 1TB HDD (on sale through Amazon).  I installed that HDD in the D580, restored my pre-fire drive images to it, and started dual booting OEM Windows 7 Home (that the Dell shipped with and which I stripped of all bloatware) and Retail Windows 7 Ultimate.  The only thing I lost was time.

                In my years I’ve learned three basic, powerful lessons in keeping Windows reliable, responsive and efficient.  Keep it lean, keep it fully updated, make frequent drive images.

                I contend that I don’t have problems with Windows Update because of the way I run Windows lean and fully updated.  My insurance policy is frequent drive imaging.  I’ve restored many a drive image because of my own tinkerin’, but not because of a failed Windows Update.

                Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
                "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
                "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

              • #2266414 Reply
                woody
                Da Boss

                At the risk of driving this thread further off-topic, let’s seal it off here.

      • #2265700 Reply
        Bundaburra
        AskWoody Plus

        It’s also important to know that an image restore will actually work, should you need to do so.  Needs to be tested occasionally.

        Windows 10 Pro 64 bit 2004

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2265851 Reply
        Carl D
        AskWoody Lounger

        I downloaded the latest evaluation version of 2004 the other day from UUP Dump and installed it on a spare solid state drive.

        Took about 10 minutes before I shut it down and reconnected 1909. Can’t really see any difference between 1909 and 2004 except a few changed icons on the Start Menu and a couple of extra “features” which I’m sure I would have been uninstalling very quickly.

        I didn’t have the PC connected to the Internet (as usual) during the install so I didn’t get to see what extra ‘bloatware’ came with 2004.

        Oh, and I remembered to turn off Fast Startup in the Power Settings of 2004 and rebooted before shutting it down and disconnecting and reconnecting my 1909 SSD otherwise Windows wants to run chkdsk on the 1909 drive. Been caught out with that one before, I have no idea why MS keep making Fast Startup the default on every Windows 10 install, it causes more problems than it “solves” in my opinion – especially on dual boot systems.

        Oh, and I use StopUpdates10 to block all Windows 10 updates until I’m ready to install them.

        Gigabyte GA-B250M-D3H Motherboard, Intel i5-7600 CPU, 32GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 2004 64bit.

      • #2265879 Reply
        Bundaburra
        AskWoody Plus

        If you have Pro, then there’s no need for external software to control updates.  Use the “Windows Update for Business” settings in Group Policy.

        Windows 10 Pro 64 bit 2004

      • #2265909 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        If you have Pro,

        If you have a Pro there is no need for Group Policy except for ‘Notify don’t download – 2′
        Pro deferrals are at Windows Update Advanced Options’ and Feature Update and Optional Updates won’t install until you click on ‘download and install’.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2265970 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Hi Woody, I’ve read your article on Computerworld. very helpful! You write:

        Step 4: If you’re on version 1903 or 1909, don’t click that link.

        If you’re running Windows 10 version 1903 or 1909, sooner or later you’ll see a Windows Update notice (Start > Settings > Update & Security) like the one in the screenshot below.

        The notice will appear in Windows 10 1903 and 1909 Home and Windows 10 1903 and 1909 Pro. (Yay!)

        If you want to avoid installing Windows 10 version 2004, don’t click the Download and install link. It’s that simple.”

        But what about the regular monthly quality updates, do they come with a download-and-install-button of their own? Or does postponing the 2004-update also menas postponing all regular KN-updates? meaning

      • #2266028 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        The unfortunate issue with Win 10’s handling of updates is that although technically proficient people who come to this site as a way of monitoring when updates should or shouldn’t be applied, and can easily postpone an update, regular users who see all this as “computer mumbo jumbo” may be taught how to postpone an update but would never know when to do so.

        With Win 7, you simply turned off Windows Updates and kept it that way until such time as updating was required.  With the Postpone method now in place, regular users keep asking me, “OK, I see how, but when am I supposed to do this?”  I explain the twice a year version updates and patch Tuesday.  When I suggest turning it off a few days before with at least a two week delay, they tell me I’m insane if I think they can remember to do this on any kind of a regular occurring basis.  And when I show them this website their eyes glaze over!

        So the pausing of updates may be a step in the right direction, but it is of dubious value to the great mainstream of Windows users.

        • #2266039 Reply
          geekdom
          AskWoody Plus

          Try WuMgr (Windows Update Manager) for controlling and viewing updates:

          https://github.com/DavidXanatos/wumgr

          G{ot backup} TestBeta
          offline▸ Win7Pro SP1 x64 Storage
          online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.900 x64 i5-9400 RAM8GB HDD Firefox79.0b7 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
        • #2266046 Reply
          woody
          Da Boss

          Man, I wish I knew how to keep them from having their eyes glaze over.

          MS-DEFCON is the key for “normal” Windows users.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2266051 Reply
            geekdom
            AskWoody Plus

            The problem is that the preventative rules are different for every Windows version and type: Windows 7, Windows 10 Pro, Windows 10 Home, Windows 8.1, Enterprise, Education. Eyes glaze over on the specifics, not the general.

            G{ot backup} TestBeta
            offline▸ Win7Pro SP1 x64 Storage
            online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.900 x64 i5-9400 RAM8GB HDD Firefox79.0b7 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
          • #2266061 Reply
            b
            AskWoody Plus

            The MS-DEFCON level also assumes that you’re using Firefox or Chrome, or any browser other than Internet Explorer or Edge.”

            Why not Edge?

      • #2266119 Reply
        b
        AskWoody Plus

        But Win10 version 2004 seems to be completely bereft of compelling new features.

        Not even “Optional Updates”?

        Optional Updates experience

        Windows 10 May 2020 Update introduces new “Optional updates” page that will allow you to select and choose non-critical Windows updates for your drivers or other parts of the system.

        The drivers can be manually installed or you can also skip the installation. The experience is much like things were with Windows 7, which also included optional updates in the Control Panel.

        Windows 10 May 2020 Update: Here’s a list of all new features

        • #2266389 Reply
          woody
          Da Boss

          If I used Windows to update my drivers, that might be worthwhile. But I don’t – and you know why! The drivers Microsoft offers are of dubious quality and vintage. That’s been consistently true for decades.

          As for updates to “other parts of the system”… I don’t know what those are, and I suspect we won’t find out for quite some time.

      • #2266121 Reply
        georgea
        AskWoody Lounger

        I’m on a domain-joined laptop with 1909.  While there are no advanced update options other than “select a pause date up to 35 days” [no feature deferral for up to a year] because of this, if I click on “check for updates”, I get updates.  This despite admin GP having “intranet update service for detecting updates” being set.  This is contrary to today’s Woody ComputerWorld article which says <<If your computer is connected to a network that has an update server (such as WSUS or SCCM), you don’t have any control over your version — the network admin gets to sweat this one out. >>

        Is this expected behavior for a PC with an update server – eg, clicking on check should NOT result in getting updates?

        • #2266335 Reply
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          Most likely your IT people have not removed that ability from machines (via group policy). An oversite methinks.

          cheers, Paul

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2266341 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        In our house, we had 2 days’ work sabotaged in the last week, by MS demanding to update Windows during business hours, when set to not interrupt etc etc. Even on a metered connection, yada yada yada (not to mention, it wasn’t good enough to do it properly the first time, and repeated the process when we thought it was “safe” for another few weeks).

        We’re hopping mad, being a self-employed contractor with so little work in the last 3mths, thanks to Europe shutting down for the duration.  There’s a prospect of work coming in, so our fingers are crossed we can keep the wolf from the door a little, if MS is just willing to oblige.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2266449 Reply
        EP
        AskWoody_MVP

        Born is recently reporting this about v2004:

        https://borncity.com/win/2020/05/27/windows-10-version-2004-will-be-released-on-may-27-2020/

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2266462 Reply
          woody
          Da Boss

          We shall see…..

          (Several German-language 2004 support pages are already up, but not populated.)

      • #2266480 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus
        • #2266487 Reply
          EP
          AskWoody_MVP

          the 2004 MCT is now working as of 10am pacific local time and can download the 2004 ISOs which are build 19041.264

          time for many of the win10 users to hold off installing 2004
          me, bbearren & a few others will go ahead & try out 2004 [don’t try to stop us, Alex5723 🙂 ]

          • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by EP.
          • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by EP.
          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2266521 Reply
        geekdom
        AskWoody Plus

        Windows 2004 is not yet available in the Windows Update queue.

        G{ot backup} TestBeta
        offline▸ Win7Pro SP1 x64 Storage
        online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.900 x64 i5-9400 RAM8GB HDD Firefox79.0b7 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
    Viewing 20 reply threads

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: How to avoid installing the upgrade to Win10 version 2004

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.