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  • How to block updates permanently

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 How to block updates permanently

    This topic contains 9 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  jabeattyauditor 1 day, 13 hours ago.

    • Author
      Posts
    • #1978135 Reply

      doriel
      AskWoody Lounger

      I think I found the way how to stop your PC from updating. I will test this on my machine, ill give it a go.

      https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/help/949977/relocation-of-the-users-directory-and-the-programdata-directory-to-a-d

      I m wondering if all updates are going to be blocked, or just major updates (1903, 1909, 2003,… )block-updates

      I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.
      --- Thomas A. Edison

      Attachments:
    • #1978138 Reply

      Kirsty
      Da Boss

      I believe there can be major downstream issues from moving the user & programdata directories, such as this, so it should only be done with caution, and probably not recommended for novices.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1978139 Reply

      doriel
      AskWoody Lounger

      Sorry, I see this is for Windows Vista only 🙁

      I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.
      --- Thomas A. Edison

    • #1978636 Reply

      WStrescott
      AskWoody Lounger

      This is the second time an update to Windows 10 has caused a crash, first Dell consierge, trying to fix a windows thing, crashed the computer and had to put a new board in. $300 spent, restoring files from backups. Secondly, the latest update to win10 deleted both Firefox and addins, and Thunderbird with all folders of saved emails (for reference) and email address books, and lists. Recovery from backups. Two weeks (continuing) and over $200 spent. Currently Thunderbird, with every click, comes up “not responding”. As an editor of two publications I can no longer spend this kind of time or money to fix and recovery from the s***load of problems Microsoft is giving us.

      I’m going to move to chromebook as soon as possible. I’m not a computer guru although I’ve been with computers since CP/M Os, MS/Dos on Sequa portables. As someone who was on the Insider Program, perhaps someone, (Woody?) would tell Microsoft, they are criminals when they delete purposefully other’s software. I will not tolerate that kind of activity.

      Paul

      • #1978641 Reply

        b
        AskWoody Plus

        If you had evidence it was done purposely by Microsoft, you could report it to the police for criminal prosecution and compensation.

        Knuckle dragger Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Crazy/Ignorant Toxic drinker Blockhead Unwashed mass Seeker/Sucker "Ancient/Obsolete" (Group ASAP) Win10 v.1909

      • #1978650 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        The behavior you describe is odd – and most likely there are multiple causes. The golden rule is to  uninstall the update, and see if things get better. (That, and make backups before you update!)

        As for Chromebooks… I love ’em. My next computer will be a Chromebook. Unless you have a very specific need to run a very specific Windows program — and you don’t mind Google’s snooping (which may rival Microsoft’s) — Chromebook is the way to go.

        I say that with a heavy heart. I’ve been writing about Windows since version 3.1. But for most folks the Chromebook is simply newer, better, less intrusive, more reliable.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1978642 Reply

      Susan Bradley
      AskWoody MVP

      Not installing updates is not the answer.  Getting better patches is.

      Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1978701 Reply

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      I ran Windows 7 similar to the configuration in the OP (I used my own methods) for years without issue.  Service Pack 1 installed without any hassle at all.  No security updates were blocked.  But it wouldn’t upgrade to Windows 8 – only a clean install would do.  I didn’t want a clean install, so I put my Windows 7 installation back together, and then upgraded to Windows 8.

      For Windows 10 I had to come at it a bit differently, but it still works.  The B side of my daily driver desktop dual-boot is setup this way.  It does not block security updates, Defender definition updates, or any other updates.  It does block upgrades, however.  The error message says that it is not a Microsoft-supported installation and not eligible for upgrade.

      It can still be upgraded by putting it all back together, and that is done by reversing the procedure.  However, the method is not for the faint of heart.  It is for experienced/advanced users only.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

    • #1984005 Reply

      dgreen
      AskWoody Lounger

      The behavior you describe is odd – and most likely there are multiple causes. The golden rule is to  uninstall the update, and see if things get better. (That, and make backups before you update!)

      As for Chromebooks… I love ’em. My next computer will be a Chromebook. Unless you have a very specific need to run a very specific Windows program — and you don’t mind Google’s snooping (which may rival Microsoft’s) — Chromebook is the way to go.

      I say that with a heavy heart. I’ve been writing about Windows since version 3.1. But for most folks the Chromebook is simply newer, better, less intrusive, more reliable.

      woody
      I am also going with a Chromebook next computer.
      In fact I will be attending a class at our senior center on “introduction to chromebooks”.
      I have always had Dell computers and they have been very good to me, so I’m leaning towards a Dell Chromebook, however
      I’m not sure exactly what feature to look for in a Chromebook, or maybe something other then Dell would be another option?
      Having said that….
      I was hoping that as Jan. 2020 is almost here,  maybe a chromebooks thread with all the ins and outs of running one would be started here for those who Windows 10 is not an option.
      I do not have WiFi but I did learn here a while ago that you can get an adapter the will hook a chromebook up to ethernet.  DSL via landline is what I have now.
      I use Chrome for a browser so I’m thinking the learning curve might not be so bad.
      I guess I just want to know as much as I can what a Chromebook can do now and maybe what the chances are what it will be able to do in the future.

      • #1984009 Reply

        jabeattyauditor
        AskWoody Lounger

        I do not have WiFi but I did learn here a while ago that you can get an adapter the will hook a chromebook up to ethernet.  DSL via landline is what I have now.

        A low-cost WiFi router could be connected to your DSL modem – no need for a Chromebook-specific adapter. You’d also have WiFi access for any other devices (cellphone?) that you might want to connect.

        1 user thanked author for this post.

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