• How to check what was happening overnight

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    #2419158

    After reading a recent AskWoody newsletter I downloaded the CoreTemp utility and installed it on my system (a six-core Dell XPS runnning Win 10 Pro). I could see that under load the CPU temps regularly hit 100 degrees C. I reset the high/low and left it running overnight, and discovered when I looked at it in the morning that the core temps had been hitting 100 degrees C during the night. (And no, unless I am very much mistaken, it wasn’t a Windows Update.) So tonight I am going to capture the log (I messed up and didn’t capture it last night) to try and see when the high cpu load is occuring. Is there a simple way of keeping tabs on what activities are running when, so that I can marry up the high cpu load with process activity when I look at the results tomorrow?

    cheers

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    • #2419160

      You can check the application log file with the event viewer.

      --Joe

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2419184

      Alternatively, If you are really lucky, you might find the entries in this log easier to process

      Applications and services logs-Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-Power/Thermal-Operational

      I checked mine and found nothing literally (21H2, but my machine is rather old..) but you never know until you look..

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2419209

      Alternatively, If you are really lucky, you might find the entries in this log easier to process Applications and services logs-Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-Power/Thermal-Operational

      Unfortunately this doesn’t show the processes most active during (or responsible for) a thermal event, only the Process IDs at the time (if you add the column). Here’s a screenshot of mine:

      thermal_events

      IMO it’s surprising that neither built-in tools (PerfMon?) or third-party offer commandline ‘capture to log’ of processes responsible for high CPU activity over a period of time… unless I’m missing something really obvious.

    • #2419220

      Might not help with troubleshooting overnight issues, but if you want real-time monitoring of CPU/GPU usage, who’s hogging the hard drive or causing bottlenecks, I use the system monitor from M0O Software.
      <p style=”text-align: center;”>Moo-Metering

      </p>

      "War is the remedy our enemies have chosen. And I say let us give them all they want" ----- William T. Sherman

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