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  • How to remove the built-in version of Flash in Win10 and 8.1

    Home Forums AskWoody blog How to remove the built-in version of Flash in Win10 and 8.1

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    This topic contains 26 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  jstech 2 months ago.

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    • #217572 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      An interesting contribution from @ch100: Warning!!! Only for advanced users and for those accepting a certain degree of risk if they don’t understand
      [See the full post at: How to remove the built-in version of Flash in Win10 and 8.1]

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #217590 Reply

      Microfix
      AskWoody MVP

      Note: I’d highly recommend that you make an image of your system first!

      Thanks ch100 nice work! A couple of things that concern me about this is:

      1. Why not just block flash from being used in both W8.1 and W10 and be done with it?

      2. When using SFC /scannow, won’t it flag up that the system file integrity is violated due to missing flash components and then to repair a system, won’t it just re-introduce the missing flash for W8.1 or W10?

      No doubt this will be yet another mundane task to repeat once a W10 ‘Feature Upgrade’ is installed.

      I’ve always had flash disabled and blocked from use on our W8.1 systems (I’ve never used Macromedia/ Adobe Flash since around 2004) which blocks fine, it may be redundant on our systems but I know the system integrity is good.

      | W8.1 Pro x64 | Linux x64 Hybrids | W7 Pro x64 O/L | XP Pro O/L
        No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #217664 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody MVP

        Thank you @microfix.
        For most users who don’t want to go the extra mile to completely remove Adobe Flash, but at the same time do not want to use it, disabling/blocking in IE and Edge should be enough. However, it is highly recommended to keep Adobe Flash patched every time when an update is released by Microsoft.
        Removing it completely has the additional benefit of not receiving the Adobe Flash patch at all on Windows 8.1/10 and the servers equivalent versions if it was installed on the servers by mistake or pure curiosity.
        A new Feature Upgrade will more than likely bring it back, although I know that there are plans at Microsoft to discontinue including Flash soon, in line with other major players in the industry.
        sfc /scannow would not bring it back, because this procedure is as clean as removing any other CBS piece, like for example those under Turn Windows features on or off.
        It is an alternative procedure for those who requested such a procedure and I posted it because there is a lot of disinformation on the internet in most cases by changing file permissions by taking ownership of specific files under C:\Windows\system32\Macromed and C:\Windows\SYSWOW64\Macromed and deleting them manually. Such procedure is definitely wrong and would likely bring those files back during a repair performed with sfc /scannow

        It should not be seen as a recommendation from Woody, but rather an alternative procedure for those who are interested to try it.
        I am not going to argue with Susan, because for most users, even most power users and experts, her recommendation stands true.

        I am sure that @abbodi86 would like it, although he does not have to read this post to perform it 🙂

        3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #217585 Reply

      anonymous

      Obviously this is much better than deleting Flash from Windows directory like I was planning to do sometime. 😉

      • #217666 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody MVP

        This was posted exactly for the type of users like you, although my preference would be to reply to a non-anonymous poster. 🙂 See my post in reply to @microfix for details.

        • #217685 Reply

          anonymous

          Yeah fortunately it was worth thinking before acting to not disintegrate it from Windows like that, so I’ll do your sound procedure. Thank you for researching the minutia of removal and documenting the process. The mind is boggled at how such a small portion of compiled software can have so many problems.

    • #217587 Reply

      anonymous

      Should have been done ages ago by MS. Instead of bundling the utter junk with the OS.

    • #217604 Reply

      abbodi86
      AskWoody MVP

      Thanks @ch100

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #217612 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Lounger

      How about removing it from Windows 7? How is that different from what it is in those later versions of Windows?

      I’d thought that uninstalling it from the Control Panel was enough.

      • #217616 Reply

        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        @oscarcp, this thread does not concern Windows 7 but, to answer your query:
        Windows 7 doesn’t have Adobe Flash embedded into the operating system, the end-user needs to install it via adobe website initially.
        To remove Adobe flash from Windows 7 is via ‘programs and features’ within the control panel and probably by the ‘Adobe flash uninstaller’ if unsuccessful by conventional system methods.
        [Back on topic please]

        | W8.1 Pro x64 | Linux x64 Hybrids | W7 Pro x64 O/L | XP Pro O/L
          No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
        3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #217613 Reply

      anonymous

      And repeat all 6 months the same procedure als last half year James – yess Miss Sophie, same procedure as every half year?

    • #217634 Reply

      Susan Bradley
      AskWoody MVP

      I would not be removing packages.  You can block the use of flash through much safer means.

      https://www.howtogeek.com/222275/how-to-uninstall-and-disable-flash-in-every-web-browser  You want to block in the browser.

      Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #217669 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody MVP

        Susan, this is safe if performed correctly, but require a bit of knowledge and understanding of the CBS helps in assessing the procedure.
        A potential downside is that bringing Flash back in IE or Edge, require reinstalling the OS in place.
        But this is not the case for example if the preferred browser is Firefox where Flash add-on is installed as a regular software.
        I believe Chrome has already discontinued the use of Adobe Flash and Microsoft will follow suit soon.
        The leader in this matter is obviously Apple.

        • #217683 Reply

          b
          AskWoody Lounger

          I believe Chrome has already discontinued the use of Adobe Flash and Microsoft will follow suit soon.
          The leader in this matter is obviously Apple.

          Flash won’t disappear from Chrome, Edge or IE until it dies completely at the end of 2020:

          Saying goodbye to Flash in Chrome

          The End of an Era – Next Steps for Adobe Flash [in Edge/IE]

          Flash & The Future of Interactive Content [EOL plan from Adobe]

          Cannon fodder Daft glutton Idiot Kick Me Sucker More intrepid

          • #217788 Reply

            anonymous

            Two different references, confused by a common name.

            ch100 spoke of Chrome (OS) in a comparison with Microsoft and Apple. He might have said Alphabet or Google as he did not say Windows and iOS.

            b then spoke of Chrome (browser) in a comparison with Edge and IE(11), without reference to Safari.

            Getting flash out of the operating system is a good thing. Even though browsers may still require it to handle requested content. When the content no longer requires flash and can be consumed with HTML5 or some other new standard, then we can finally be rid of flash.

      • #217814 Reply

        anonymous

        Why should we keep the packages, what perceived or actual harm would occur?

    • #217656 Reply

      GreatAndPowerfulTech
      AskWoody Lounger

      In the past six years, as a Microsoft Partner, I’ve grown to expect them to randomly undo user tweaks. My five year old Chromebook still works perfectly with none of the nonsense that Steve Sinofsky injected into Windows 8. It will be interesting to see if the next forced update to 1809 will undo the Flash changes made by users.

      GreatAndPowerfulTech

      • #217670 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody MVP

        It will be interesting to see if the next forced update to 1809 will undo the Flash changes made by users.

        It is likely that 1809 will undo this procedure, which is simple enough to be performed once every 6 months. 🙂 There is a good chance though that 1809 is the last Windows 10 OS update supporting Flash natively, unless Microsoft is under contract obligation with Adobe to support it a little bit longer.

        • #217679 Reply

          jstech
          AskWoody Lounger

          Let’s hope so. Flash needs to become extinct. Problem is those who are holding onto it and not upgrading their software to run with HTML5.

          Group A | Windows 7 Pro 64-bit | Windows 10 Pro 1803 64-bit
          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #217682 Reply

            ch100
            AskWoody MVP

            It was the same with Java RE. It is virtually dead today for use over the internet, although it has a place and purpose on internal business networks.

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #218324 Reply

              jstech
              AskWoody Lounger

              Java is a pain too! I have a few old versions for just in case I need to get into say a printer with a jetdirect card.

              Group A | Windows 7 Pro 64-bit | Windows 10 Pro 1803 64-bit
    • #217658 Reply

      anonymous

      I’ve taken 3 three actions to disable Flash in Windows 8.1/IE (no Edge):

      1) Renamed the Flash folder in C:\Windows\System32\Macromed\ (e.g., YYY_Flash)
      2) Renamed the Flash folder in C:\Windows\SysWOW64\Macromed\ (e.g., ZZZZ_Flash)
      3) From gpedit.msc (Group Policy Editor), changed the the Turn off Adobe Flash in Internet Explorer and prevent applications from using Internet Explorer to instantiate Flash objects setting from Not Configured to Enabled, per https://borncity.com/win/2018/02/02/how-to-disable-adobe-flash-player-in-windows-8-8-1-10/

      The first two actions are sufficient to cause a Windows Update error code 800F0922 attempting to install the usual Security Update for Adobe Flash Player for Windows 8.1 for x64-based Systems, so if you do rename folders, yet want to stay current, you have to remember to rename both folders back to “Flash”, apply the Windows update for Adobe, then rename back to whatever_Flash.

      See https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/8376-enable-disable-adobe-flash-player-microsoft-edge-windows-10-a.html for the equivalent Group Policy change for Edge – looks like the setting is named Allow Adobe Flash in Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Microsoft Edge.

      I am also a little hesitant to rip Flash out of the innards of Windows if I can truly and effectively disable it.

    • #217780 Reply

      Jan K.
      AskWoody Lounger

      Step 6. You’re done. No more Adobe Flash in registry and…

      Wow! Really?

      I cleaned my machine for everything Adobe years ago and remember it was like removing root kits… tons and tons of registry entries.

      Nice guide!

      • #217826 Reply

        anonymous

        Looking at the amount of COM class identification serials for .NET and other software looks the same way.

    • #218012 Reply

      anonymous

      This procedure is of interest to those who don’t want to waste time with Adobe Flash security updating — there seems to be Flash package every month for this — when Flash isn’t being used any longer (IE uninstalled, Edge unused).  The procedure is clear, and worked without error.  An SFC /SCANNOW check afterwards did not show any integrity problems, so perhaps this Flash removal is permanent through monthly Win updates and Win 10 version upgrades.  Thanks for the post.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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