• How to transfer my current files into a new SSD

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    #2455059

    I have read the latest AskWoody Plus Newsletter, and I am interested in how to transfer my files into a new larger size SSD. I’ve never done this task before and am curious. There may be a topic on this, but I haven’t found it. I first need to purchase a new SSD to install before I take on the task of transferring everything over. Is there a reliable SSD that I should look for? Preferably a 2TB SSD. Any tips and advice will be greatly appreciated.

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    • #2455074

      Any SSD that fits your machine, has a warranty and fits your price bracket is the one to buy.

      What is the model of your PC and disk drive?

      Before you do anything you need a full backup. If you don’t have one you will need additional hardware to move the data.
      What backup program do you use?

      Are you sure you need a 2TB SSD. If you have room in the PC you can fit a smaller SSD as well as the original and install Windows on the SSD, then leave your big files on the original disk.

      cheers, Paul

    • #2455075

      Personally, I always buy Samsung SSDs, which isn’t to say other makes aren’t just as good.

      As for transferring all the files over from your old drive, there are a lot of very good programs out there that can easily accomplish this for you.

      I’ve been using Paragon for many years (currently using their free for non-commercial purposes Backup & Recovery Community Edition) and never had any issues with using it, including transferring my existing files over to new drives when needed.

      I’m sure others will chime in with their “just as good preferences” shortly.

    • #2455174

      We use Western Digital Black drives.

      If you are new to the installation of drives think about having a tech do the work for you. If you are in the states, we have found the people at Best Buy and Micro Center do good work.

      Make a note of the each drive’s information on a piece of paper.

      If you are doing the work yourself and you are upgrading a desktop turn off the power, open the box, insert the new drive in an empty bay, and connect the wires.

      Reboot the computer.

      If the new drive is a Western Digital drive, download and install on your existing drive the free Acronis app from the Western Digital support site.

      Open Acronis, go to tools, then clone.

      Being careful to know what is your existing drive and the new drive clone the contents of your old drive onto the new drive.

      Then take out the old drive and replace it with the new drive.

      If all goes well you should be good to go.

      BUT FIRST, BEFORE DOING ANY WORK ON YOUR COMPUTER BE SURE TO BACKUP YOUR DRIVE INCLUDING THE OPERATING SYSTEM AND DATA FILES!

      ALSO, IF THIS IS NEW TO YOU HAVE SOMEONE ELSE DO THE WORK FOR YOU – BETTER SAFE THAN SORRY.

       

    • #2455202

      Rush.

      Two modifications to Kathy’s sage advice:

      “If you are doing the work yourself and you are upgrading a desktop turn off the power, unplug the power cord, open the box, insert the new drive in an empty bay, and connect the wires.”

      “Being careful to know what is your existing drive and the new drive clone the contents of your old drive onto the new drive. This is done by Naming each drive (in its Properties), e.g., Old System, New System, Data, etc.

      Zig

    • #2455207

      I thank you all for your advice. After reading Kathy’s advice. I don’t feel confident enough to do it myself. I already have a C and D drive and I do not know if I have room for a third slot open or not without opening it up. Therefore I will leave all the details to the professionals. Yes I could do it myself, but I feel that there is too much I could screw up. It seemed easy at first to ask for assistance on how to do so. But doing the work is out of my league.

    • #2455221

      There are many options out there, just watch out for bundled crapware. I use the ancient but still extremely reliable Roadkil’s Unstoppable Copier. I’ve also used FastCopy and Tera Copy.

    • #2455246

      I don’t feel confident enough to do it myself

      Kathy makes it sound more difficult than it is. You should have a go yourself – after confirming the steps here. We will make sure you are safe and have an easy recovery path.

      cheers, Paul

      • #2455401

        Agree with Paul T – it’s not that hard. If you don’t have available drive connections (unlikely), you could just temporarily disconnect the D drive, then reconnect after the transfer is done and the new C drive is running. At least open up the case (after removing the power plug) and look around. You can post a pic here if you’re unsure what you’re looking at/for. We’ve all started from this position at one time.

        Zig

    • #2455407

      If you want to do the job yourself, start with downloading and reading the manuals for the computer.

      How to open the case, how gain access to the drives, etc.

    • #2455485

      You didn’t mention whether you wanted to transfer files from your “C:” or “D:” drives to a new larger SSD, or if both partitions are on the same, or separate physical drives. If the “D:” drive partition is on a separate physical drive, then it’s less likely to be an issue of causing Windows problems if that’s the one you wish to “copy”. I’m also assuming that you are using internal SATA drives.

      If both partitions are on the same physical drive, then things get a bit more involved. I will skip that part for now.

      But if they are on separate physical drives, and you just want to clone “D:”, I would attach the new SSD drive to an external USB/SATA adapter cable. Then run some free cloning software, either the bundled software that sometimes comes with a new SSD drive, or the free Macrium Reflect.

      The USB adapter cable will provide temporary power and data connections to the new SSD drive. As far as expanding the cloned partition to the full size of the new drive, I know that Macrium offers that ability, and probably others as well.

      Then just pop open the PC case, and swap the new “D:” drive for the old. Make sure that you can identify which old drive is which.

    • #2455521

      Just my 2 cents worth, the Crucial MX500 SATA SSD is a great drive in capacities up to 4TB, assuming you’re replacing the original drive in a laptop?

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