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  • How to xfr software+data frm W7 LT to Win10 LT

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Questions: Win10 How to xfr software+data frm W7 LT to Win10 LT

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      • #2039866 Reply
        CorKam
        AskWoody Plus

        Is there any basic procedure/recipe for moving Win 7 software and data from this old laptop to a newer Win 10 (1909) laptop? I have a Cat5 crossover cable–is PC Mover the best way?

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2039932 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        For moving from Windows 7 to another Windows 7, there was a great tool from Microsoft called Easy Transfer.  This does not work with or to Windows 10, but the software from various backup companies that is meant to replace it will often mention easy transfer in their descriptions to get search results to direct to them.  Most backup software companies have a program like Pcmover, but Pcmover is the one recommended by Microsoft when they discontinued Easy Transfer, and it is one of the most expensive (Pcmover price is per one use of the program).

        Without Pcmover, data can be copied fairly easily using an external drive or possibly your crossover cable if you can get a shared folder to work, the hardest part of copying data is remembering everything that may be useful, such as bookmarks and profiles from web browsers, and doing enough searches to find everything even if it is put in an unusual place.  Don’t destroy the original drive/computer until much later, in case some data was overlooked.

        For software, if you have your licenses in order and media or installers for everything, you can often reinstall all your software on the new computer.  If there are programs that you don’t have this for, or ones that install on Windows 7 but seem not to on 10, then a solution more like Pcmover becomes more favored.  I say this because some software runs fine on Win 10 that had been upgraded from Win 7, but is hard to install on Win 10.  Some (getting rarer) copy protection will require that you use a program on only one computer, or require you to get proof of removal before reinstalling.  One program that many people have is Office – any of the newer versions of Office will have your bought key saved in your Microsoft Account.

        There is also a free Microsoft program called USMT (user state migration tool) that is quite complex to use and meant to copy some data and settings  – not software.

        If you are familiar with backup software, Windows 10 can sometimes boot on non-original hardware – not the computer it started with.  Some backup software, often the paid version, has features to make it more likely to get a bootable restore to non-original hardware.  In theory, you could upgrade Win 7 to 10 on the old computer (often still for free), and then backup and restore to the new computer.  This is definitely not guaranteed to work, and may violate licenses, especially if you were to keep using the old computer.  You may need to go to device manager and remove some devices to let them reinstall drivers, and may need to seek out drivers for some other devices.

        If you are not a computer expert, migrating from one computer to another is one of the main jobs that computer techs do for customers.  It will cost more than PCmover.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2039947 Reply
        PKCano
        Da Boss

        Several years ago, I saw a User use EaseUS Todo PC Transfer (paid version), or one of their products,  move programs from Win7 to Win10.
        I have not used the program myself, and do not know if the process is still available from their software.  But it is worth looking on the website.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2040051 Reply
        Kirsty
        Da Boss

        Bearing in mind some software requires different versions for smooth installation in Windows 10, especially MFC printer software, I would suggest you consider installing software directly, after checking which is or isn’t compatible (from manufacturer websites), rather than just direct transferring. It might save some problems 🙂

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2087572 Reply
        aaron451
        AskWoody Plus

        Your fallback option is to create a virtual copy of your windows 7 machine and run the software via Virtualbox. I’ve used this method for years – still have functioning WinXP, Win98 machines.

      • #2110141 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        I’m putting up the white flag and having my techie move me to Win 10.

        I’ve never changed Windows versions before without getting a new computer. Will my current programs still work?

        What about my data? I’m going to run a backup with EaseUS. But I’m wondering whether I should also run a simple copy of my data files too, just in case I can’t get EaseUS to get my stuff back. (Xcopy? Robocopy?)

        Thanks.

      • #2110145 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Morty,

        Make an EaseUS image, then mount the image and attempt to recover a single file. Should be easy.

        I’ve not had any problems running programs on W7 and 10, but I don’t have any unusual ones, do you?

        Why can’t you upgrade / migrate? Much better to learn than to pay someone – assuming it’s not a business system.

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2110152 Reply
          Morty
          AskWoody Plus

          Why can’t you upgrade / migrate? Much better to learn than to pay someone – assuming it’s not a business system.

          Short answer: I’m a coward.

          Long answer, I like to leave expertise to the experts. I know enough just to get into trouble. I look at this as surgery, not first-aid.

          In a way, it is a business system. I do editing and writing from home. And I can’t afford the down time. I’m having the guy who sold me my machines do it. He gave me a good price then. And I like working with him.

          Thanks for the EaseUS tip. (Should I admit I’ve never tried restoring files?)

          • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by Morty.
          2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2110290 Reply
        mledman
        AskWoody Plus

        What about my data? I’m going to run a backup with EaseUS. But I’m wondering whether I should also run a simple copy of my data files too, just in case I can’t get EaseUS to get my stuff back. (Xcopy? Robocopy?)

        Computers, hard drives and operating systems can all be replaced – your data can not.  Yes, copy your data to other storage.  Xcopy, Robocopy, drag and drop – use whatever you’re comfortable with.

        Win 10 home - 1909
        Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2110296 Reply
          Morty
          AskWoody Plus

          Yup. Even paranoids have enemies.

          Thank you.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2110333 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        If your technician does the upgrade as an upgrade, not a clean install (this will mean needing at least 10GB free space), your data will remain in place and most programs will remain installed, and most programs should still work.  A few programs like antivirus software Windows will suggest to remove before doing the upgrade, and a few programs may not work.

        Making backups and copying files before handing it over is very very recommended.  Most computer technicians will as part of their standard form that you sign say that they are not responsible if they lose all your data.

        In addition to a fee for work done, some technicians will charge you the full retail price for Windows 10.  If you did it yourself, or had a more generous technician, there would be no cost for that part (the Windows 10 part).  A low-end computer can cost $300, and a good one can be purchased for $700, less if used.  Spending a lot on tech support may get your old software working (hopefully), but can become expensive compared to even buying a new computer, if you are able to reinstall your software on it.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2110501 Reply
          Morty
          AskWoody Plus

          Thanks for the detailed heads-up. Will check on the cost ratio of new hardware vs. upgrade before taking the plunge. Much appreciated.

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