• I have an SSD in my computer. Can cleaning stored garbage often damage it?

    Home » Forums » AskWoody support » PC hardware » PC hardware-General Questions » I have an SSD in my computer. Can cleaning stored garbage often damage it?

    Author
    Topic
    #2420652

    Can cleaning the SSD (removing useless files that stick around uninvited or are no longer necessary) shorten its useful life?

    (Yes, it depends on how big is the SSD, how one uses the computer … I know, I know.)

    Mine is a 1 TB SSD.

    I use a program that does the cleaning and is part of the malware protection software, in my case “Intego”, called “Washing Machine.”

    I clean with it every two weeks or so. Since I installed Intego in my Mac last August, it has cleaned some 4 GB worth of garbage files. Which I find pretty astonishing.

    What is probably the shortest safe frequency of successive removals (“cleanings”) of useless stuff, such as that in caches, etc. if one has an SSD in one’s computer? Daily? Weekly? Monthly? Quarterly? Annually?

    Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

    MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
    Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
    macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

    Viewing 7 reply threads
    Author
    Replies
    • #2420701

      One of the lowest promised lifespan SSDs is rated to allow 185TBW during the expected life.  TBW means terabytes (1TB) written.  If 500gb is written per week, it would last 7 years, longer than most computers are used.  Even users with the settings that waste the most drive writes – enabled page file, use of hibernation, and internet cache stored on the SSD, should not see 50gb written per day and should be fine.  It is servers and computers doing some types of crypto mining or heavy data processing that can wear out drives.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2420784

      Can cleaning the SSD (removing useless files that stick around uninvited or are no longer necessary) shorten its useful life?

      Not that you will notice.

      You can run a S.M.A.R.T utility that displays health/Life span and check before/after cleaning.

      https://www.macworld.com/article/334283/how-to-m1-intel-mac-ssd-health-terminal-smartmontools.html

      https://www.macgasm.net/news/check-m1-macs-ssd-health/ (look at Disk Drill)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2420910

      Alex, Thanks. That is good information. I have already brew, etc. installed, so installing this one could be quick.

      My current concern is with the question whether cleaning the SSD often will damage it, not with finding out how damaged it already is, although it is always good to know the latter.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

    • #2420918

      This Tech Report article from 2015 may be of interest regarding SSD life expectancy.

      Win 10 home - 21H2
      Attitude is a choice...Choose wisely

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2420936

      mledman: More than 1 petabyte (PB, that is a 1 followed by 15 zeroes of byes) of stuff read/written before failing is pretty staggering. And that was back in 2015, so maybe the following six years have brought that fatal limit somewhat higher?

      As to how to check the status of an SSD in a Mac:

      https://osxdaily.com/2018/05/31/how-check-smart-status-mac-hard-disk/

      Doing that in my Mac, it tells me that the S.M.A.R.T. status is “verified”, meaning the HDD or SSD is OK. For now. Question is: for hw much longer if I keep using the machine as I have been doing until now? Answer: probably several more years, but keep checking that S.M.A.R.T. status now and then.

      The current SSD status, etc. displayed in my Mac:

      Screen-Shot-2022-01-25-at-12.22.07-AM

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

    • #2420967

      Real SMART reporting (instead of Verified/Failing) can be done with these utilities.

      SMART Utility: $25
      DriveDx: $25
      HomeBrew with smartmontools: free
      SmartReporter: free

      cheers, Paul

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2420994

        Do you have a recommendation for a Smart utility for Windows 10 SSD and SATA drives?

        As far as reliability of the SSDs and my own experience.  The first SSDs I bought many years ago only lasted about 6 months to a year.  Technology advanced.  I have two SSDs running old Windows 7 setups that are at least 10 years old.  I believe my SSDs will out last my disc HDDs.

        Dana:))

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2421107

      As far as reliability of the SSDs and my own experience.  The first SSDs I bought many years ago only lasted about 6 months to a year.

      I have a old 10 years Windows 7 laptop with Crucial SSD that still runs well.

      Do you have a recommendation for a Smart utility for Windows 10 SSD and SATA drives?

      Portable CrystalDiskInfo

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2421260

      Smart utility for Windows 10 SSD and SATA drives?

      I have CrystalDiskInfo installed to monitor my disks. It pops up a warning and sends me an email if anything is amiss. Free and good, what more can you ask?

      cheers, Paul

    Viewing 7 reply threads
    Reply To: I have an SSD in my computer. Can cleaning stored garbage often damage it?

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use all available BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.