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  • IE Install new versions automatically

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows IE Install new versions automatically

    Topic Resolution: Resolved

    This topic contains 89 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  owdrtn 1 month, 2 weeks ago.

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    • #101508 Reply

      ch100
      AskWoody MVP

      In Internet Explorer, under About Internet Explorer, there is a check box with the description “Install new versions automatically”.
      Does anybody know exactly what that check box does?
      There are few results when searching on the internet, but none seems to have a definitive answer.

      IEInstallNewVersionsAutomaticaly

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      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #101520 Reply

      BrianL
      AskWoody Lounger

      I had IE 10 and I checked the box and when IE 11 came along it was installed automatically. That is my take.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #101523 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody MVP

        Which means that now after IE11, it should not matter one way or the other, since IE11 is declared to be the last version ever of IE11. But the check box is still there.
        There was something similar in IE6 under the Advanced Options, discontinued in IE7 and I believe that in IE8 and IE9 as well, but brought back in IE10, similar with IE11.
        Does this mean that someone still on IE10 and the check box unticked (disabled) would not see IE11 when checking for Windows Updates?

    • #101524 Reply

      anonymous

      I had wondered about this for awhile also, so I researched it now.

      From https://privacy.microsoft.com/en-us/ie11-win8-privacy-statement:

      “If you receive updates automatically through Windows Update, you’ll receive updates to Internet Explorer, including upgrades to new versions. These updates are installed without interrupting you. If you would prefer to choose whether and when you receive an upgrade to a new version of Internet Explorer via Windows Update, you may do so.

      If you turn off automatic version upgrades, you’ll still be offered a new version of Internet Explorer if you have Windows Update turned on, but it won’t be installed automatically.”

      7 users thanked author for this post.
      • #101529 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody MVP

        So IE11 would come as unticked and maybe Optional in WU if that check box is unticked and IE10 is installed?
        Or assuming IE12 after IE11?

        • #101533 Reply

          anonymous

          Here’s the way I interpret it (I didn’t test though):

          1. This checkbox affects only those who receive updates automatically through Windows Update.

          2. For those who receive updates automatically through Windows Update, if the checkbox is checked, then a major Internet Explorer version update is installed automatically with no user input.

          3. For those who receive updates automatically through Windows Update, if the checkbox is unchecked, then a major Internet Explorer version available update triggers a prompt which allows the user to choose whether to install it or not.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #101539 Reply

            anonymous

            More evidence: This checkbox probably is the implementation of the [then] future automatic upgrade option mentioned at https://blogs.windows.com/ie/2011/12/15/ie-to-start-automatic-upgrades-across-windows-xp-windows-vista-and-windows-7/:

            “Finally, future versions of IE will provide an option in the product for consumers to opt out of automatic upgrading. “

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #101543 Reply

              ch100
              AskWoody MVP

              The automatic update blocker from the URL which you posted was a temporary fix and was released at the time of release of IE9, IE10 and IE11 (in Windows 7) and I think IE7 and IE8 (XP & Vista).
              The implementation of that blocker is via a different registry key than the one which implements the original question in this thread.

            • #102675 Reply

              b
              AskWoody Lounger

              The link wasn’t just about the blocker.

          • #101644 Reply

            anonymous

            Two tests of IE 10 on Windows 7, with Windows automatic updates turned off.

            Test 1: “Install new versions automatically” checked.

            Test 2: “Install new versions automatically” unchecked.

            Same results in both cases when running Windows Update: Cumulative Security Update for IE 10 is of status Important, and checked. IE 11 is of status Optional and unchecked.

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #101768 Reply

              ch100
              AskWoody MVP

              I am getting the same result.
              The only difference compared to your post is in the behaviour of IE11 update which in certain conditions which I don’t understand, comes as Important (Critical Update, not Recommended) and checked while in other conditions comes as Optional (true Optional, not Recommended) and unchecked on Windows Update. One of the differences in behaviour is when IE11 was previously installed and later uninstalled, in which case IE11 update seems to always come as Optional.
              That check box from the original post is not relevant in both instances and while it may have served a purpose in the past, it seems to do nothing today, except for possible communication to Microsoft.
              One thing to note is that it sets a registry key per machine and is not available to non-administrator users.
              The equivalent setting is also implemented in a Group Policy per Computer, but again it does not seem to do anything.

            • #101820 Reply

              anonymous

              Very interesting. In both of my previous tests, prior to running those tests, I uninstalled IE 11, then installed IE 10.

              Tests involving automatic Windows updates are in progress….

      • #102148 Reply

        Bill C.
        AskWoody Lounger

        This has been my experience. I never checked the box, and I have never been upgraded unless I did it. When I was IE9, I got a few notices, but I had to go to the Microsoft website to move from IE9-10 and EI10-11. Updates were determined by Windows Update settings, not the check box.

        For a while I do remember a lot of nags about the new secure IE with Bing, but I never upgraded. Instad I went to MS and downloaded IE11 sans Bing.

        • #102153 Reply

          ch100
          AskWoody MVP

          I cannot reproduce it.
          I am wondering if there was a specific web site communicating with IE which has been discontinued or simply got broken and nobody maintains it.

        • #102300 Reply

          ch100
          AskWoody MVP

          @Bill C.
          The IE check box seems to affect only the status of the next IE version update offer as either Optional or Important. This is the meaning of “Install new versions automatically”, which is based on the assumption that Windows Update is configured to install Automatically either only Important or Important and Recommended updates.
          Regardless of the category, the next IE version can be installed using the normal WU behaviour.

          It has to be noted that this check box has only historical relevance, being relevant only on IE10 when being offered the upgrade to IE11.
          There is no need today to install IE10 before IE11 and the older versions of IE before IE10 do not have that configuration.
          Microsoft does not intend to release a newer version of IE which would be named IE12 and as such, the check box in IE11 does not serve any purpose, unless there will be a newer release sometime in the future.

          4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #102615 Reply

        anonymous

        What possible interpretations are there for this Microsoft sentence: “If you turn off automatic version upgrades, you’ll still be offered a new version of Internet Explorer if you have Windows Update turned on, but it won’t be installed automatically”? Here is one possible interpretation:

        1. When Windows updates are installed automatically, and IE 10 is installed, and IE 11 was never previously installed, the user is prompted whether to upgrade to IE 11. (This scenario hasn’t been tested thus far.)

        Any other interpretations?

        • #102621 Reply

          ch100
          AskWoody MVP

          It has been already answered.
          In your scenario, IE11 is offered as Optional unchecked and if updates are automatic, IE11 is not installed.

          • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  ch100.
    • #101577 Reply

      Noel Carboni
      AskWoody MVP

      I never knew the answer to that either. In my case as a rule I leave NOTHING on “automatic”, so unchecking it means the question should be moot, and that there is a greater chance that I will have to be involved before anything’s changed.

      A corollary observation is that after every IE update they pop up a dialog that asks you to choose between “Use recommended settings” vs. “Don’t use recommended settings”… What’s funny is that if you – as I have done – reconfigure IE to be MORE restrictive (and thus have a higher security level) than Microsoft, then after an update you choose “Use recommended settings”, they will actually lower your security level. It’s just another example of Microsoft most certainly doesn’t know what’s best.

      Anyway, I only point that out to show that anything Microsoft checks by default should seriously be considered for unchecking. 🙂

      -Noel

      8 users thanked author for this post.
      • #101581 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody MVP

        I wouldn’t say that Use Recommended Settings does any harm if it does any at all.
        The only things configured are to use SmartScreen Filter, which I don’t use but everyone has the right to think differently about it and configure Send Do Not Track requests which again I don’t configure but some people think differently.
        I previous versions of IE, the initial configuration was a lot more intrusive, but now it is pretty lean.
        And there is always the Group Policy “Prevent running First Run wizard” which can bypass the annoying first run and configure the settings in the most common good way.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #101649 Reply

          Noel Carboni
          AskWoody MVP

          Thank you. You’ve taught me something. I didn’t know about the “Prevent running First Run wizard” setting. Exactly what I want.

          It’s been a while since I inadvertently chose “Use recommended settings”, but as I recall I saw it make it possible for sites in the Internet zone to do much more than I ever allow normally – e.g. run ActiveX. Drive by malware infections, anyone?

          -Noel

          3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #101769 Reply

            ch100
            AskWoody MVP

            The First run wizard would also allow ActiveX controls to run, which I normally do not restrict further than the default behaviour.
            This further hardening needs to be done after the initial configuration, run via the wizard or avoided by setting the policy, which I normally do per-user, but it can be done per-computer.
            I also prefer to reset the Security Zones as default for “normal” functionality.
            I think that the ActiveX filtering setting in the menu list can block all ActiveX controls in one place and may be the configuration which you need.
            What is IE without ActiveX though? 🙂

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #101976 Reply

              Noel Carboni
              AskWoody MVP

              What is IE without ActiveX though?

              For me it’s turned into a quite secure browser that brings me the content I seek without the fluff, without the ads, and without the malware. It fits very well into my larger overall strategy of using a managed blacklist to avoid ad/bad sites.

              I keep ActiveX and other potentially insecure features enabled only in my Trusted Sites zone, but the list of those sites is vanishingly small and it’s been a long while since I needed to add any site there to get it to work. Originally I put e.g., my bank in there, but the rise of the other non-ActiveX browsers has pretty much made ActiveX obsolete. Same kind of thing as with Flash.

              My Internet zone allows almost nothing beyond basic scripting, and even that’s limited. Honestly it feels like I’ve created a little niche in which I enjoy a better, more secure browsing experience than everyone else. I abandoned listening to Microsoft’s advice on what to use for “recommended settings” long ago, and not just for Internet Explorer.

              -Noel

              5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #101967 Reply

      anonymous

      This option was introduced in IE 10; source: http://www.anandtech.com/show/5630/indepth-with-the-windows-8-consumer-preview/9.

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #102139 Reply

      anonymous

      There is a related Group Policy named “Install new versions of Internet Explorer automatically,” documented at https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj891001.aspx. This Group Policy setting is stored in a different registry location (HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Main!EnableAutoUpgrade) than Internet Explorer’s setting (HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Main!EnableAutoUpgrade).

      • #102146 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody MVP

        I think I mentioned that option already.
        But it does not make any difference if the configuration is done via GUI or Group Policy.
        The results are still the same.
        We still don’t know if that setting is currently in use, or even if it did anything in the past. I could not reproduce what few other posters claimed about the functionality of that setting.
        I am tempted to follow the same configuration which Noel proposed, to disable the check box on principle not to allow automatic updates, but if we don’t understand the effect, we may obtain quite a different behaviour.
        It is well known that in some editions of Windows Server one DNS setting configured to check the DNS root servers for name resolution is doing quite the opposite when selected or not.

    • #102159 Reply

      anonymous

      Here are two tests that I would appreciate if somebody else would do:

      As a baseline, use a Windows 7 computer that has IE 10 non-final version installed. Here is an IE 10 installer: http://filehippo.com/download_internet_explorer_windows_7_64/tech/14435/. Importantly, make sure that IE 11 has never been installed or uninstalled on this computer, because as ch100 has noted this is a variable that can change behavior.

      First test: Revert to baseline. Set IE 10’s setting “Install new versions automatically” to checked. Record initial version of IE. Set Windows updates to be automatically installed. Let all Windows updates that install automatically install. Record final version of IE.

      Second test: Revert to baseline. Set IE 10’s setting “Install new versions automatically” to unchecked. Record initial version of IE. Set Windows updates to be automatically installed. Let all Windows updates that install automatically install. Record final version of IE.

      I am doing the above tests, except that I am using a computer that already had IE 11 installed, so I uninstalled IE 11, and then installed IE 10.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #102195 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody MVP

        Here are the results:

        Windows 7 64-bit Ultimate with SP1 ISO, clean install in VMWare VM.

        First scan immediately after the installation, with no other patches except for what comes with the ISO and the updated agent which is mandatory, unless using third party tools for updating, offers IE11 as Important Update.
        IE10 is not offered at all.
        It would likely be offered if I hide IE11, but this is not subject of this test and we don’t want to mess the results by playing with Windows Update.

        Set Check for updates to Never.

        Install pre-requisites for IE10 according to:
        https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/2818833/prerequisites-for-installing-internet-explorer-10-in-windows-7-sp1

        The article is missing KB2639308 which is required as seen in the C:WindowsIE10_main.log
        Without this update, the installer require internet access even if it was configured for update-no.
        This is normal.
        I install the pre-requisites using a combination of Windows Update and manual where the pre-requisites do not come in the WU list as they are superseded. Installing their higher level replacements would work for a normal installation, but we need clean results here.

        Install IE10 with the switch update-no
        IE10-Windows6.1-x64-en-us.exe /update-no

        What happens from here:

        – With the default settings, upgrade IE automatically, when scanning for updates, IE11 is offered as Important

        ie10rtm

        ie11-important

        – With IE auto upgrade disabled, IE11 is offered as Optional.

        ie10rtm-donotupgrade

        ie11-optional

        I can consistently reproduce this behaviour.

        This means that systems managed via WSUS or SCCM are not affected, because they get administrator approved updates and once approved, they are all seen as Important.
        The difference between various update types in WSUS is made at the server level, while the client agent does not care.
        Also it appears that a certain later update for IE or possible for the Windows Update Agent has modified this intended behaviour which now is inconsistent with the settings, for systems fully patched.
        My tests are all done now with the “bad” agent 7.6.7600.320.

        Is this one of the bugs about which nobody cares because it is not understood how it should work anyway?

        I think the issue which I raised in the original post is clarified and resolved now.

        Thank you everyone who contributed and provided ideas in relation to this setting.

        Although I see the issue resolved, please feel free to add other observations or solutions to the current behaviour for patched systems if it happens to find any.

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        • #102257 Reply

          anonymous

          Thank you for your tests, but unfortunately you may have missed an important detail: “Set Windows updates to be automatically installed.” This means use Windows (not Internet Explorer) Update setting “Install updates automatically” in step 5 at https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-change-windows-update-settings-2625778.

        • #102273 Reply

          anonymous

          @ch100: The tests that you did were not a waste of time though, since they reveal another difference. I believe though that your test result with “Install new versions automatically” unchecked probably actually did show an update for IE 10 called “Cumulative Security Update for Internet Explorer 10 ….” Also, it’s interesting to compare your results with my tests at https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/ie-install-new-versions-automatically/#post-101644, which were done on a computer with IE 11 uninstalled.

          • #102299 Reply

            ch100
            AskWoody MVP

            After posting the results of a clean install and with only the minimal number of updates installed, I went all the way and installed all patches available except for IE11.
            The behaviour does not change.
            The major difference between my recent tests and yours at https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/ie-install-new-versions-automatically/#post-101644 is related to IE11 being uninstalled.
            With IE11 uninstalled, in all instances, IE11 comes on WU as Optional. I had the same results in the same conditions.
            If only IE10 is installed and IE11 never installed, then the results are as expected
            https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/ie-install-new-versions-automatically/#post-102195

            I don’t think the mode of installing updates in WU would make any difference in the results.

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #102307 Reply

              anonymous

              @ch100: My expectation is that if one does the two tests using automatic Windows Updates on a computer that has never had IE 11 installed, the results would be as follows:

              First test: After the test is done, the latest version of the latest major version (v11) of IE is installed.

              Second test: After the test is done, the latest version of the currently installed major version (v10) of IE is installed.

              Do you agree?

            • #102313 Reply

              ch100
              AskWoody MVP

              Yes, with the addition that for the second test, IE11 will still be available as an Optional unchecked update, but not installed automatically.
              As you mentioned WU on fully Automatic, the behaviour should be as you described and the lists of Important, Recommended, Optional lose relevance.

        • #102350 Reply

          anonymous

          @ch100: I’m not sure exactly what the supposed bug is?

          • #102374 Reply

            ch100
            AskWoody MVP

            The bug mentioned seems to be that with IE11 previously installed and later uninstalled, there may be different behaviour than expected. Specifically, it appears that IE11 being previously installed is offered after it is uninstalled only as Optional regardless of the setting in IE10.
            It needs further testing because now I am not sure either.

            • #102375 Reply

              anonymous

              I believe this is not a bug; instead, it’s to prevent IE 11 from being automatically installed again after a user has uninstalled IE 11.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #102379 Reply

              ch100
              AskWoody MVP

              That is OK and it can be seen as such.

    • #102319 Reply

      anonymous

      Here are my test results using automatic Windows Updates (a question mark means the test was not done):

      1. IE setting “Install new versions automatically” = checked
      Windows Updates = automatic
      IE 11 had previously been installed = yes
      IE version before updates were automatically installed = 10.0.9200.16521
      IE version after updates were automatically installed = 10.0.9200.17609

      2. IE setting “Install new versions automatically” = unchecked
      Windows Updates = automatic
      IE 11 had previously been installed = yes
      IE version before updates were automatically installed = 10.0.9200.16521
      IE version after updates were automatically installed = 10.0.9200.17609

      3. IE setting “Install new versions automatically” = checked
      Windows Updates = automatic
      IE 11 had previously been installed = no
      IE version before updates were automatically installed = 10.x
      IE version after updates were automatically installed = ?

      4. IE setting “Install new versions automatically” = unchecked
      Windows Updates = automatic
      IE 11 had previously been installed = no
      IE version before updates were automatically installed = 10.x
      IE version after updates were automatically installed = ?

      5. IE setting “Install new versions automatically” = checked
      Windows Updates = automatic
      IE version before updates were automatically installed = 11.x
      IE version after updates were automatically installed = ?

      6. IE setting “Install new versions automatically” = unchecked
      Windows Updates = automatic
      IE version before updates were automatically installed = 11.0.9600.17843
      IE version after updates were automatically installed = 11.0.9600.18617

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #102330 Reply

      anonymous

      Here is a summary of ch100’s and my results when manually checking for Windows updates:

      7. IE setting “Install new versions automatically” = checked
      Windows Updates = manual
      IE 11 had previously been installed = yes
      IE version when Windows Update was manually run = 10.x
      IE 10 listing on manually run Windows Update = Important, checked
      IE 11 listing on manually run Windows Update = Optional, unchecked

      8. IE setting “Install new versions automatically” = unchecked
      Windows Updates = manual
      IE 11 had previously been installed = yes
      IE version when Windows Update was manually run = 10.x
      IE 10 listing on manually run Windows Update = Important, checked
      IE 11 listing on manually run Windows Update = Optional, unchecked

      9. IE setting “Install new versions automatically” = checked
      Windows Updates = manual
      IE 11 had previously been installed = no
      IE version when Windows Update was manually run = 10.x
      IE 10 listing on manually run Windows Update = Important, checked
      IE 11 listing on manually run Windows Update = Important, checked

      10. IE setting “Install new versions automatically” = unchecked
      Windows Updates = manual
      IE 11 had previously been installed = no
      IE version when Windows Update was manually run = 10.x
      IE 10 listing on manually run Windows Update = ?
      IE 11 listing on manually run Windows Update = Optional, unchecked

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #102335 Reply

      anonymous

      Summary: IE’s “Install new versions automatically” setting doesn’t matter for IE 11 users because there will be no IE 12, 13, etc. For IE 10 users, this setting can be important in some circumstances.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #102385 Reply

      anonymous

      A semi-rant: In the course of researching this setting on the web, I was disappointed in how often I encountered incorrect information.

       

    • #102399 Reply

      ch100
      AskWoody MVP

      Here is the “bug” solved.
      https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/ie-install-new-versions-automatically/#post-102350
      https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/ie-install-new-versions-automatically/#post-102374

      IE11 when uninstalled, leaves behind this registry key which is self-explanatory.

      ************************************************************************
      Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

      [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Setup\11.0]
      “DoNotOfferIE11AU”=dword:00000001

      ************************************************************************

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #102408 Reply

      abbodi86
      AskWoody MVP

      Thank you both (or all? :D)

      very interesting and satisfying results

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #102513 Reply

      anonymous

      Woody’s blog post states, “IE has the ability to ‘Install new versions automatically’ independently of Windows Update.” Actually, as far as I know, IE doesn’t have this ability. This setting controls update behavior for IE in Windows Update.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #102560 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        I believe you’re right – and changed the blog post accordingly.

    • #102536 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Lounger

      There is a related Group Policy named “Install new versions of Internet Explorer automatically,” documented at https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj891001.aspx. This Group Policy setting is stored in a different registry location (HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Main!EnableAutoUpgrade) than Internet Explorer’s setting (HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Main!EnableAutoUpgrade).

      On my computer, toggling the IE checkbox changes the latter Value’s data from 1 to 0 or vice versa. I don’t have an Internet Explorer key under HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft, perhaps because I have never changed the Group Policy setting for IE?

      • #102553 Reply

        anonymous

        Correct.

    • #102549 Reply

      b
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’d like to understand why anyone cares about any of this.

      Why is anyone still using IE10?

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #102552 Reply

        abbodi86
        AskWoody MVP

        It’s called free research

        one of the reasons, is to understand why and when IE11 gets offered as Optional or Recommended

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #102564 Reply

          b
          AskWoody Lounger

          To whom? (in practical rather than test circumstances)

          That’s what I’m trying to understand.

          Doesn’t research need a purpose?

          • #102591 Reply

            abbodi86
            AskWoody MVP

            To us interested, and whoever read this thread and find it useful 🙂

            i believe the reason i posted is a good purpose, which have been achieved now

            2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #102595 Reply

            ch100
            AskWoody MVP

            @b See my other post replying to you.
            And I would like to add that there are still people or enterprises which use the image with SP1 and IE8 as starting point and in the process of fully patching, a legitimate question is if it has merit to install IE10 first and IE11 on top of it or just IE11 on top of IE8.
            I think I have the correct answer, there is no need to install IE10 in the process, but other people may want to have a roll-back option, just in case.
            There are various scenarios and something that not a lot of people know, the result of the installation of IE11 from installer (patched or not) differs from what is achieved after fully resetting IE with its own command. The differences are so subtle than nobody complains except for those getting confused and moving to alternative browsers as a result. A lot of the features under Main registry key and some options visible under Advanced GUI change as result of a full Reset. Values like “Use software rendering instead of GPU rendering” change in the registry following Reset from DWORD to REG_SZ which is very important to understand in managed environments and the list continues. There are also inconsistencies between the 32-bit and 64-bit versions.

            3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #102597 Reply

            Noel Carboni
            AskWoody MVP

            Doesn’t research need a purpose?

            Actually, no.

            The acquisition of knowledge is reason enough for some who believe that to use something most adeptly you should know all about that something.

            You seem to ask questions without purpose… Why?

            -Noel

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #102608 Reply

              b
              AskWoody Lounger

              Doesn’t research need a purpose?

              Actually, no.

              The acquisition of knowledge is reason enough for some who believe that to use something most adeptly you should know all about that something.

              You seem to ask questions without purpose… Why?

              -Noel

              I explained why I was asking before my question, but you’ve left that out of your quote. Why?

              So your answer is that this discussion is purely theoretical with no practical purpose?

            • #102624 Reply

              Noel Carboni
              AskWoody MVP

              So your answer is that this discussion is purely theoretical with no practical purpose?

              For me it is, yet I find it interesting nonetheless.

              If nothing else, it helps us to get inside the “minds” at Microsoft who would add such options to their software.

              And it has every bit as much practical purpose as your asking about why it’s being discussed. A discussion doesn’t need a why. It needs only to be.

              -Noel

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #102687 Reply

              b
              AskWoody Lounger

              My asking why it’s being discussed had a very practical purpose: I was asked a question and invited to comment, but then couldn’t understand why.

              As to the practical purpose behind this discussion, well I guess you’ve finally confirmed that there isn’t one.

            • #102627 Reply

              Noel Carboni
              AskWoody MVP

              I explained why I was asking before my question, but you’ve left that out of your quote. Why?

              From where I sit, the two parts of your post seemed to be separate and distinct.

              Specifically, you expanded the context of your interest in why THIS particular detail was being discussed into a much broader question that stood on its own. I was simply answering the latter in an attempt to show how that answer could apply to the former.

              I have also pointed out to you – several times now – that there need be no good reason behind a discussion question besides simple curiosity, which your own posts illustrate nicely.

              -Noel

              • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  Noel Carboni.
              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #102688 Reply

              b
              AskWoody Lounger

              You wouldn’t have to point the same thing out to me twice if you didn’t split my post into two and make the same points in both replies.

            • #102735 Reply

              woody
              Da Boss

              Let’s leave it at that, shall we?

      • #102592 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody MVP

        @b
        Because you raised this issue, may I ask why Microsoft did not retire IE10 for windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2?
        As long as it is there, it is a valid product for various reasons.
        Let’s say it might be used for closed environments which need reliable access to Microsoft’s own server products, like CRM 2011 for example.

        • #102613 Reply

          b
          AskWoody Lounger

          It was retired a year ago for Windows 7:

          Stay up-to-date with Internet Explorer

          • #102623 Reply

            ch100
            AskWoody MVP

            Sorry, but there is a good chance that you have only a partial understanding of the implications of IE10 being still available on Windows Update and there is good reason why it is so.
            It is not even superseded by IE11 in Windows Update in some configurations as it was proved in this thread.
            I am not promoting IE10 or even Windows 7, but there are legitimate reasons why various users need or want to use both.

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #102668 Reply

              b
              AskWoody Lounger

              Correct, I have zero understanding of that. But you’re not doing a whole lot to educate me about it, are you?

              I guess I’ll have to re-read the whole thread if there was really some explanation that IE10 would not be upgraded to IE11 with automatic updates selected. (I find that difficult to believe.)

              Why would IE10 still be available if there have been no updates for it on Windows 7 for over a year?

              Good reason? Legitimate reasons? Are they secret or just deliberately vague?

      • #102653 Reply

        anonymous

        If Microsoft had documented this setting properly, this topic probably wouldn’t exist.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #102709 Reply

        anonymous

        IE 10 is still being updated for some versions of Windows. For example, see http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=KB4012204.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #102754 Reply

          b
          AskWoody Lounger

          Embedded and Server, yes. But not Windows 7.

    • #102558 Reply

      Microfix
      AskWoody Lounger

      A bit of a tangent but, related to Internet Explorer AND security for W7 / W8:

      Just done a search for ‘Windows 8 x64 March 2017’ on the MS Update Catalog and all except IE March patches are there, wouldn’t it have made more sense to include the IE update for March within the month of March since MS have now made IE updates a satellite patch?

      Considering that IE is integral for both OSes, this could be a potential pitfall for many.

       

      | x64 Group B: W7 Pro & W8.1 Pro | | x64 Group W: 3 x Linux Hybrids | | x86 Windows XP Pro |
        No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #102598 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody MVP

        Windows 8 or Windows 8.1? I assume it is the latest.
        I think the patch for IE11 for March 2017 is included in the monthly rollup.

        • #102625 Reply

          Microfix
          AskWoody Lounger

          See my signature, for Group B (Security only)

          | x64 Group B: W7 Pro & W8.1 Pro | | x64 Group W: 3 x Linux Hybrids | | x86 Windows XP Pro |
            No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
      • #102604 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        Try using “Internet Explorer 11” for your search instead of “Windows”.
        Sort by date.
        It is there.
        http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=internet+Explorer+11

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #102703 Reply

      anonymous

      “Internet Explorer 10 Delivery Through Automatic Updates” – https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-edge/jj898508.aspx

      “Internet Explorer 11 Delivery Through Automatic Updates” – https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-edge/dn449235

      “Microsoft gets silent upgrade religion, will push IE auto-updates” (2011) – http://www.computerworld.com/article/2500390/desktop-apps/microsoft-gets-silent-upgrade-religion–will-push-ie-auto-updates.html

      The first two links don’t mention the IE setting.

    • #102786 Reply

      driftless
      AskWoody Lounger

      Some companies wrote extranets for earlier versions of IE. I don’t see this much anymore, but quite recently, one of my users was told that he had to run IE8, nothing later, or the site wouldn’t work. (He has managed to get along without it.) Is that misfeasance or malfeasance? I’d lean toward the latter. Along with banking sites that require a JRE on the client side. What could go wrong?

      Imagine, at least for a brief moment, how much pain and sorrow could have been prevented if MS had never tried to weld a browser into its OSs.

      • #102793 Reply

        Noel Carboni
        AskWoody MVP

        I’m not sure the fault was with “welding it in” to the OS so much as their goal and ideal that active content needed to be able to execute software on the client system, and that the world would just provide all this wonderful, integrated web software for people to run freely and automatically, with no problems or malware introduced. Frankly it was a nice idea; it just didn’t adequately anticipate all the predators out there.

        Today we hear about well-defined sandboxes where unvetted software from abroad can be run with limited capabilities and reduced risk, and even walled gardens of App Stores where only vetted software can be found – yet malware reports abound. Now we hear of “ransomware” in which baddies take over your data and extort money from you.

        Personally I am configured so that I don’t let anything (except the most basic scripting) run automatically from sites abroad, and the list of sites my systems are allowed to contact is sharply limited by well-managed blacklists that are updated daily. On top of that I practice conscientious computing – i.e., I don’t download and run just any old software I find. And guess what? So far no malware has knocked at my door at all.

        I liken browsing to visiting the nasty neighborhoods on the seedy side of town. You can dress up in a hazmat suit and put on a bullet-proof vest then go strolling around down there knocking on doors, but you STILL can be hurt.

        Or you can program your GPS to route you around the bad parts of town and stay much safer. You might even be able to do without the hazmat suit and be more comfortable.

        Avoiding running software from abroad, being smart about what you download/run, and blacklisting bad sites is a strategy that really works.

        -Noel

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #102804 Reply

          ch100
          AskWoody MVP

          Avoiding running software from abroad

          The definition of “abroad” is very difficult to define in this context. 🙂

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #102888 Reply

            Noel Carboni
            AskWoody MVP

            The definition of “abroad” is very difficult to define in this context.

            Why? I don’t really find it so.

            ANYTHING you explicitly download from anywhere should be treated with suspicion and vetted before allowed to run on a critical (or even casual) system. And add in a dose of “If it sounds like a deal that’s too good to be true, it probably is.

            I suggest you allow nothing to run automatically that’s not explicitly been brought onto your computer by you, or at least pre-approved. I’m talking about avoiding ActiveX, toolbars, plug-ins, etc. Browsers generally offer configuration settings to help you accomplish that. I know IE does.

            I don’t usually go to great lengths of suspicion over software packages from big names, like Adobe, or updates for software I’ve used for a long time – but if I’m considering running new software from some small ABC company I do a little bit of homework first. Use your head.

            It’s akin to not walking blithely into a minefield.

            By vetting I mean to do some searches online, scan downloaded files for malware, visit virustotal.com, and even ask on a forum with experts, “Anyone use program NNN? Is it any good?”

            Also as a rule I disable automatic updaters AFTER software is installed. Ideally there will be overt settings provided that let you choose to hear about it if there’s a new version available – but NOT auto-install it – and you can re-vet the software or choose to bring it in when your risk is minimized. But services that always go and autonomously check for available new versions to be installed whenever THEY want? Uh uh. No! Microsoft included. Then at intervals, sometimes infrequent – and depending on when I can spare the time – I go looking for updates for software I use a lot.

            There are many good pieces of software out there that can enrich your Windows experience, both from commercial vendors and also free. You just have to be a bit careful and you can have a malware-free system.

            It’s all just common sense. And it works.

            -Noel

      • #102800 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody MVP

        JRE is OK, IE8 is not.
        The limitation of using IE8 can be worked around by using IE11 Enterprise Mode, which is a configuration not normally used by home users.
        I would say that a site which is available on the internet and does not support IE11 is not to be trusted and as such should be avoided.
        Internal sites are different and they should be treated as noted before, by using enterprise techniques designed on purpose for those situations.

    • #102789 Reply

      anonymous

      This thread has the claim that when using IE 10 on Windows 7, a tab sometimes opens insisting that users upgrade to IE 11: https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windows/en-US/000aa6d7-9ccb-46fd-b5a2-8c7251319909/prevent-ie10-from-opening-a-new-tab-offering-ie11?forum=ieitprocurrentver.

      • #102798 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody MVP

        It is likely that this has nothing to do with Windows configuration, but rather with a Microsoft service advertising IE11.
        On some systems, even having IE11 installed, a Microsoft ad for Edge would pop-up, even if that browser is not supported on those systems.

    • #102854 Reply

      driftless
      AskWoody Lounger

      JRE is OK, IE8 is not. The limitation of using IE8 can be worked around by using IE11 Enterprise Mode, which is a configuration not normally used by home users. I would say that a site which is available on the internet and does not support IE11 is not to be trusted and as such should be avoided. Internal sites are different and they should be treated as noted before, by using enterprise techniques designed on purpose for those situations.

      JRE is not OK, IMHO, representing a significant increase in attack surface, a descent into update hell, etc.

      An extranet is not really an internal site, and a bad practice is a bad practice.

      A browser is, or should be, just another application. A browser update should not require two OS reboots, as IE updates sometimes do.

      • #102871 Reply

        ch100
        AskWoody MVP

        You are just making your life harder than it should be.

    • #114430 Reply

      owdrtn
      AskWoody Lounger

      Try using “Internet Explorer 11” for your search instead of “Windows”.
      Sort by date.
      It is there.
      http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=internet+Explorer+11

      @PKCake, are you aware if the Catalog support at least some basic boolean operator ? time wasted browsing this horribly inefficient, yet useful portal is terrible

      • #114441 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP
        • #114449 Reply

          owdrtn
          AskWoody Lounger

          ?? .. I mean operator such as -, *, ?, OR, AND, (), etc..
          (- (negate) would be particularly useful..)

          • #114454 Reply

            PKCano
            AskWoody MVP

            Type in “Internet Explorer 11” – %20 is a space.
            NO operators needed. Try it.

            • #114481 Reply

              owdrtn
              AskWoody Lounger

              %20 is just some universal HTML URL Encoding query string.
              What i’m referring to is the support of “search operators”, to be typed in their search field area (since the catalog comes with no advanced search nor any custom filtering feature other than the column sorting one)

              some exemple of such operator:
              ie: using Boolean operators such as exclusion (“-xx”), alternatives (“xx OR yy OR zz”), and wildcards (“Winston * Churchill” returns “Winston Churchill”, “Winston Spencer Churchill”, etc.) src

              Such operator would allow much more fine tuned results, filtering out almost any unwanted results using simple custom operators (ie.. -x86 -server -embbeded, etc..)
              Anyway, my guess here is that’s intentional from M$.. yet just one more incentive to use their new Rollup model and/or Upgrade to 10

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