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  • Initial Apple M1 SoC Support Aims For Linux 5.13 Kernel

    Home Forums AskWoody support Non-Windows operating systems macOS Initial Apple M1 SoC Support Aims For Linux 5.13 Kernel

    • This topic has 9 replies, 3 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago.
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      • #2356406
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Will you install Linux on a M1 Mac ?

        While the independent effort to get the Apple M1 ARM-based SoC working under Linux has just been happening for a few months, with the upcoming Linux 5.13 cycle the very preliminary support for Apple’s M1 and initial M1-powered devices looks to land.

        Since earlier this year have been a few rounds of Apple M1 Linux kernel patches for bringing up the essential drivers needed to get the Linux kernel booting on the 2020 Mac Mini, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air powered by the in-house Apple Silicon. It’s in good enough shape that this very early code is likely to indeed land for Linux 5.13, which in turn will debut as stable in the June timeframe…

      • #2356422
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Alex, Maybe this has come up already somewhere else, but if so I’ve must missed it:

        This “Linux for M1 Macs” will have to be installed in dual-boot with macOS, right? Isn’t there some barrier that Apple may have built against running non-Apple operating systems in Macs?

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2356442
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        This “Linux for M1 Macs” will have to be installed in dual-boot with macOS, right?

        Doesn’t seem so at this stage. Bootcamp on M1 is not supported (yet?).
        Is seems like VM maybe the answer.

      • #2357940
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Alex, I have one new question about running Linux on an M1 Mac:

        It is my understanding that Linux has been, from its very beginnings, designed to run on machines with Intel CPUs, although it has been ported over the years to run on computers with other types, so there is at least one version that runs on ARM machines (“Clear Linux”), and some that run even on Commodore computers.

        So now I would like to know if one can run any of the most common distros, that are meant for computers with Intel CPUs, also on M1 Macs from inside a VM, “Parallels”, for example?

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2357949
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        So now I would like to know if one can run any of the most common distros, that are meant for computers with Intel CPUs, also on M1 Macs from inside a VM, “Parallels”, for example?

        Yes, can run the ARM versions any of the most common distros in VM.
        Read my post about Parallels for M1 with Windows/Linux support and watch the YouTube video 🙂

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Alex5723.
        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Alex5723.
        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Alex5723.
        • #2357990
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Alex: Are there any ARM versions of commonly used versions of distros of Linux that are not for servers, but for PCs?

          Examples of what I mean by “commonly used versions of distros … for PCs”: Mint, Ubuntu, Fedora, SUSE for PCs.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

          • #2358065
            Alex5723
            AskWoody Plus

            With Parallels Desktop 16.5 for Mac, users can not only run Windows 10 on ARM Insider Preview in a virtual machine on M1 Mac computers but also Linux distributives Ubuntu 20.04, Kali Linux 2021.1, Debian 10.7 and Fedora Workstation 33-1.2.

            ARM versions like shown in the YouTube video.

          • #2358105
            Ascaris
            AskWoody MVP

            Oscar,

            Many servers are PCs… they may have many more CPU cores and RAM than what you would find on a typical desktop, not to mention the storage, but there’s nothing I know of that is fundamentally different about them. Server-oriented distros just have different default settings and packages that are included, but it’s still mostly the same under the surface.

            There are ARM versions for several common Linux distros for desktop use. Mint is not one of them, but Ubuntu, Debian, Manjaro, and Fedora (and surely others) have ARM versions.

            Note that the hang-up in getting ARM Linux to work on a M1 Mac is not that there is some fundamental incompatibility, apparently, but that the various bits of the M1 are not off-the-shelf components for which there are already drivers in Linux, so someone had to write the drivers and get them approved for inclusion in the kernel before it would “just work” out of the box.

            Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.21.5 User Edition)

            • #2358269
              OscarCP
              AskWoody Plus

              Ascaris, so, to make very sure I understand what you are saying, because to me this is really important to get right: the Linux for ARM CPUs, let’s say, although they are said to be “for servers” (or else my only finding them mentioned in relation to servers), definitely will run also on any ordinary, made for us common home users and tinkerers, ARM PC. Correct?

              And thanks for explaining what is going on with Linux for the M1 Macs.

              Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

              • #2358276
                Ascaris
                AskWoody MVP

                I am not sure exactly what you are asking, but I do try to avoid superlatives like “definitely,” as there are always unknown exceptions just waiting to make a liar of me!

                If you buy am ARM device that is meant to be a server, you can use it as a desktop PC if you wish too, though it may lack a lot of desktop-oriented features. You can install a more desktop-oriented flavor of Linux on it as long as that distro has built the various packages for ARM, and if the drivers for Linux are there.

                The reason I think the ARM machines in what would otherwise be the “PC” (x86) market are usually mentioned in a server context is that for Linux, that’s where most of the action is. Linux has a relatively small slice of the desktop market, but a big one of the server market.

                For us desktop users, the problem we are liable to run into on ARM is that many of the Linux programs we use (from somewhere other than the distro’s repo) are compiled for x86, and without something like Apple’d Rosetta 2, they won’t work. Regular Windows programs that work now via WINE won’t work on ARM, though if the Windows ARM platform really took off, it could be that Linux ARM users would be able to use WINE to run the Windows ARM versions.

                 

                Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.21.5 User Edition)

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