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  • iPad guide for Windows users who want to switch

    Home Forums AskWoody blog iPad guide for Windows users who want to switch

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      • #2171657 Reply
        woody
        Da Boss

        Another amazing, hard-knocks rundown from Nathan Parker, edited by @PKCano. If you’re thinking of moving from Windows to an iPad, there are many trick
        [See the full post at: iPad guide for Windows users who want to switch]

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      • #2171708 Reply
        R
        AskWoody Lounger

        For home users, an iPad is often more than enough. Especially if you buy one with 128 GB of storage (or even more if you have the cash…). I myself notice that I have more ‘pc-less’ days in the week since I use an iPad (Pro). Mostly, I work online and write stuff in Word. An iPad is perfect for that! For the rest I use a Mac (switched to that after some years fighting with Windows and a handfull of narrow escapes with this instable OS…) when there is need fot a larger screen. But really: if you’re used to an older Windows 7 computer, an iPad is a HUGE improvement with much more options, packed in a user friendly user interface. And a lot faster too… Keep in mind dat most users will not need a Pro, the ‘standard’ iPad and iPad Air will be more than sufficient in most cases.

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      • #2171738 Reply
        AlexEiffel
        AskWoody_MVP

        Great guide.

        I would just emit a few caveat.

        Be careful when buying an Ipad if you care about security. Support has varied between models, generally not reaching 6 years. After that, no IOS update, except maybe an occasional security patch, but it is not clear at all what state of unpatched you find yourself in when not running the latest IOS version. I can’t find clear information about that. It seems like a lot of identified vulnerabilities that are patched in the latest IOS version don’t get patched in the previous ones.

        So, with that in mind, buying the cheapest Ipad doesn’t seem at all like a good value, because due to the age of its processor, you get about 2 years less of support if the previous pattern of support holds. Depending on how much you pay for the Ipad Air, it might be a much better value if you plan on not continuing to use your Ipad once it doesn’t get IOS updates. The cost per year could be lower for a much better model : twice the storage at basic model, laminated screen, thinner and lighter, bigger screen. Don’t get me wrong, the 10.2 Ipad is a great Ipad, the only problem is the cost per year that might not make sense. If you give it to a kid to play and security is not a big concern, then it might make sense since IOS is still a pretty secure platform and we don’t hear much about out of date Ipads being hacked.

        Also, the Ipad Pros are very old now since they don’t use the latest processors and one should definitely wait for the replacement before shelling that much money into them, even if the actual models are very good.

        Lastly, I would say that for me, and I love the Ipad, I really can’t describe that as a viable alternative to Windows 7. Those are two completely different products for very different uses, in my view. Depending on what you are doing with a computer, you might be very disappointed if you hoped to replace your computer with an Ipad. It is terrible at file management, you can’t be productive in Excel with this, multi windows is not close to the experience you get on a desktop, especially if you use a dual monitors setup. For writing maybe, reading, using social medias and browsing, it is great. I always have my Ipad close to look up something on the Internet and for reading. But I still need a computer, even if I use it much less often at home because of the Ipad. At least, I don’t need to get up and go sit at the desk every time I want to ask the Internet something.

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        • #2171836 Reply
          R
          AskWoody Lounger

          Support of six years is more than what most alternatives offer, take for example Chromebooks. Besides, after 6 years(!) of use, it’s probably really time for a new device. Having said that, all iOS devices that run the current version of Apple’s OS, also run iOS 14. So wouldn’t worry about that aspect at all. For the rest: Apple DOES roll out updates for older versions of iOS in case of need.

          What you said about the cheaper models iPad’s: they also will get support for years to come. It’s not so much about the SoC, but much more about the amount of RAM. 2GB is now the standard; the Pro’s will even have a longer lifespan with 4 or even 6 GB. Wouldn’t really worry about the things you write. I use iPad’s for years. End of last year I bought an iPad Pro 11, to move an older iPad to my wife who – indeed – said goodbye to Windows 7. I could have waited until spring this year, when new Pro’s might be released (if they even are delivered on time with the Corona mess going on in China, that is). The thing is: the differences between the models are not that big for most work done on them. It’s more in things like camera’s (but really: besides using it as a document scanner, is anyone really taking photos with a tablet…?), connections etc. Theoretically the SoC’s in a new generation are faster, but it takes a long time before developers catch up with that. Mainly because they produce software that has to run smoothly on ALL models.

          Just choose the iPad that suits your budget and don’t get stressed about ‘what if’. Many Windows 10 laptops are basically long out of support too, because of missing drivers for certain built-in hardware. Even Microsoft’s own Surface devices are supported for only a few years, and those things are MUCH more expensive than the midpriced iPad’s…

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          • #2171871 Reply
            Myst
            AskWoody Plus

            all iOS devices that run the current version of Apple’s OS, also run iOS 14.

            Not all devices running the latest iOS will get iOS 14. I have an iPad Air2 on iPadOS 13.3.1, and according to various reports it won’t get iOS 14. MacRumors has a list of compatible devices for the upcoming iOS 14.

            https://www.macrumors.com/roundup/ios-14/

            Win7 SP1 Home 64-bit, GrpA / MacOS / Chromebook

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          • #2172066 Reply
            AlexEiffel
            AskWoody_MVP

            If you look here, you will see some interesting facts about support lifetime:

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPad

            The first Ipad was supported 2 years and 5 months. I know someone who bought one not right after its release date and he wasn’t able to use it for what he wanted after less than 2 years. Pretty frustrating to be an early adopter. One important app wasn’t working if you didn’t have the latest IOS release.

            Also, I advised someone to get an on sale Ipad mini 2 a few years ago because the mini 4 was way too expensive for what it was and for how long it would last based on the moment bought, knowing that if bought at this time the mini2 wouldn’t last 3 years and it didn’t. It just made sense, sadly for wasting resources, to buy the very cheap mini2 at a lower cost per year for less than 3 years and wait for a suitable replacement to the underwhelming but much more expensive mini4.

            I also thought the new Ipad (cheap entry level) 5th gen was a great deal when it came out, just like the Iphone SE which had the same good processor as other Iphones for much less. But the 7th gen Ipad with the same old A10 processor will probably not have as much years of support as the 5th gen that was released two years prior, so is this as good as a deal? I don’t think so. I doubt Apple will stop supporting the Ipad 7th gen at the same time as the Ipad Air 3rd gen, but I might be wrong. It is interesting to note that apart from the A12 processor, the Air also have 3GB of RAM instead of 2GB like the entry level Ipad 7th gen.

            You are right in pointing that maybe RAM could be more of an issue than processor and that newer models might last longer than before since they are more capable than earlier devices. But we don’t know for sure. I also agree about the capabilities of the devices which are fine for most people. All current Ipads are great for many people use case. My issue is only with what Apple decide to do with support. I just think a buyer needs to consider the possibility that buying the latest cheapest Ipad that runs on older technology might not be such a great deal. It is very possible that the Ipad Air cost per year might be lower for a significantly better device at base specs, even if one doesn’t fully benefit from bigger RAM, faster processor and twice the storage amount (64gb vs 32gb). The lighter weight, the thinner aspect, the bigger screen, those are nice perks if you pay less per year in exchange for more upfront. This of course depends on current pricing where you live.

            As to patching older IOS versions, if you can find a source that confirms that all security vulnerabilities are addressed in older IOS versions, I would be happy to see it. I think that Apple is too secretive about this and they might only patch the most critical vulnerabilities like what Microsoft did with XP and that makes experts say don’t run XP or 7 past its expiration date. People can argue about the real world risk based on usage for Windows or IOS, but I don’t think it is something that can just be brushed off without any second thought. If an underlying vulnerability not patched makes your browsing unsafe, does your device still fulfill your need adequately? If your device can get infected and you use a banking app on it, do you feel as comfortable?

            If you understand what is happening and you decide to use the device past its expiration date, that is fine, but companies need to not put security as a second thought because they don’t feel like the device should run the latest version of their OS. I think Apple should commit to patching devices for security for 6 years, period, and not let people buy brand new Iphones that won’t run the latest IOS version in a year or two without people knowing what it implies. If they fully patched previous IOS versions so devices last 6 years or more from the moment they are bought on whatever IOS version they can support, and if Apple clearly indicated when support for security ends, that would be great. I expect more from this company that says they value privacy and that sells what is considered premium products, even the cheapest.

            I agree that for those type of mobile devices, 6 years is not bad. But I find 4 years short for a brand new Ipad and for which there is no hardware reason why it should last for a short amount of time. I am used to having computers lasting more than 10 years. Things haven’t changed much for a lot of typical use scenarios. We are talking about replacing Windows 7 with a device that is quite different. I wouldn’t buy the Chromebooks or Surface you evoke for this reason, so comparisons to those throw away products don’t seem fair to me, although you are right pointing they are expensive and indirectly saying they might not be a good value. When I buy laptops, they last a long time and I want it that way, so Surface is out of the question for me, especially with the way Microsoft handled the issues they had over the years with them. And my devices last a very long time because I precisely choose them to be like this : reliable and powerful where it counts. Our 6 years old laptops often run faster than the cheap brand new things that people typically buy. And before Windows 10, those were install them, set them up properly, lock them tight and forget them with no afterthought.

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            • #2172073 Reply
              PKCano
              Da Boss

              I bought my iPad Mini2 on May 10th of 2013.
              Perfect size for traveling.
              It has just now, in 2020, not qualified for iPad OS 13, but I have received a couple of security updates.
              Everything on it still works.

              I’d call that pretty good service.

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              • #2172208 Reply
                AlexEiffel
                AskWoody_MVP

                Yes, that is great. The mini2 I advised to buy was very cheap and it didn’t last in terms of support because it was already bought far after the initial release date, but it was still overall a good deal due to the price.

                And yes, it still works right now and it received a few security updates on IOS 12. I was surprised to see a few updates after IOS13 was out. I would love to think that Apple now continue to support their older versions of IOS for security adequately and maybe they now do it since IOS 12, but nobody can answer this question properly and Apple are not clearly stating anything either.

                Are Safari vulnerabilities patched on IOS 12 right now?

                All you get from Apple is :

                iOS 12.4.5
                This update has no published CVE entries.

                https://support.apple.com/en-ca/HT201222

                 

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            • #2172261 Reply
              R
              AskWoody Lounger

              I think you must also look at some other aspects. If you’d buy an iPad for €600…€1200 and this device would be supported for 6 years, that means it’d cost you €100…€200 per year. That’s pretty ok, I think. Many iPad’s (and other portable devices for that matter…) don’t even reach that age, because people drop and destroy them 😉 Also there is the dreaded battery that after 3 years or so will start to become a problem. Replacing is an option, but is if REALLY worth it?

              If you want a bit more certainty, go for a Pro. But if you buy a ‘standard’ iPad for €400 which ‘survives’ 4 years in matter of support, it’ll cost you only €100 per year too. So in the end that’s  quite neat too I think. Also: moving from an old to a new iPad is very easy process. Backup the  old one, restore to the new one, wait  while and you’re in business again. No stressful new installations, lost settings, documents, photos etc. Just copy & go. Try that with a Windows laptop…

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      • #2171793 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        So the next suggestion would be “How to replace your Windows PC with an iPhone”?

         

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      • #2171800 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        I want one that runs MacOS as that New iPadOS is just not there yet for my usage model. I’ve got to be able to install Blender 3D, Gimp, Krita, Inkscape, etc. And Blender 3D 2.8 has some great 2D animation workflow/feature sets in addition to all the 3D animation/graphics feature sets and other video compositor features as well. So an iPad running MacOS and that’s the minimum for me as iPadOS is just too iOS like currently and I do not like applications that are only offered via some App Store like ecosystem and I probably never will.

        And Apple maybe get some Ray Tracing hardware blocks included in your Apple custom Graphics on your A series processors for tablets as well. You’ve already got some Tensor Cores/NPUs IP on your bionic branded processors but I really want a Graphics Oriented tablet that’s running MacOS and my choice of Open Source graphics applications.

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      • #2171846 Reply
        Zaphyrus
        AskWoody Lounger

        Remember that  before doing any drastic change to Mac or Linux, have in mind  what things do you usually do in a computer.  for example, Windows is good if your prefer gaming,  Mac is good if you like to design stuff,

        if its for normal work, any OS is fine.

        Just someone who don't want Windows to mess with its computer.
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      • #2173452 Reply
        Nathan Parker
        AskWoody_MVP

        Thanks everyone for the feedback!

        I decided to two two guides, one for Macs and one for iPads. Depending on usage needs, I’ve found some people I’ve moved from Windows to Apple gear can transition to an iPad instead of running a full Mac. Others that need the additional power user functionality need to use a full Mac.

        In terms of iOS/iPadOS Support, I gave my mother my old iPad Air with an A7 chip, and even though it hasn’t received iPadOS 13, it is still receiving security patches in iOS 12. Apple’s even gone back and updated older iOS versions with security patches occasionally. Security patching and longer term usage with updates has gotten way better than in the past.

        In terms of the cheap iPad models, I’ve found they’re OK and still last long in terms of OS support and updates for casual users. If my mother’s hand me down iPad Air dies, I’ll likely replace it with a cheap iPad since that’d be ideal for her needs. The new iPad Airs are good for those who need a little more oomph without shelling out the funds for an iPad Pro.

        Nathan Parker

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