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  • It is possible to upgrade the 64-bit version of Linux Mint 19.3 to version 20

    Posted on Alex5723 Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Non-Windows operating systems Linux – all distros It is possible to upgrade the 64-bit version of Linux Mint 19.3 to version 20

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      • #2279063 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        No need to clean install.

        If you’ve been waiting for this I’d like to thank you for your patience.

        It is now possible to upgrade the 64-bit version of Linux Mint 19.3 to version 20.

        The upgrade instructions are available at: https://community.linuxmint.com/tutorial/view/2485

        https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3946

        • This topic was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by Alex5723.
        • This topic was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by Alex5723.
        5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2279074 Reply
        BATcher
        AskWoody_MVP

        It would be interesting to hear opinions about whether the Windows concept of a ‘clean install’, often recommended, applies also to Linux distros like Mint, in the same sort of way.

        I know that some Linux distros allow only a clean install, so it is Jolly Good that Mint can do an ‘upgrade in place’, admittedly a short time after the clean-install is available.

        BATcher

        Data is not the plural of anecdote...

      • #2279460 Reply
        DrBonzo
        AskWoody Plus

        The instructions for the in-place upgrade from 19.3 to 20.0 seem very complicated to me. Even the blog says the in-place upgrade is not for inexperienced users.

        I’m wondering why it’s so complicated. I did an in-place upgrade of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS to 18.04 LTS and 20 minutes after clicking a button to start the process I was up and running 18.04. All of my data, files, and settings carried over flawlessly and seamlessly, even my printer. All I had to do was tell the update manager where to look for Opera updates and that was it. Done!

        I wonder if there’s any chance Mint will come out with an upgrade procedure similar to the one used by Ubuntu.

        • #2279471 Reply
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          The instructions for the in-place upgrade from 19.3 to 20.0 seem very complicated to me. Even the blog says the in-place upgrade is not for inexperienced users.

          It is not likely that Mint will change the upgrade process very much, if at all. Previous Mint upgrades have been about the same as this.

          I did the upgrade from Kubuntu 18.04 to 20.04, via 19.10 (as this was months ago, and I was not willing to wait ’til July as Ubuntu said I would have to if I wanted to go from one LTS to another), and it was similar to the Mint update process from 19.3 to 20, which I did yesterday. It was a command-line operation to upgrade to 20.04, so there was no button to click as you mentioned when you upgraded to 18.04. This was right after 20.04 was released, so that was a couple of months ago.

          In essence, the Mint process is to make sure you’re fully updated, then copy and paste these commands into the terminal window, one by one:

          sudo apt install mintupgrade
          
          mintupgrade check
          
          mintupgrade download
          
          mintupgrade upgrade

          The first one installs the Mint updater.

          The second one does a dry-run of the update, simulating it to let you know of any potential errors before any changes are made. If you’re nervous about potentially messing things up, you could do this and see whether it came up with any errors, or if it finished the simulated upgrade with no errors. If there is an error message, you could copy and paste it here and someone should be able to help. Your system will not have been changed yet.

          The next line downloads the packages needed for the upgrade, but does not install them yet. I am not sure why or whether that is really necessary (as opposed to doing it all with the final step), but that’s what the page says to do.

          The final line does the actual upgrade. That’s the one with the potential to mess things up.

          The upgrader will abort if you have not configured Timeshift, which is a pretty obnoxious thing (especially if they are saying this process is not for beginners… an advanced user does not need to be forced to have a backup before an upgrade! Either he has one or he knows the risk he is taking. Either way, his choice).

          I posted a message yesterday on how to bypass that if you want to have it not check for Timeshift, though you really should have a backup of some sort before proceeding. Timeshift works nicely, and I do strongly advise to have a Timeshift or other backup before proceeding… I just object people trying to force me to do things “for my own good.”  (I had a Veeam backup that was current for my Mint installation, FWIW).

          If you have Timeshift or another system backup, you could proceed with those commands I cited above, and it would have a good chance of working with no issues.

          I did run into a minor issue when I did the upgrade yesterday, where the updater was choking on some dependency issue and failing with an error message, so I just ran the regular Mint updater (from the shield icon in the system tray) and had it do its thing (it had a lot of files to update!), then ran the ‘mintupgrade’ command again in the terminal, after which it finished with no errors. The upgraded Mint works nicely.

          Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

          • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 3 days ago by Ascaris.
          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2279506 Reply
            Ascaris
            AskWoody_MVP

            Shoot, I do not know why the thing took my four lines of commands and made it one line.

            The commands should be:

            (when I copy and paste the mooshed together thing, it pastes looking like I left it!)

            sudo apt install mintupgrade

            mintupgrade check

            mintupgrade download

            mintupgrade upgrade

            Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

            2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2279739 Reply
        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        As @firemind noted in another thread, it is now possible to launch the upgrade via the GUI. I don’t know how much the process differs from the command line version, as I did the “official” version listed on the Mint site (though it is hard to imagine being more official than pressing the button the Mint devs put there!).

        I should have remembered that when you asked about a simpler way to launch it, @DrBonzo, but it was one of those things where I had already started the procedure from the command line, so even though I did see the button, I didn’t need to use it, so it didn’t stick in my mind. Sorry about that!

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2279894 Reply
          firemind
          AskWoody Lounger

          Unfortunately the notice on System Reports is just a link to the blog notice – and it comes back after reboots if you don’t ignore it.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2279940 Reply
            Ascaris
            AskWoody_MVP

            Ah, ok. Thanks for letting us know!

            FWIW, I am currently upgrading my KDE Neon installation to the 20.04 base (for testing purposes; it is not released yet) on my G3. I like to do testing on actual bare-metal hardware, and the G3 is the one that has the nVidia Optimus graphics, and that’s the thing I really want to verify is working.

            The rebase to 20.04 is essentially like the Kubuntu upgrade from 18.04 to 20.04, or a Mint upgrade from 19.3 to 20, but there’s one difference (and that’s why it is called a rebase and not just a new release).

            Neon uses the newest Ubuntu LTS base, though with a few months’ delay after the new LTS is released.  The current release version of Neon is based on Ubuntu 18.04, but the 20.04 is coming (which is why they are requesting testing).  All of the stuff that differentiates Neon from a minimal install of Ubuntu, the stuff added/modified downstream by KDE, is on a rolling release basis. As soon as KDE releases the new version of Plasma, the KDE framework, or the KDE application suite, it is made available to Neon that same day or the one following.  They also package some other things that are not KDE software, like much newer versions of Qt than you would find in Kubuntu.

            That means that for Neon, there’s no direct equivalent of Mint 20, which is the new Ubuntu 20.04 base with the newest Mint changes on top of that.  Neon always has the latest non-Ubuntu changes if you keep it up to date.  That just leaves the base version upgrade every other year.

            Fortunately, Neon has a nice graphical update button that appears to be what @DrBonzo saw when going from 16.04 to 18.04. You need to make that button pop up with two copy/paste lines into the terminal (I imagine that will change when the rebased Neon is released), but after you do, all it takes is a log out/in and a dialog pops up to let you know that the upgrade is available, and with a button to press to start the process.

            It’s kind of strange that KDE Neon would be friendly like that where Mint isn’t, given that Neon still isn’t considered to be an actual distro by its developers. They see it more as a technology preview and test bed for their own software, but then they have a “User” edition (the one I am using).

            Now it’s completed, and the G3 has booted into the new version. No idea how well it works yet!

            Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.19.4).

            1 user thanked author for this post.
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