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  • It’s the end of the line for Office 2010

    Posted on Tracey Capen Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody blog It’s the end of the line for Office 2010

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      • #2305296 Reply
        Tracey Capen
        AskWoody MVP

        PATCH WATCH By Susan Bradley Microsoft is closing the book on two business workhorses: Office 2010 and Exchange 2010. From a productivity-app perspect
        [See the full post at: It’s the end of the line for Office 2010]

        5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2305380 Reply
        Seff
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks Susan.

        Just a reminder that while Microsoft doesn’t offer extended paid-for protection for Office 2010 as it does for Windows 7, 0patch Pro does cover both.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2305424 Reply
        Canadian Tech
        AskWoody_MVP

        These comments apply only to the typical home user installation…

        In days gone by, a copy of Microsoft Office on a home PC was a necessity. It is how letters got written. The document is now replaced by email. Sometimes emails come with attached documents (prepared by someone else) or a PowerPoint presentation. Not very common, but sometimes people actually know enough and care enough to prepare an Excel spread sheet. No one prepares a PPT, only watches.

        Most do not really need Office, but it can be convenient if it is there, but hardly worth spending $100 or more or $25 per year. An old copy of 2000, 2003, 2007, or 2010 is more than adequate. In 2010, most of my clients got their legal licences for $105 for 3 PCs. Perpetual licences. In today’s world, if you do not have an old copy, you download a free copy of a substitute that is more than adequate to meet the need.

        The “loss” of Microsoft “support,” is a non-event. Could even be a good thing. These versions are very stable and in servicing hundreds of PCs for 18 years now, I have never seen a case where un-patched copies caused a problem. I have seen cases of patches that caused problems.

        Remember, I said home installation, not an enterprise.

        Bottom line, what Microsoft now does to their new or old versions is a non-issue.

        CT

      • #2305493 Reply
        Charlie
        AskWoody Plus

        When I was working back in the 90’s, most people in the company including myself used a combination of either Lotus 123, Amipro, Wordperfect, Word, or Excel.  I really liked when they came out with Lotus SmartSuite ’97 and I got really good at it.  At some point, to avoid the conflicts arising from employees using various programs, it was decided that we all standardize on Microsoft Office or at least Word and Excel.  I learned how to use Word and  Excel at that time.  We used Office XP and wasn’t too bad, and after awhile I got used to it.  I was one of the many who hated what they did to Office in 2007!

        Now retired since 2010, I still use Lotus SmartSuite ’97 that came on a CD that came with an IBM Aptiva computer I bought in 1997.  I now have it on a Thinkpad with Win XP, along with Office 2003 that I got as a gift from my brother.  As you may have guessed, I prefer to use the Lotus 123 and Wordpro for my own personal home use.  I have Word, Excel, and Powerpoint from Office 2010 on my newest computer with Win 7.  They have been mainly a convenience for me to open Word documents and on rare occasions, an Excel or Powerpoint file.  MS does what they want, and I do what I want, and I’ve never had any problems.

        Group L

        7 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2305521 Reply
          Microfix
          AskWoody MVP

          Wow charlie, been there working with Amipro, Lotus 123 et al, you stuck a chord with me in that post.
          Brings back good memories when things just worked without interruption thru the 90’s
          Still have Lotus smartsuite running on my XP pro installation..which I use for sensitive info (not net connected)
          RIP amipro my favourite wordprocessor – the floppies died yeeeeears ago and are long gone 🙁

          No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
          • #2306144 Reply
            Charlie
            AskWoody Plus

            It was very nice of IBM to include that Lotus SmartSuite ’97 CD with the computer I bought.  I still have that CD.  They changed Amipro to Wordpro at that time so it didn’t really die.  The Smart Icons are one of the things I love and use.  They put all your most common tasks and actions in a convenient place at the top.  In my opinion Lotus was ahead of the times in ease of use and good clean features.

            Group L

      • #2305503 Reply
        rontpxz81
        AskWoody Lounger

        I’m still going to keep using Office 2010 including Outlook.

        5 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2305505 Reply
          Canadian Tech
          AskWoody_MVP

          Ron, almost all of my clients who were using Outlook, have discontinued it. Those that could find and install Windows Live Mail found it far easier to use and more reliable.

          Outlook uses a database technology that often gets tangled up — just like Outlook Express used to. Windows Live Mail (which is a grandson of Outlook Express), does not use that DB.

          CT

          • #2305554 Reply
            BobT
            AskWoody Lounger

            *shrug. I use Outlook 2010 purely for it’s calendar at home. Reminding me of chores and so on. I find it really easy to look at and the navigation is good.

            Still got Word & Excel 2010 also as I hate the UI in the newer versions, the horrible stencilled, “flat” look.

            I’ll keep em for now unless everything goes nuclear. Maybe look at 0Patch. It free?

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2305614 Reply
              Paul T
              AskWoody MVP

              I don’t think 0patch does Office apps, it’s Windows only.

              cheers, Paul

              • #2305673 Reply
                Seff
                AskWoody Plus

                It covers a whole variety of apps, including Office. It’s patched my Office already, and I only have Office 2010 installed.

                1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2306641 Reply
              Canadian Tech
              AskWoody_MVP

              Windows Live Mail has a calendaring feature too.

              CT

          • #2305619 Reply
            mn–
            AskWoody Lounger

            Outlook uses a database technology that often gets tangled up — just like Outlook Express used to. Windows Live Mail (which is a grandson of Outlook Express), does not use that DB.

            Though Windows Live Mail does use a DB … but only for metadata, so the actual mail content is stored in single files per message in a folder tree.

            Oh well. It had potential but I understand there are unfixed bugs and security issues… so most people who used to use Windows Live Mail have migrated to something else. Thunderbird could at least import the message/folder tree from WLM’s local storage (with the ImportExportTools /NG add-in, IIRC) last time I tried.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2306642 Reply
              Canadian Tech
              AskWoody_MVP

              Of my 120 clients, more than 60 use Windows Live Mail. Almost all of them use the 2011 better version. We all use it everyday with no problems. It is probably the single biggest program I use other than Chrome. It rarely fails. 90% of the problems are caused by bad mail provider service or corrupted emails.

              WLM has an extensive contact database and a nice (but small) calendaring feature

              CT

          • #2306114 Reply
            wdburt1
            AskWoody Plus

            I used Outlook for a few years but what I really wanted was a substitute for Outlook Express.  I found it in OE Classic.  I have been very happy with it.  No muss no fuss.

        • #2305723 Reply
          WSBirdLady
          AskWoody Lounger

          I am another one who is still using Office 2010 including Outlook.  I will continue to do so, even though I am very familiar with the later versions, at work and on my husband’s Windows 10 computer.  I don’t like the current flat look either, especially with spreadsheet gridlines so pale as to be almost invisible!

           

          2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2305508 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I suppose that 0Patch will probably issue 0-day patched for Office/Exchange 2010.

      • #2305650 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I don’t think 0patch does Office apps, it’s Windows only.

        cheers, Paul

        They do.

        https://0patch.com/patches.html

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2305664 Reply
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          Maybe look at 0Patch. It free?

          The 0patch updates to Office are not free, as can be seen on the patches page posted by Alex5723 above.

          cheers, Paul

          • #2305675 Reply
            Seff
            AskWoody Plus

            Correct, in order to get Windows 7 cover you need to subscribe to the Pro version, it cost me about £25 per annum.

        • #2305724 Reply
          Susan Bradley
          Da Boss

          It will be interesting to see how effective they will be.  Given that Microsoft will not be releasing updates nor bulletins, it’s going to be harder to know if they are vulnerable.. well until you are exploited.

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2305727 Reply
        agegagh
        AskWoody Plus

        If I install a licensed copy of Office 2010 SP1 from the DVD on a new pc (say in June of 2021 for example) will I still be able to download all the updates released thru October 2020 via Windows Update?

      • #2305887 Reply
        James Bond 007
        AskWoody Lounger

        As Canadian Tech said, the end of support for older Office (and Windows) versions have basically no relevance to home users. They can, and I believe in most cases will, continue to use them until the hardware dies.

        Free alternatives like OpenOffice and LibreOffice can do most of the things Office does. I personally now use OpenOffice (English and Chinese Traditional) if I need to work with similar documents, and if I really need access to Office, I have several VMware virtual machines setup with Office 2003 and 2010 that I can use, although I have not opened them for a long time and I don’t think I will need to any time soon (although I might just open the Office 2010 virtual machines to patch them up to the last security updates later). I also have older versions of WordPerfect installed in VMware virtual machines when I need to access documents created with WordPerfect in the past. These serve me pretty well.

        I don’t think I will need new versions of Office (or any other paid office software suites), subscription or not, ever again.

        Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst.

      • #2306075 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        No worries for me. Company is still using Office 2003, which is better than Office 2010.  Plus using Windows xp. Will be updating to Windows 7 in 3 years from now and than might have Office 2010 to worry about.
        2003 has drop down menu rather than the horrible ribbon…..

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2306885 Reply
          JC Zorkoff
          AskWoody Plus

          I am in complete agreement. I am still using Office 2003 and it is solid as a rock.

          Back in 2008 when I got a laptop, it had a preview version of Office 2007. I tried it and did not like the new ribbon at all. I just removed that version and went back to Office 2003.

          I am now using 2003 on my Win 10 Pro 1909 desktop without any problems.

           

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2306886 Reply
            Microfix
            AskWoody MVP

            I am now using 2003 on my Win 10 Pro 1909 desktop without any problems.

            hmm..interesting, I’ve got MSFT Office 2003 in my software collection from over the years. I might have to try installing it sometime. Didn’t know it worked on W10, thanks for that.
            Wonder if it would still work on 2004 or 20H2 (2010) though?

            No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2306891 Reply
              JC Zorkoff
              AskWoody Plus

              I am planning to continue using Office 2003 when I am forced to upgrade to Win 2004. I don’t see why it would not work.

               

      • #2306109 Reply
        wdburt1
        AskWoody Plus

        These comments apply only to the typical home user installation…

        In days gone by, a copy of Microsoft Office on a home PC was a necessity. It is how letters got written. The document is now replaced by email. Sometimes emails come with attached documents (prepared by someone else) or a PowerPoint presentation. Not very common, but sometimes people actually know enough and care enough to prepare an Excel spread sheet. No one prepares a PPT, only watches.

        Most do not really need Office, but it can be convenient if it is there, but hardly worth spending $100 or more or $25 per year. An old copy of 2000, 2003, 2007, or 2010 is more than adequate. In 2010, most of my clients got their legal licences for $105 for 3 PCs. Perpetual licences. In today’s world, if you do not have an old copy, you download a free copy of a substitute that is more than adequate to meet the need.

        The “loss” of Microsoft “support,” is a non-event. Could even be a good thing. These versions are very stable and in servicing hundreds of PCs for 18 years now, I have never seen a case where un-patched copies caused a problem. I have seen cases of patches that caused problems.

        Remember, I said home installation, not an enterprise.

        Bottom line, what Microsoft now does to their new or old versions is a non-issue.

        I “upgraded” from Office 2003 to Office 2010 to buy some time on the internet computer a few years ago, but now it’s up, and I don’t think I’m going further.  Office 2010 included a couple of features not found on 2003, like the ability to convert to a PDF, but in general it was not an improvement–the user interface exemplifies “change for the sake of change”–and I have kept 2003 on my offweb computer, where real work is done.

        The risk-reward ratio of abandoning proven software to avoid being hacked will have to be better quantified.  Right now it strikes me as a lot of hyperventilating about vulnerabilities that, for the average user, may not matter that much.  Of those who are vulnerable, how many have been hacked?  Such data are pretty scarce.  Instead we get periodic jeremiads to “upgrade,” on the basis of what might happen.

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by wdburt1.
        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by wdburt1.
        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by wdburt1.
        5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2306146 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        When it comes to the EOL of Office 2010, we all have our exit strategies, and this is mine, as a home office user:

        For example: Not just Office 2010, but also the version of Office 2016 for Macs is running out of support this month and even on the same day. So, to show you how my mind functions when it comes to upgrading anything useful to me: I am running now 2016 for Macs and do not intend to upgrade from it to 2019, because it already works well enough for what I need to do. And the upgrade to the next version being pretty much irreversible for someone like me, I prefer not to risk finding out, later on, that changes introduced in 2019 creates problems for me. Plenty of time to change my mind later on, if, by then, the accumulated evidence grants it,

        Office  2010 for Windows, likewise, also still works fine for me, and it is in my old Win 7 PC, now disconnected for good from the Internet, but still useful even so. For Linux, I have installed LibreOffice on the “Linux” side of the now dual boot old Win 7 PC.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2306233 Reply
        doriel
        AskWoody Lounger

        Our company plans to continue using Office 2010. We have no intention in paying more money to Microsoft whenever he whistles. We was thinking about some ESU if possible, but in the end we decided this way.

        Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

        HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2306366 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        The only thing I really use in Office 2010 is Word (and occasionally Excel). And I used OneNote a few times just for OCR. I don’t use Outlook or the rest of the suite.

        I asked my IT guy and he said just to continue using 2010. I asked about security problems and he said to scan files before opening them. That’s easier said than done. I constantly edit Word documents from different sources. And I have to track changes. I can’t stop to scan each document before opening it.

        Do you think I need to move to Office 365? I have two machines. Is the Personal version only for one computer?

        Sigh… I finally bit the bullet and went to Win 10 in January. I’m a last adopter.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2306369 Reply
          Bob99
          AskWoody Plus

          Sigh… I finally bit the bullet and went to Win 10 in January. I’m a last adopter.

          I just made the jump to Win 10 back at the end of August, barely two months ago! Went with completely new hardware built by a mom and pop shop just north of me. Got two computers, one for me and one for my wife. Both replaced older hardware that had been running Win 7 since 2010.

          So what’s that have to do with Office 2010? Well, I also dumped Office 2010 when I made the jump to Win 10, and will be going with LibreOffice as soon as I get around to installing it. Can’t beat the price (free to everyone for personal use) and it’s as big a suite as Office Professional. Also has great compatibility for Word documents, or so I’m told.

          R/

          Bob99

          • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Bob99. Reason: Typos--I GOTTA learn how to type!! :-)
          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2306790 Reply
            Morty
            AskWoody Plus

            will be going with LibreOffice

            I’ve tried LibreOffice and OpenOffice. They’re not options for me. I need to work with a team on Office and track changes in Word docs.

            • #2306830 Reply
              Bob99
              Guest

              Ok, fair enough! I would suggest looking into 0patch (zero patch). As noted above and below by @Alex5723 , they do support Office 2010 with their micropatches, but I believe there is a small annual fee for their services. By small, I mean in the range of $25-$35 per year. I’m sure their website will have the details.

              From what I’ve read from others who have posted here about them, you not only get access to micropatches for Office 2010, but other software on your computer as well, so look into it thoroughly before taking the plunge. @Alex5723 has included the link to 0patch’s website in his post above, number 2305650.

              The other option I can think of would be to find a copy of Office 2016 that isn’t tied to the Office 365 subscription model and install Word 2016 from that. BUT, that’s going to be a lot more expen$$ive.

              R/

              Bob99

        • #2306396 Reply
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          Scanning is easy if you have the files local, right click on them in Explorer and select “scan with my AV”.

          If you open them direct from email, the file is copied to your temp directory. If your AV scans on demand, these files should be scanned for you as you use them. You can always launch a scan of the temp directory every 10 minutes via Windows Task Scheduler – and backup regularly.

          cheers, Paul

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2306398 Reply
          mn–
          AskWoody Lounger

          Do you think I need to move to Office 365? I have two machines. Is the Personal version only for one computer?

          Well it says it’s for one person, up to 5 devices…

          Oh and 365 Personal also has the “non-commercial use only” restriction, which forbids rather more than just what I’d call commercial in at least the local translation.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2306644 Reply
          Canadian Tech
          AskWoody_MVP

          Every AV product that I know of automatically scans any file before opening it. I am certain that Bit Defender does.

          CT

          2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2308080 Reply
          Morty
          AskWoody Plus

          I’ve decided I’m going to opt for Office 365. But now I wonder if I need to remove Office 2010 before installing 365.

          I don’t plan to use both, but I’m afraid to dump 2010 before I know that 365 is working properly.

          Thanks, Morty

          • #2308081 Reply
            joep517
            AskWoody MVP

            IIRC, you can’t have a .MSI install (2010) and a C2R install (365) on the same machine. Microsoft recommends uninstalling older versions of Office before attempting to install a newer version.

            --Joe

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2306379 Reply
        AlexEiffel
        AskWoody_MVP

        “Sadly, and unlike Windows 7, Microsoft isn’t offering an Extended Security Updates option for Office 2010. And an unpatched Office makes an especially tempting target for malicious attacks. So just as with Win7, it’s past time to move on to a newer Office.”

        Which means that paying for ESU in a business setting running an OEM version of Office 2010 is useless. I would have been in this situation for many stations and that is why I didn’t pay for ESU.

        Only if you want to hop on the 365 model ESU would make sense.

        I chose to buy 2019 perpetual licenses running Windows 10. My favorite choice would be to run Office perpetual licenses supported for 10 years and an LTS version of Windows supported for 10 years but all I have now is a 7 years supported version of Office and many 18 month supported versions of Windows that end up being 6 months run versions of Windows that never reach the level of polish I expect for a professional product and also a strong desire to avoid as much as I can to use any new Microsoft product or service.

      • #2306672 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        “Sadly, and unlike Windows 7, Microsoft isn’t offering an Extended Security Updates option for Office 2010. And an unpatched Office makes an especially tempting target for malicious attacks. So just as with Win7, it’s past time to move on to a newer Office.”

        0Patch does patch Office 2010 and a long list of 3rd party software too.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2306807 Reply
          AlexEiffel
          AskWoody_MVP

          Yes, thanks, but I am not a fan of third party patching. Old paranoid reflexes, I guess.

      • #2306811 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Yes, thanks, but I am not a fan of third party patching. Old paranoid reflexes, I guess.

        0Patch are better than Microsoft in patching 0-day/some security bugs way before Microsoft does, and there is no telemetry with their patching.

        So far there were no complains about the validity, security and quality of their patches.

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Alex5723.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2306865 Reply
        Bill C.
        AskWoody Plus

        I’m still going to keep using Office 2010 including Outlook.

        This will be my path, except for the Outlook part. I still use it, but have largely relegated Outlook 2010 to a secondary mail application due to it not being able to show images in many emails I receive and wants me to open the email in a browser.

        I have largely moved to Thunderbird as the client for all of my email accounts including Gmail, plus TB is my only client on my main PC which is Linux Mint 19.3. Because TB supports Windows and Linux, moving accounts to new installs or between PCs, while preserving all the settings is very easy.

        Outlook wins hands-down for creating emails, especially if formatting an email in Word, but its growing limitations on downloading and showing many images has soured me. Additionally I felt I needed to ensure important emails were captured to be usable in a post-Windows world.

        I was forced onto MS Office when I changed jobs. My old job was a WordPerfect shop, the new was MS. I have used Word for many years, but still struggle occasionally with formatting compatibilities when incorporating material. By struggle, I mean Word never had the robust reveal codes feature of WP. At times I have to resort to the strip ALL formatting and then reformat to make it work.

        For me the GOLD in MS Office was Excel and PowerPoint and their integration. At this stage, I resist all SaaS and mandated Cloud features (like Office365) and its churn of UI changes, gimmicks, and ‘new features’.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2308084 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        Microsoft recommends uninstalling older versions of Office before attempting to install a newer version.

        Aha. Sometimes the new installation removes older versions.

        I guess the drill, then, is to follow the same procedure as a DEFON 4 update: Run a full backup, then create a system restore point.

        Then pray and install.

        Thank you!

      • #2309955 Reply
        Mitja Kolsek
        AskWoody Lounger

        Hello everyone, since 0patch has been mentioned a couple of times here I will assume it’s not inappropriate to confirm that we indeed “security adopted” Office 2010 and will provide critical security patches for it for at least 12 months.

        More information in our blog post: https://blog.0patch.com/2020/11/0patch-keeps-office-2010-secured-after.html

        Thank you all!

        Mitja Kolsek
        0patch co-founder

        5 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2309993 Reply
          L95
          AskWoody Plus

          In view of the fact that Microsoft has discontinued security updates for Office 2010, I’m trying to decide whether I should use 0Patch for my security for Office 2010,  or upgrade to a more recent version of Office,  such as Office 2013 or Office 2016  (the latest version, Office 2019 wouldn’t work for me it’s not compatible with my Windows 7 Computer).  I contacted Woody Leonhard about this, because in the past he had seemed to indicate some hesitancy about using 0Patch for Windows updates about a year ago (in a posting of September 20, 2019),  in which he said  “In all cases, I’ve refrained from recommending them, simply because I’m concerned about applying third party patches directly to Windows binaries. That said, to date, they’ve had a very good track record. Whether they can continue that record with patches-on-patches-on-patches remains to be seen, of course.

          Woody’s response is that he recommends I post this on his website,  so that’s what I’m doing here.  What do people think about whether I should use 0Patch or switch to Office 2013 or 2016?  I have a Windows 7 computer with Extended Security Updates from Microsoft,  but those security updates don’t cover MS Office.  I realize that 0Patch would probably be less expensive than upgrading to Office 2013 or Office 2016,  but I’m not interested in the cost.  I’m just interested in (1) the adequacy of security coverage,  and (2) how much of my time would be involved in learning to work with new software and dealing with troubleshooting issues.   So if people could give me some advice as to whether I should upgrade to a later version of Office or use 0Patch instead,  I would appreciate it.

      • #2310027 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        how much of my time would be involved in learning to work with new software and dealing with troubleshooting issues

        If you are referring to 0Patch there is nothing to learn as it run in the background and auto-update (just like an A/V software, browser…).

        I never used Microsoft’s Office (I use the free portable LibreOffice) so can’t remark on upgrade.

        My brother uses Windows 7 and I registered his PC to 0Patch Pro which keeps his OS and many 3rd party apps, patched and safe.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        L95
      • #2310091 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        So if people could give me some advice as to whether I should upgrade to a later version of Office or use 0Patch instead,  I would appreciate it.

        If money is not an issue I would update to Windows 10 and a new version of Office.
        You will spend time getting used to Windows / Office, with Office taking the longest as you get used to the new layout / settings.

        If you really don’t want to learn the new stuff, buy 0patch, but you will probably have to update sometime in the next few years as you update the hardware.

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        L95
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