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  • Keizer: Windows 7 usage isn’t going anywhere

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Keizer: Windows 7 usage isn’t going anywhere

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      • #2214060 Reply
        woody
        Da Boss

        Gregg Keizer, in Computerworld: The coronavirus pandemic and its countless disruptions, from business closures to workers fleeing to home offices, app
        [See the full post at: Keizer: Windows 7 usage isn’t going anywhere]

        Total of 21 users thanked author for this post. Here are last 20 listed.
      • #2214067 Reply
        Geo
        AskWoody Lounger

        Not to mention W7 daily 0patch Pro micro-patches are doing what Microsoft should have been  doing all along.

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Geo.
        11 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2223329 Reply
          HiFlyer
          AskWoody Plus

          Opatch?

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2223333 Reply
            PKCano
            Da Boss

            0patch is a third-party provider of security patches for Win7 EOL (instead of buying the ESU updates from Microsoft).

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2223888 Reply
              AmbularD
              AskWoody Plus

              Or in addition to.  I’m up to current on the ESU updates, and 0patch is still micro-patching a number of other items Microsoft and other vendors haven’t fixed.

              i7-4790k - Z97X-Gaming 3 - DDR3 2133 x 32GB - GTX 1070 FTW - Windows 7 Pro x64 SP1 ESU

              1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2214074 Reply
        lurks about
        AskWoody Lounger

        Any large scale migration will be hold as they often require some physical ‘hand-holding’ to fix issues, install overlooked software, orient users, etc of at least some.

      • #2214075 Reply
        Zathras
        AskWoody Plus

        I agree with making the updates available to everyone…  as long as Microsoft gives ESU customers 1 year from the date Microsoft cuts off the non ESU people again.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2214077 Reply
        GreatAndPowerfulTech
        AskWoody Plus

        I had one customer this week that wanted to work from home on a well functioning Windows 7 laptop. She was concerned about Windows 10’s frequent bugs. So, she didn’t want it updated to W10 at this time. I set the laptop to have 0patch’s micropatches do their thing. I’ve been using 0patch for a few months now. It appears to work well. Sometimes, 0patch puts out security patches before Microsoft does. I agree that Microsoft releasing critical security patches for Windows 7 would be a great PR move and good for Windows users. I doubt they’ll do it though.

        It’s a crazy world, these days.

        GreatAndPowerfulTech

        10 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2214085 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        As well as the ESU and 0Patch, could the ESU workaround also be responsible for the increase in usage? curfews, computers and curiosity ;)/

      • #2214090 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        “I think Microsoft has everything to gain, and absolutely nothing to lose, by making the Win7 Extended Security Updates available to everyone.”

        For FREE.

        7 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2214106 Reply
        Demeter
        AskWoody Plus

        Still remaining a Win 7 warrior. Seeking advice for which version of 0 Patch is best for a home user; the free version or the purchased version with added on features?

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2214128 Reply
          jburk07
          AskWoody Plus

          Still remaining a Win 7 warrior. Seeking advice for which version of 0 Patch is best for a home user; the free version or the purchased version with added on features?

          The 0patch FAQ makes it clear that you need the paid version (Pro) in order to be reasonably protected. As they state, “Our Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 security micropatches are only available with a 0patch PRO license.”

          That being said, the Pro version is very reasonable (around US $26 for a year with the current exchange rate). I’ve been using 0Patch Pro for a few weeks and have been very happy with it.

          Linux Mint Cinnamon 19.2
          Group A:
          Win7 Pro x64 SP1 Haswell, 0patch Pro, dual boot with Linux
          Win7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Ivy Bridge, 0patch Pro, mostly offline
          Win7 Ultimate x64 SP1 Arrandale, offline
          Win 10 Pro x64 v1909 Ivy Bridge

          5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2214124 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Still remaining a Win 7 warrior. Seeking advice for which version of 0 Patch is best for a home user; the free version or the purchased version with added on features?

        The Pro version.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2214136 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Group B people should be aware that to get either MS or 0patch fixes they first need to install the December S&Q rollup, to make all Win 7 PCs “look the same” for those patching services to be able to install patches. Otherwise, different patching strategies complicates the situation for them. That is one reason why I have not subscribed to any Win 7 EOL patching service. To some my motive might not seem that important: so, please, go ahead and install that rollup, if you have not done so already, and carry on. What others choose to do is definitely none of my business and, most likely, subscribing to 0patch is a good idea. Just one I don’t like to adopt myself. I do have several backups and another computer with the OS still being supported, so if my Win 7 PC gets hit by a really bad bug and goes belly up, I’ll be sorry, but shall remain able to carry on.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2214178 Reply
          Demeter
          AskWoody Plus

          Patched up through the last patches that rolled out in Jan. ’20 so should be good to go with 0Patch. Thanks for all of the advice. Win 7 Pro, x 64, SP1, i7-Core “Haswell”, was a Grp. A patcher

          2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2214182 Reply
          Cybertooth
          AskWoody Plus

          That’s an interesting question. My understanding is that the final (January 2020) rollup is needed for 0patch micropatching to work, but I have installed only the Group B patches and yet 0patch seems to be working fine:

          0patch-applied

          I’d be curious to see screenshots from 0patch customers who did apply the January rollup, in order to compare the numbers of micropatches applied to our respective computers. Maybe some of 0patch’s micropatches don’t get applied if one has installed “only” the January SO update.

          (I may decide eventually to install that final rollup and then rely on the methods, published here, to prevent MS telemetry.)

           

          Attachments:
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          • #2214203 Reply
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Cybertooth ( #2214182 ) Do you have the paid 0patch or the free version installed?

            As to which rollup: I was not sure of for which month had to be installed. I seemed to remember that, around September, the word was to install October’s, then December’s, but I did not followed this issue any further, as I was not interested, after nearly two years of avoiding them, to go and install a rollup right at the very end.

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

          • #2219192 Reply
            jburk07
            AskWoody Plus

            I’d be curious to see screenshots from 0patch customers who did apply the January rollup, in order to compare the numbers of micropatches applied to our respective computers. Maybe some of 0patch’s micropatches don’t get applied if one has installed “only” the January SO update.

            @cybertooth, I installed the January rollup, and my Applied Patches screen looks very similar to yours.

            Applied-Patches-screen-shot-040320-1

            Linux Mint Cinnamon 19.2
            Group A:
            Win7 Pro x64 SP1 Haswell, 0patch Pro, dual boot with Linux
            Win7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Ivy Bridge, 0patch Pro, mostly offline
            Win7 Ultimate x64 SP1 Arrandale, offline
            Win 10 Pro x64 v1909 Ivy Bridge

            Attachments:
            4 users thanked author for this post.
            • #2219681 Reply
              Cybertooth
              AskWoody Plus

              Thanks a bunch for the screenshot, @jburk07. It looks like maybe installing the rollup vs. the Security Only patch does make a difference for 0patch purposes: I have 11 micropatches installed and you have 14. One of yours is for Foxit Reader, which I don’t have on this PC, but then you also have two micropatches for jscript.dll (patches 412 and 414) that I don’t have even though my computer also has jscript.dll on it.

              No doubt the differences will keep mounting over time unless I do that final rollup.

               

              2 users thanked author for this post.
              • #2223270 Reply
                jburk07
                AskWoody Plus

                I have 11 micropatches installed and you have 14. One of yours is for Foxit Reader, which I don’t have on this PC, but then you also have two micropatches for jscript.dll (patches 412 and 414) that I don’t have even though my computer also has jscript.dll on it.

                @cybertooth,
                That Foxit Reader patch was applied when I ran one of 0patch’s suggested “tests” when I was in the trial period. Per their instructions I downloaded the Foxit Reader file for that test. I *hope* I uninstalled it all later – the folder in Program Files (x86) no longer exists, though there might be some unseen remnants somewhere – and I’m thinking that particular applied patch is just listed “historically” in the Applied Patches, but I don’t really know.

                For the jscript.dll patch, I thought maybe one of your other security procedures had sidestepped that vulnerability. It would be interesting to find out whether the rollup really makes that difference.

                Linux Mint Cinnamon 19.2
                Group A:
                Win7 Pro x64 SP1 Haswell, 0patch Pro, dual boot with Linux
                Win7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Ivy Bridge, 0patch Pro, mostly offline
                Win7 Ultimate x64 SP1 Arrandale, offline
                Win 10 Pro x64 v1909 Ivy Bridge

                1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #2223765 Reply
                rc primak
                AskWoody_MVP

                Foxit Reader is a third party application. Not part of the Windows 7 core OS.

                Third Party updates are best managed through a separate update manager. I agree with Fred Langa (AskWoody Newsletter) that SUMo when used in an advisory role, is an excellent way to catch those non-OS patches and updates.

                I believe it is not the role of a Windows Patching application to make recommendations for patching third-party software, and vice-versa. Fred further breaks patching down into four types. (The article is in the Paid Version of the AskWoody Newsletter, so I’ll leave it to the discretion of the Admins here whether to post a Link.)

                -- rc primak

                1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #2223807 Reply
                Cybertooth
                AskWoody Plus

                Although 0patch is best known for its Windows micropatches, it isn’t the only software for which 0patch issues micropatches. For explanation and reasoning, see here and especially here.

                 

                • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Cybertooth.
                1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2214169 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        In other news according to

        https://www.netmarketshare.com/

        Both Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 Increased their Market Share.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2214211 Reply
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          I have some difficulty seeing the share of “other” (research labs, universities, movie making studios, search engines, graphic arts, science and engineering) amounting altogether to less than 30% percentage of all users. And the same being true also of the very small 0.74 % assigned to users of  Linux (less than the percentage of Mac users), as many of those organizations mentioned above use Linux as their preferred operating system, particularly in Europe. Also the counts are based, if I understood this correctly, on the use of Web browsers. That is a big part of the use by the general public and many businesses, but not so much by those other users, and uses, of non-embedded general computers.

          Additional estimates about the website population:

          • 76% participate in pay per click programs to drive traffic to their sites.
          • 43% are commerce sites
          • 18% are corporate sites
          • 10% are content sites
          • 29% classify themselves as other (includes gov, org, search engine marketers etc.)”

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

          • #2223195 Reply
            Ascaris
            AskWoody_MVP

            Are you referring to the netmarketshare.com numbers, Oscar?  The Linux share is about double what you suggest, if so, at ~1.54% (it lists Ubuntu separately, as if it is not Linux).  MacOS has always had higher market share than Linux in these reports.

            The netmarketshare.com numbers are presumably based on user agent strings of browsers that visit whichever sites that run their analytics scripts.  The computers that run Linux for various tasks, but that are not used for browsing the web, are not reported.  If you were to run a survey of the OS run on the 500 fastest supercomputers in the world, the Linux share would be 100%, but that was not the sample they used.

            Most likely, the desktop users (of any OS) who use script (and maybe ad) blockers in their browsers would also not show up in the stats, as the scripts that do the data collection would never run in the first place.  Since Linux has thus far been used as a desktop OS mainly by techie types, I would guess that they are also more likely to run script blockers while browsing.  The Linux share on desktops might be a little higher, but it’s not going to be higher than MacOS.

            I don’t mind that Linux has appeared on so few desktops.  Even with its small numbers, it’s better than anything released by Microsoft for better than half a decade, and it keeps getting better.  Linux has 100% market share of my PCs, and my PCs are the ones I am most concerned about, of all those PCs in the world.

            It would be nice if Linux was a big enough player to get some of the software companies to decide to release Linux versions of their products, which would reduce the reliance people have on Microsoft, but that’s not a problem for me personally.  I don’t run anything that needs Windows and that won’t run in WINE (unless it’s a relatively simple thing that I only need on occasion, like the software to program my mouse, in which case I may use it in a Windows 7 VM).

            I’d prefer it if more stuff did work in Linux, but I’m never going to use Windows in the form it’s in now, so it’s not a choice between using any given product on Linux or Windows, but of Linux with or without the given program in question.  If it won’t work on Linux, I don’t need it.

            In a more general sense, it would be nice if Linux would increase in market share enough to catch the attention of people who would like to leave Windows behind but who think Linux is just for techies or that it’s too [this] or too [that].  It would be nice for there to be a general consensus among PC users that there is a viable alternative to Windows (even if they still choose to use Windows), as that would force Microsoft to behave like they need to earn people’s OS business rather than simply being entitled to it because they’re Microsoft.  If they’re still interested in the PC OS market, that is, which is something about which I remain unconvinced.

            Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.18.5).

            • #2223392 Reply
              OscarCP
              AskWoody Plus

              Ascaris  ( #2223195 ):

              Are you referring to the netmarketshare.com numbers, Oscar? The Linux share is about double what you suggest, if so, at ~1.54% (it lists Ubuntu separately, as if it is not Linux). MacOS has always had higher market share than Linux in these reports.”

              Yes, to the question, and I was not suggesting anything, merely quoting the netmarketshare article and expressing my skepticism that it is a valid assessment of how many computers (and, quite roughly, also users) are there using Linux as the OS, as a percentage of all those counted in the way explained in the same article. So, as I hoped to have made clear in my comment, I strongly suspect that percentage to be a serious undercount of computers running Linux, for the reasons I have given there.

              So it seems to me that we are both in good agreement in our assumptions, in our reasoning and in our conclusions.

              Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • #2214210 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        I’ve still got Windows 7/7 Pro installed on 4 out of 5 of my laptops but they are never allowed online  with 7 anymore as 4 out 5 are  laptops are dual booting 7/Linux. So 7’s still at EOL and used offline and Linux when booted for online usage.

        It’s past peak Windows 7 and Windows 10 is all the remains for new PC/Laptops going forward. I do not really need any 7 ESU but I can see where for some 7 folks, that are dependent on Windows 7 only based software, that they may really need that ESU extended support offered with all that is happening currently.

        I’m moving away from any dependency on only Redmond’s OS/Application ecosystem and even the 5th(Windows10) laptop is getting a Linux alternative dual boot OS option.

        Those usage numbers are no surprise to me for 7 what with that Enterprise/ESU option and 0Patch for non enterprise consumer Windows 7 end users.  MS maybe should have offered that ESU to all users of 7 and made more in ESU licensing revenues. But as for me that’s water under the bridge as I’m experiencing better things when booted into Linux, performance wise, on 4 laptops under Linux than when the 4 laptops are booted into 7/7Pro partitions.

        Windows 7 is the new XP, and then some, if folks are looking for similar longer term OS stability like the 10/Enterprise/LTSC folks are offered. I’m happy with my Linux/7 dual use option and 7 around even long after 2023 when the ESU program ends for 7 and even 8.1 goes EOL. Windows 7 is still the best productivity OS that MS ever offered and all of 7’s consumer/enterprise end users getting better OS stability rather than 10’s rolling instability.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2214241 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          “Windows 7 is the new XP, and then some,” Nope. Windows Xp is the new OS. Many business still use it. Plus many are removing Windows 10 and install Windows 7 since the VPN bugs has made the Windows 10 useless.

           

          • #2223207 Reply
            Paul T
            AskWoody MVP

            many are removing Windows 10 and install Windows 7 since the VPN bugs

            You have figures to back this up, please?

            cheers, Paul

            2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2223228 Reply
        abbodi86
        AskWoody_MVP

        I guess it will take a year at least to shake Windows 7 usage share

      • #2223287 Reply
        Canadian Tech
        AskWoody_MVP

        I look after about 120 Win7 client machines. The current crisis has caused a surge in my support work as my clients are using their systems far more.

        I read a few months ago that something like 75% of medical scene computers using Win7 will not be replaced by Win10 systems. Medical use computers tend to be integrated with other systems. The cost of a switch over like that is many times the cost of the PC itself. AND, those systems are mostly behind walls that protect them. Win7 is actually a much better system for most of those settings.

        I am not the least bit interested in Windows Update. Not a one of my client systems has had a WU in 34 months now and they run far better than any systems I have ever seen. Not a single instance of any kind of problem in 34 months on 120 systems.

        CT

        10 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2223317 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          If anyone is running Windows 7 consumer client in a medical environment and not Windows 7 Enterprise then those folks may be in a HIPPA of trouble as medical needs 7/Enterprise for the proper medical privacy settings to be in place and available via the Enterprise OS’s UI.

          And that Enterprise 7 better be getting ESU as well or that’s just waiting for a lawsuit for the clients and their IT provider. Consumer versions of Windows should never be used in any medical setting what with all that can go wrong there because of MS’s consumer version monetization antics.

          But 7 will always have less issues simply because of that OS’s fixed code base relative to 10’s massively rolling code base refactoring madness that sees 10 remain in a continuous unstable BETA release state. Windows 7 was pretty much code complete after service pack 1 and remained stable more because MS kept its hands off the feature creep button for the most part with 7.

          Even the folks that got 10 for “Free” are paying the price in lost time and productivity as things get broken so often with each new update with feature updates breaking drivers and all manner of things that would never happen under Windows 7 in relative comparison.

          It’s only the 10 enterprise/LTSC folks that get more stability for longer periods of time and that’s on the backs of the 10 consumer end users that are the BETA testers for MS’s cash cow enterprise/volume/quality assurance licensees.

          Windows 7 ESU users like the medical folks have more costs/recurring costs sunk into their mission critical medical software that’s more custom/bespoke and any 7/ESU licensing costs pale in comparison to the costs of that mission critical medical software.

          That’s why XP got extended paid updates and that’s why 7 is the new XP in regards to any entity that has so much invested in their custom/bespoke mission critical software that’s only been vetted/certified for 7 currently like it was for XP in the past. Mission Critical Software has to be vetted/certified($$$$$) to work on any OS/OS version at as close to 100% up-time as possible or the entity(Enterprise, Government, other) can not function. 7 is the new XP in that regard and that’s just because the mission critical software costs so much to get vetted/certified that that needs to last at least 10 years in order to be properly amortized.

          The folks staying on 7 currently are more than likely the same folks that took their time moving from XP to 7 back when 7 arrived. And that’s not because of 7 that’s because of the mission critical software that’s most expensive and has vetting/certification costs that have to be amortized over a longer period of time and that time period may not exactly mesh with MS’s new OS release/update cadence.

          3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2223344 Reply
        scooby
        AskWoody Plus

        I have a 9 year old Windows 7 machine that I still use for a particular program that I like better in its Windows 7 version than its Windows 10 version.

        As far as I can tell 0Patch has been working fine for me, and I’m very satisfied with the under $30/yr. price. Solves a problem for me. I also continue to install whatever updates Microsoft puts outfor Windows 7.

        BTW if Microsoft “no longer supports” Windows 7, why do they still offer the malicious software removal tool every month? I thought that would stop after January, but I’ve gotten and installed them for Feb. and March also.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2223372 Reply
          alpha128
          AskWoody Plus

          BTW if Microsoft “no longer supports” Windows 7, why do they still offer the malicious software removal tool every month? I thought that would stop after January, but I’ve gotten and installed them for Feb. and March also. – scooby

          I can think of three possible reasons, either individually, or in combination:

          1. The amount of coding work to create Win 7 MRT updates every month is minimal, i.e., largely shared with the Win 10 MRT.
          2. Microsoft recognizes there are a large number of Win 7 machines in use, and feels some responsibility for the Windows ecosystem as a whole.
          3. Microsoft wants to track the number of live Win 7 installations through Windows Update.
          3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2223484 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Have a look here for some numbers that contradict this post

        https://gs.statcounter.com/windows-version-market-share/desktop/worldwide/

        • #2223546 Reply
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          This article is about desktops, the article discussed in this thread is about all PCs, so it includes laptops as well.

          It is my impression that laptops have more users, these days, than desktops. Am I wrong?

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2223548 Reply
            anonymous
            Guest

            @oscar wrote@: ‘It is my impression that laptops have more users, these days, than desktops. Am I wrong?’

            That’s for M$ to answer, using their gathered telemetry statistics, CPU type etc.

            • #2223553 Reply
              Canadian Tech
              AskWoody_MVP

              One factor to keep in mind: Desktop computer life expectancy is about double that of laptops.

              CT

              3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2223578 Reply
            b
            AskWoody Plus

            This article is about desktops, the article discussed in this thread is about all PCs, so it includes laptops as well.

            So does that statcounter article:

            Are laptops included in the desktop platform?
            Yes. Laptops and desktop machines are included in the desktop platform together. We use the browser useragent to determine the platform and there is not enough information contained in the useragent to distinguish between laptops and desktops. That is why we do not have a separate laptop platform.
            https://gs.statcounter.com/faq#desktop-laptop

            Windows 10 Pro Version 2004: Group ASAP (chump/pioneer)

            3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2223527 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I can think of three possible reasons

        4. Microsoft doesn’t want Win 7 PCs to spread viruses so it also updates Win 7 defender/Microsoft Security Essentials.

        Microsoft Security Essentials reached end of service on January 14, 2020 and is no longer available as a download. Microsoft will continue to release signature updates (including engine) to service systems currently running Microsoft Security Essentials untill 2023.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2223651 Reply
          abbodi86
          AskWoody_MVP

          MSRT is useless tool anyway 🙂

          i believe they don’t want to change or break MSRT and MSE mechanism just to differentiate ESU-systems from non-ESU

          MSE is still downloadable
          https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=5201

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2223676 Reply
            Pierre77
            AskWoody Plus

            Just a clarification re MSE. It was never part of Windows 7 but released  by M$ as a separate piece of software.

            Just my 2 cents worth.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2223830 Reply
              anonymous
              Guest

              And MSE can no longer be downloaded and installed/activated on 7 EOL and only those 7/EOL customers that had MSE installed prior to 7’s EOL will be able to get the MSE virus definition updates. I’ve only got 1 out of 4 Win 7 laptops with MSE installed that can still get virus definition updates and the other laptops had MSE uninstalled and I did not reinstall MSE before 7 when EOL for consumers.

               

              • #2223833 Reply
                PKCano
                Da Boss

                Please see @abbodi86 ‘s download link in #2223651 above. You can still download/install for Win7. There are no more engine updates, but it still provides updated definitions.

                2 users thanked author for this post.
              • #2223880 Reply
                anonymous
                Guest

                PKCano, I had read Alex5723 (in this thread) and was surprised to see a quotation that included updating the engine in MSE. This caused me to review my own MpSigStub.log where I found that on 20-MAR-2020 the engine updated from 1.1.16800.2 to 1.1.16900.4

                I do not know if or when the next MSE engine update may occur, but do see at least one instance where it has happened since Win7 EOL. I do also continue to receive regular signature updates as well, just as you say.

              • #2223882 Reply
                PKCano
                Da Boss

                I believe MS said it would not be updating the engine. But with MS, who knows. 🙂
                Did you verify the date on the executable to be after Win7 EOL?

              • #2223894 Reply
                anonymous
                Guest

                This was received through the automated update process. So no, I did no verification ahead of time. Copied from the MpSigStub.log (could provide more of the alphanumerics if it is helpful)

                ================================ ValidateUpdate ================================
                
                MpSigStub successfully updated Microsoft Antimalware (Beijing) using the Engine only package.
                
                         Original:    Updated to:
                 Engine: 1.1.16800.2  1.1.16900.4
                
                DeltaUpdateFailure set to 0
                BddUpdateFailure set to 0
                End time: 2020-03-20 19:40:40Z
                --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                

                The format of the lengthy log entry matches prior entries, I have no reason to doubt authenticity. This entry was then followed by that days signature package as a separate process.

                1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2223878 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Upon some reflection, I have these thoughts to offer:

        The Win 7 % vs. Win 10 % is not the most important consideration to those of us who are Win 7 holdouts. What really matters to us, or to me at least, is that the Win 7 % stays sufficiently high for developers of Win 7 patches or equivalent (such as 0patch) and the developers of applications for Windows to find the necessary incentive to keep their products for Win 7  current enough, particularly those applications and firmware we most need to use, as well as providing patches as needed to protect their users from emerging malware threats and, or their software security holes that allow a potential exposure to them; also fixing their own bugs and incorporating recent advances in their kinds of software. And, generally, remaining compatible, while keeping up to date, with Win 7.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

        2 users thanked author for this post.
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    Reply To: Keizer: Windows 7 usage isn’t going anywhere

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