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  • Kudos to NWS for their new radar site

    Home Forums Outside the box The Junk Drawer Kudos to NWS for their new radar site

    • This topic has 48 replies, 10 voices, and was last updated 1 week, 4 days ago by anonymous.
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      • #2318428
        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        For a really long time, the NWS (US National Weather Service) weather radar data available on the official site has been antiquated and much inferior to that offered by third-party sources, like Weather Underground, The Weather Channel, and Intellicast (though that one is no more), which are all now part of the same company, at least as far as the web sites go. The problem I had with all of those sites (Intellicast had the best of the lot for this) was that my slow Swift laptop had trouble with those relatively heavyweight pages. It would work, but scrolling or zooming was very laggy and choppy, and I often overshot the target and zoomed or scrolled more than intended.

        I got a note from the local NWS office (spotter network) to go have a look at the new site that’s going to be rolled out officially in about a week, so I did… and it’s fantastic. Unlike Weather Underground’s Wundermap, there’s no annoying ad taking up vertical space (on a 16:9 display that’s already on the short side vertically), and it’s much easier on the underpowered CPU in the Swift. It allows using the WSR-88D (Weather Service Radar, 1988, Doppler) or TDWR (Terminal Doppler Weather Radar), in higher resolution than I’ve seen from a free site before, and with the full complement of radar products available, including storm relative Doppler and dual-pol. And on top of that, it’s deliberately designed so that the URL changes with each modification the user makes to the map, so that one need only bookmark it to return to that same view anytime. The others have the ability to store the view data in a cookie, but my cookies are deleted repeatedly throughout the day, and I don’t like making exceptions, particularly when the site in question also carries ads, as all of them other than NWS do.

        Go have a look, if you haven’t already (and you care about such things)! The preview (available from now until the official rollout) is at https://preview-radar.weather.gov/. After that, the “preview-” part of the URL will be removed.

         

        Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.21.1 User Edition)

        13 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2318495
        rexr
        AskWoody Plus

        Good tip and good on NWS. I have the ‘preview’ site up now and the rain is rolling in from the Pacific. Bookmarked.

        Win10 Pro 20H2 19042.746
        Backups with Macrium Reflect home edition
      • #2318848
        anonymous
        Guest

        This is very good and it appears to be light enough to use on a mobile phone! The other sites are too complicated unless the right map has been bookmarked for later use.

      • #2318871
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Ascaris: “The problem I had with all of those sites (Intellicast had the best of the lot for this) was that my slow Swift laptop had trouble with those relatively heavyweight pages. It would work, but scrolling or zooming was very laggy and choppy, and I often overshot the target and zoomed or scrolled more than intended.

        In the USA, I have been using the Weather Underground Website for several years and had the same problem with slow page loading until I started using an ad blocker. Since then, I can access this weather service without problems.

        When one sets it up to get reports from a participating weather station near where one lives (those stations are largely operated by small businesses and weather enthusiasts) updated every few minutes, one can also look at the radar images from: the nearest operational radar, the whole local area (several states) from all operational radars there, and the whole USA from all the stations across the country. As well as weather in other countries, such as: Canada, parts of the UK and, to a limited extent, Australia.

        All the three levels of weather mapping can be animated to see how the weather has been changing and storms are moving, for example and more interestingly, in the direction of one’s place, and how fast. Also the kind of precipitation: rain, snow, freezing rain or mixed. There are forecasts of several important local weather variables (e.g. temperature, humidity, pressure, precipitation, wind speed) by the hour as well as for several days ahead. There are also videos produced by the parent company, the Weather Channel, on developing weather, announcements of area warnings and alerts issued by the NWS, astronomical information (e.g., hours of sunrise and sunset), etc.

        One can also see, worldwide, the active tropical storms projected paths and times of arrival at various locations that, as I live near the US Atlantic coast and in a place the maps invariably and consistently show for many days before the event as being right in the path of all incoming hurricanes (which luckily rarely show up and mostly in a very weakened form), I watch religiously every single day during the stormy season.

        https://www.wunderground.com/

        I also follow the reports in “Eye of the Storm”, where Hansen, Masters and all the people who used to comment at their former Weather Underground place, as well as send local reports and data, have moved after they were told by the Weather Channel to leave.

        https://yaleclimateconnections.org/section/eye-on-the-storm/

        I also follow the local area reports from the Washington Post at the “Capital Weather Gang.” For me, it’s good to see their animated radar map that shows lightening activity and areas where warnings or watches have been issued for, among other things, tornadoes.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2319369
        Nathan Parker
        AskWoody_MVP

        I’ve also had good luck with WeatherBug.com (Disclaimer, I work for the weather data provider who powers the data to WeatherBug.com) and the maps at BaronWeather.com. The WeatherBug and Baron Critical Weather apps are extremely useful on mobile devices.

        For businesses, I recommend Baron’s solutions or Earth Networks (I work for Earth Networks).

        Nathan Parker

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2323831
          GoneToPlaid
          AskWoody Plus

          Thanks for sharing the WeatherBug.com link. I like the layout and and the graphics.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2323887
            Nathan Parker
            AskWoody_MVP

            The WeatherBug and Baron Weather sites offer the most dependable radar feed for a third-party site since both sites use radar data from Baron’s feed. You’re getting the same benefit that many TV stations and enterprises rely on.

            The WeatherBug site also offers the most dependable lightning feed as well since it’s based on the Earth Networks Total Lightning network that can detect both in-cloud and cloud-to-ground lightning.

            Nathan Parker

      • #2319418
        MHCLV941
        AskWoody Plus

        Very cool site – a lesson in how a dedicated web site ought to work.  That you can also get the 7-day forecast and any weather alerts pertinent to your focus location is a great addition.  If I were a TV weather person, I’d be thinking about my next career!

        The only thing that’s missing – and maybe not important – is a history loop, i.e., what’s happened over the past several hours.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2319624
        anonymous
        Guest

        Radarscope. Mobile (free and paid) and desktop (paid, $13/yr). The fastest radar available. Every radar product one could need. I’ve been using NOAA Weather Radar since the old analog days both professionally (former longtime Emergency Manager) and personal. Radarscope has the FASTEST update times available. When there’s severe weather that is important.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2319826
        anonymous
        Guest

        Surely you jest.  The new site is simply horrible, slow to load, updates the entire US even when you’re looking at a area subset of the data, and updates *every time* you zoom.  It’s not as granular, nor detailed, as the old radar site.  The “animation” loads huge blocks consisting of the entire US that take a good 60 seconds to fully load on a very fast connection.  Zooming is sketchy at best as you often overshoot your target with it practically impossible to slowly zoom in.  If you zoom during an animation it has to reload the entire thing again (remember – the entire US and taking a good 60 seconds).  You could also zoom much closer in with the old site.  I dread how badly this will perform during a weather event.  At least with the old site I could still see the US – now the whole thing will likely crash.  It just looks “pretty” to compete with all the junkware sites mentioned.  Give me their old radar sites any day.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2319908
          SkipH
          AskWoody Plus

          I’ll add to the “anonymous” post # 2319826:

          Only has ‘play’. Only a ‘pause’, therefore very hard to stop it on a certain time frame. If you miss the time you wanted to stop on, have to finish playing the whole series of animations and start over again.

          Can’t ‘rewind’ the animations to a previous point in time. Can’t set a user-selected chunk of time intervals, and therefore can’t reply a shorter (user selected) time interval of animations.

        • #2324286
          anonymous
          Guest

          The new site is terrible for usability.  I have used the old version for years, particularly the loop to see how cells and storm fronts are moving.  This new version is virtually useless because the loop images are loading so slow, then seem to reload on every revolution,  this is true even when using aa single radar site.

        • #2332287
          anonymous
          Guest

          UUGGH-I am the biggest weather freak I know and the new NOAA radar, and the satellites are terrible-the satellite is at an angle that is not usable, and the radar is absolutely frustrating, incorrect, and shows inaccurate information on precipitation accumulation, cloud presence, etc.

          I wish I could have kept the old system, I am now trying to find an alternative to NOAA

        • #2337879
          anonymous
          Guest

          Confirming the above:  As of 2021-01-26, composite radar is still miserably slow and clumsy:  a high-bandwidth product running on low-speed servers, apparently.  See the NWS Anchorage page (www.weather.gov/afc/radarpage) to see their mea culpa and explanation.

          Other comments here indicate different experiences, which – since the NWS itself acknowledges a problem – suggests that those experiencing fast load times are perhaps looking at a “lite” or preview product and not the primary imaging product.

          It would not be astonishing to me if it were the case that commercial intermediaries (private weather services) have a separate pipeline for getting NWS weather data, and that the product being made available to the public is inferior – by design or merely by convenient neglect – in a way that economically advantages those intermediaries.

           

          • #2340469
            anonymous
            Guest

            I used to be able to see the gust fronts and some lower resolution storm rotational motion on the old Adobe presentation but now the NWS radar display has taken all of that away.  It’s nothing but coarse pixelation on the order of one mile per pixel and the whole thing looking like a child’s water color painting.  No longer is there any detail .

            I used the old display for worker life safety when having crews out during stormy conditions.  Now that is all gone and repeated comments to the NWS only result in “thank you for your input”.

            The problem behind the slow load and jerky motion is because the designers load individual pages of map for each step in the loop.  Then your machine has to load each page repeatedly when it displays the moving radar presentation.  For some machines this really taxes the processor to do so.

            I did read one comment from one of the higher up officials in the NWS commenting that while he appreciates the knowledge of the meteorologists and staff involved in the design of the new display he doesn’t think that they possess the experience to design an efficiently functional website of this nature and that it should have been left to an organization capable of doing so.

             

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2319848
        MHCLV941
        AskWoody Plus

        Surely you jest.

        No, and your experience is just the opposite of mine.

        The only thing we more or less agree on is that the zoom is touchy, but no more so than Google maps.  I would also point out that “preview” is the URL for a reason.

        • #2319909
          SkipH
          AskWoody Plus

          I would also point out that “preview” is the URL for a reason.

          From the (soon to be shut down) Portland, Oregon Radar site (my nearest NWS Forecast Office):

          “On or about December 16, 2020, the web pages here at radar.weather.gov will be replaced. Click here to preview the new site now”

          URL goes to the “preview” site.

          • #2319989
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            I wonder which weather site you, who have been posting after Nathan’s one, are discussing. It always helps others to appreciate one’s comments to begin them by explaining what they are all about.

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        • #2320006
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          No, and your experience is just the opposite of mine.

          And mine.

          It starts out with a view of the CONUS, and I zoom to where I want it to be. Even on my poky laptop, it is responsive and fast. It loads the tiles I need in a second or two, and it’s good to go. What it’s loading or rendering outside of the viewport doesn’t bother me one way or the other as long as it doesn’t bog it down, and it doesn’t on my Swift (and certainly not on my computers that are actually swift, but are not called Swift).

          I don’t find the zoom to be overly touchy at all. It’s about how I would adjust it if it had a control for that. All the information is available, including dual pol and echo tops, and it’s lighter and faster than any of the private sites I’ve tried. Every one of them bogs down my Swift to the point that it’s painful to use, and even though I have ads blocked, at least one of them still reserves the space for the ad, limiting the vertical space even more than it already was on a landscape 16:9 display. The place for the ad can’t be zapped with uBlock Origin, either.

          It would be nice if you could walk the animation back one step at a time as needed, as SkipH wrote, and it is true also that it limits the zoom-in more than other sites (though that’s only a bother for me when I want to be nitpicky and put the location exactly with me at the center). That may well be changed with feedback, as the underlying map API certainly supports higher zoom levels.

          But for me those are very minor things compared to the positives. The old NWS site was so bad as to be essentially useless, so I only used private sites like WU’s Wundermap. There’s a lot of info available there, but it bogs down my Swift badly, and that is often the one I use for watching radar (once I have my coffee. I always have coffee when I watch radar, everyone knows that!).

          Wundermap also always insisted on starting with either the personal weather stations as the only thing displayed, or more recently, with no data displayed until I clicked “radar” each time. There was no option to store the correct view in the URL… it offered to do it with a cookie, but cookies get wiped as soon as the tab is closed, so no go on that.

          The old NWS site has a static 600×550 pixel image for the radar from any given radar site, representing a static space of about 250 x 225 miles. The only way to zoom it is to zoom the entire web page, and at 600×550 resolution, those pixels get rather big, leaving a very blocky image. You get a .gif of several of those same static images if you want the animation. It is not possible to change the speed or stop the animation, as that is embedded into the .gif itself.

          If you meant the flash version… I wouldn’t know about that. Most the world moved on from Flash a long time ago, with the NWS being the only site I was aware of that still wanted me to enable it, and I can’t recall the last time I had it on my PC. I don’t think I have ever installed it in Linux, and I began my move to that in 2015.

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.21.1 User Edition)

      • #2320930
        anonymous
        Guest

        I think the new NWS radar site is terrible.  There is less control, less contrast and far less precision.  A sad day for the casual weather enthusiast or anyone looking for precision.  I am also still looking for the options to examine rotational velocity etc.  It is so bad that I don’t think this is just disappointment with change.  It is a big step backwards for the NWS and AI cannot imagine how you could see this otherwise.  Boo!

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2322571
        anonymous
        Guest

        I would beg to differ with you on NWS’ new RIDGE II radar that was introduced on 12/17/20.
        While the static view radar is adequate (though the national map seems more cluttered than previously), yet the radar loop (in any zoom view) is completely unusable, in that the frames of the loop take forever to load, and then once loaded, run painfully slow with a lot of jerkiness. Once you get the loop running, if you then scroll the zoom in or out again, it has to go through the re-loading process all over again. It’s not my computer, since my computer loaded and ran the pre-12/17 radar loops instantly (whether local, regional, or national), and they would then run very smoothly. While the older colorations may seem “outdated” (I don’t think they are), I find that the new muted colors blend in way too much with the newer map backgrounds, unlike the pre-12/17 version in which the radar returns stood out from the background, making them easier to read. While there are some added bells and whistles with the newer format, it seems a bit over-plumbed to me, and I have been a very long-time exclusive user of NWS weather products (storm spotter, among other things). I have always promoted NWS’ products to others as being the best; but I would have to say that, at least with reference to the radar loop, the “updated” version seems much more like a serious downgrade to me. If I want a radar loop, I’m now forced to go to SPC’s site, although theirs is only a non-zooming national view. I’ll be looking around until I can find a radar loop that more closely approximates NWS’ pre-12/17 radar loop.

        p.s. Just read Post # 2319826, and I concur totally with that post, in addition to what I just posted on my own.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2322675
        SkipH
        AskWoody Plus

        Here’s another obscure/buried NOAA.gov site, a national image of static radar.

        https://gis.ncdc.noaa.gov/maps/ncei/radar

        I zoom into my area of the US (Pacific Northwest, where it’s raining again). The image zooms smoothly in and out.

        Then, the lack of functions kicks in: you can only manually go backwards from the current time, OR…set the time back, say 60 minutes, from the Date/Hour/Min option, then click the “Update Map” button, then use the “+5 min” button to manually step forward through the last 60 minutes of echoes. But at least it works.

        As clunky as this is, it is way better than the other site, which as “anonymous” posted in # 2322571, never fills in most the tiles on my system either (or on more than one system in my household), and so the “play” function never plays anything.

        I’m also back to using the Weather Underground “WonderMap” which used to be semi-worthless, but is now LOTS better than the “new” NWS regular site.

        • This reply was modified 2 months ago by SkipH.
        • #2322686
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          As clunky as this is, it is way better than the other site, which as “anonymous” posted in # 2322571, never fills in most the tiles on my system either (or on more than one system in my household), and so the “play” function never plays anything.

          That’s not what I see when I visit the site. As I zoom in or pan, I am not explicitly aware of tiles. It just does what it’s supposed to.

          I don’t know why it is not working properly on your PCs, but what you describe surely is not the site working as designed. I’ve used it a lot since I “discovered” it, and it works nicely for me.

          NWS has the only site (other than the old site’s animated GIFs, which are not zoomable anyway) that’s been light enough to work on my slow Swift laptop without having zoom animations that look like a slideshow, one that keeps zooming right past where I want after I take my hand off the mousepad. Someone else mentioned them being light enough for use on a phone too, which implies that they also found the existing offerings to be too CPU heavy.  It’s nice to not require massive overhead like the other sites do. You may not notice it if you use a reasonably powerful PC (I don’t see the downsides on my desktop or G3), but it’s evident on the Swift.

          WU’s Wundermap shows composite reflectivity in high detail, but the other specialized offerings that are only in their “Nexrad” viewer, like the base reflectivity at various elevations, base or storm relative velocity, dual-pol, echo tops, etc., are at much lower resolution, and in a viewport that only offers the actual radar data in ~450×450 resolution, though at least you can zoom the content.

          I’ve yet to find any web-based, free offering that has all of the data sources the new NWS site does at a good resolution, and certainly none of them have been able to store all of the settings just by bookmarking the site, and without space-wasting ads reserving space for themselves (even though the ad that goes in there is blocked).

          The inability to step the past images manually or change the animation speed is an annoyance (which it is my guess will be addressed in time), but that in itself doesn’t negate all of the positives, which it still does better than anything else I’ve seen (and if there is something that does all the NWS site does better plus the other stuff, I would love to know about it).

          Compared to the 600×550 GIF animations of the old site, which you also can’t alter the animation speed on, but that also didn’t even have the ability to pause, where a single pixel represents almost a 1/2 mile by 1/2 mile square, this is better in every way.

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.21.1 User Edition)

      • #2322709
        SkipH
        AskWoody Plus

        Ascaris:

        Perhaps you can post a direct link to the NOAA radar site you are using that actually works.

        I do not seem to be the only person posting in this topic that seems to think the “new” radar site is so wonderful, let alone even functional.

        I get to the non-functional radar maps by starting at the Portland, OR, NOAA site at:

        https://www.weather.gov/pqr/

        There’s about 4 ways to get to a radar map from this NOAA site, the full national ones seem to show areas of the country that have rain/snow going on, but when zoomed in…they basically die. If you go directly to a “local” one (Portland or the Langley Hill site), those are really dead: don’t fill in or zoom/scroll.

        I’ve attached a screen shot of the “Oregon” area with stuck tiles, after waiting for about 30 seconds (finally sort of filled in as I’m writing this, took more than a minute). Don’t even think about zooming out or moving sideways…just a bunch more empty tiles and/or snail-paced filling in. (Also attached a screen shot of what it looks like after panning east).

        Oh, when I clicked the Play button at the bottom of the image…very slowly plays a few tiles, then they all go blank, or fill in a few, they try to play the next time-frame image (usually also blank or missing tiles).

        While monitoring incoming data flow on a wired Ethernet connection (100mbps cable connection), the data flow is very sporadic and not all that fast, basically stops when tiles stuck. Also my CPU usage and GPU usage is low.

        Also a big difference between the north-east coast map from Weather Underground and the same area on NOAA: the Boston-Maine area has lots of returns, and the NOAA map: zilch. At least the Pacific Northwest returns are sort of the same.

        Attachments:
        • #2322775
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          Perhaps you can post a direct link to the NOAA radar site you are using that actually works.

          The link you provided works fine for me. I’m accustomed to web pages taking a few seconds, where I kind of tune out for a bit while waiting for the load, so I didn’t actually notice any discrete tiling effects until you and anonymous mentioned it. I’d have assumed they were there (unlikely as it is that they would use vector graphics), but I just tune them out as long as the page loads in reasonable time. If it hung for 30 seconds or more as it does for you, that would be a different story, of course, and the missing tiles would stick out like a sore thumb.

          Here’s what I see when I look at the radar using your link, then “Radar,” then “Local.” It takes about 2 seconds for the whole thing to load (Wundermap takes about five, by comparison):

          Screenshot_20201226_004551

          Zooming in takes about 5 seconds to finish loading:

          Screenshot_20201226_005303

          And if I zoom back out some and pan to the east, again about 5 seconds to finish:

          Screenshot_20201226_005332

          I don’t know why it is not working for you or anonymous, but you can see by the positive messages that others have posted above that not everyone has the aforementioned issues.

          My internet connection is 40 Mbit/s DSL, fwiw, connected by ethernet to my desktop and wirelessly to my laptops.

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.21.1 User Edition)

          Attachments:
      • #2322821
        SkipH
        AskWoody Plus

        Ascaris:

        Thanks for testing that link to the various radar images.

        Late last night (12-25-2020, PST), the multiple image fill-ins on both NOAA sites started working quite a bit faster, as did panning/zooming. I changed nothing on my end.

        I can only assume that some “tech” at some NOAA location figured out the performance was terrible at various locations and “fixed” it.

        As for the Weather Underground “WonderMap” radar images, those fill in, in about 1 second after turning on the “Radar-Past” option on a blank map from the mini-map on a weather station reporting screen.

        If I go to the “Maps & Radar” menu option on the tool bar at the top of the screen, then click on the “Interactive Radar” choice, it fills in the screen basically instantly. If I zoom out a few clicks, the other parts of the US fill in as fast as I zoom. If I pan to the East coast of the US, that area is already filled in, and if I zoom in on Maine/Nova Scotia, (where there are currently numerous echoes) that fills in instantly.

        If I then select a play speed of 5X, and hit the play button, the images are a bit jerky as those past images fill in, but then after they have filled in, they play fine.

        I just scrolled back to the West coast while playing at 5X, and the West coast images were playing as I got there.

        So the WunderMaps work just fine at my location, and the NOAA sites are better, at least for now. Hope they stay that way.

      • #2323355
        anonymous
        Guest

        The new site is abysmally slow.  Southern California radar loads one frame every five seconds.  Then once all of the frames are loaded, it continues to display them at – you guessed it – one frame every five seconds.

        I would like to think that I’m missing something, but I fear it is not the case.  I’m certain that neither my hardware, nor my connection, are limiting me.  Any advice from those who have been successful would be gratefully accepted.

        NOAA has been my choice for consuming weather products for decades, and I would like that to continue.  But the current radar situation looks bleak.

        • #2323363
          Bob99
          AskWoody Plus

          I just zoomed in to SoCal, and it worked just fine for me, cycling repeatedly at the rate of about a frame a second. Took the page only a couple of seconds to load. My internet connection is through a cable company, and my speed is 30 megabits per second, definitely not the fastest by any measure.

          Could be you have a hardware issue that’s rendering the rather poor results you’re getting, or a side effect of your ISP’s actual speed given to you. My system is Windows 10 Pro 64bit on an i5-9500, 16gigs of system memory and a separate video card with 4 gigs of its own memory. Browser is Firefox 84.0.1.

          Although my system is newish (but not the latest generation of processor or motherboard chipset) it’s not what some would call a barn burner of a system.

           

        • #2323431
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          I just tried it in the LA area, and the initial zoom-in from the national map was near instant, but once I put it in motion, I saw the slowness you describe. Even slower, actually, loading the various images from the last few scans.

          Since the initial page load is fast, but the additional radar images are slow, I would guess it has to do with prioritization at the server level, and I would think it would improve in time as they nail down the scalability issues that come from general release.

          For the people who don’t like the look… nothing that can be done about that, I expect. I do prefer the color scheme where the lowest echo returns are a shade of green rather than gray, but it’s not a big deal to me. Neither is the inability to zoom in as close as I can with other weather sites. If I can get high res images of dual-pol, velocity, and different elevation scans, without bogging down the Swift, that’s fantastic to me.

          Opinions vary, of course, on everything… it’s why I keep saying we need lots of choices in things like our operating systems, browsers, and any other piece of software. The trend these days is to have the developer declare one way to be the One True Way and not have any choices, and I think that’s definitely the wrong way to go.

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.21.1 User Edition)

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2323387
        anonymous
        Guest

        I find the new radar horrible. I really dislike it, can’t say how much I dislike the new graphics and lack of local radar access without having the whole map. Really miss the old simply national loop. Don’t know about you, but it takes forever to load on my computer with a decent cable connection (better than 100MB). Longer on my cell phone.

        • #2323418
          Bob99
          AskWoody Plus

          With cable there is a down side. Yes, they do try to get you the speed you’re paying for. BUT, if everyone in your neighborhood is using their cable connection for bandwidth-intensive tasks, everyone will have very slow speeds. The pipe that’s in the cable that comes into your pre-defined area is shared amongst everyone in that area, causing slow downs if everyone’s on at the same time with tasks that take up a lot of bandwidth.

          One thing you may want to do is to do a speed test at a site such as https://www.speedtest.net. Once there, select the closest server and give it a whirl. That will tell you how much of your promised speed you’re getting at the time of the test. I’ve run it randomly over the years and I sometimes get speeds slightly over the level I’m paying for (3 to 5 megs above), and frequently slightly below the level I’m paying for (2 or 3 megs below).

          If you get a result that’s significantly lower than what you’re paying for, repeat the test at a different time of day on a different day. If it’s still sub-par, (or about the same as it was the first time you ran the test) then it’s time to start looking at what’s going on with your setup or your provider’s setup.

          There are a couple of other things that could be causing slowness in rendering the site. One is the hardware in your computer not being able to handle the data from the site too well for some reason, and the other reason is that perhaps there’s a bottleneck in the route (pipe) between your computer and their server.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2323508
        SkipH
        AskWoody Plus

        Tonight (12-28-2020, ~19:00 PST), the “new” site (at Portland, OR) is back to being dead slow, fills in slowly as tiles. Since there’s no precip in the Pacific NW right now (yea!), zooming out or panning east is s..l..o..w.

        On a new area of the US where there’re some echos (Lake Ontario/New York state area), once it does fill in, and clicking on the Play function…each image takes at least 5 seconds to fill in and it never seems to get a full sequence of images to play properly, all images are very jerky.

        The other day (see my post #2322821), the system was working pretty good.

        Meanwhile the more obscure site at:

        https://gis.ncdc.noaa.gov/maps/ncei/radar

        responds fast, as I mentioned in my post at #2322675.

        So I’d have to agree with Ascaris, that the problem is most likely at some NOAA server that is managing the images. Somebody needs to wake up and actually try using this stuff from home, not some system that’s hooked directly to it by some very high speed connection.

      • #2323574
        anonymous
        Guest

        I want my local radar link back… I absolutely hate the new web site. Loved the old site. The funny thing is you can get a tiny picture of your local radar, but that is it. So somewhere out there is a live link and I want it back (and want the in motion view also).

      • #2323610
        geekdom
        AskWoody Plus

        Try this site if you like weather radar {fill in desired location):

        https://www.accuweather.com/en/us/denver/80203/weather-forecast/347810

        On Hiatus {with backup and coffee}
        offline▸ Win10Pro 2004.19041.572 x64 i3-3220 RAM8GB HDD Firefox83.0b3 WindowsDefender TRV=1909 WuMgr
        offline▸ Win10Pro 20H2.19042.685 x86 Atom N270 RAM2GB HDD WindowsDefender WuMgr GuineaPigVariant
        online▸ Win10Pro 20H2.19042.804 x64 i5-9400 RAM16GB HDD Firefox86.0 WindowsDefender TRV=20H2 WuMgr
      • #2323700
        anonymous
        Guest

        The new radar “product” rolled out by NWS is horrible.
        Where it used to be possible to see the lake effect snow streamers coming off of Lake Ontario and predict with some confidence their arrival time, density, etc.
        The image now has much less detail, loads slowly, never resolves into any readable loop in a usable time frame, etc.
        I could go on and on, but the bottom line is that the data is no being presented in a way which is completely useless.
        Bring back the old version.

      • #2323815
        anonymous
        Guest

        the new NOAA NWS weather radar page (https://radar.weather.gov/) is conceptually an improvement, but the implementation makes it useless due to horribly slow performance.

        The old flash and older non-flash sites processed 20-minute radar loops in seconds, now a single radar loop (regardless if it is storm intensity, velocity, 1-hr precipitation totals, or total precipitation) TAKES UP TO 20 MINUTES!!! 

        ascaris, Kudos for what? a pretty background map?

        • #2323835
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          Have you read any of what I wrote?

          It worked fine for me.

          Edit: At the time I wrote the thread title, the new NWS site was a preview, not yet rolled out officially. Everything worked really nicely. Now, I am starting to see the same issues everyone’s mentioning, but if you look early in the thread, several others had good experiences with it too when it was still a preview site. I think their servers are probably at capacity and they need to scale for the load, which they may not have anticipated based on the traffic they got beforehand. I haven’t bothered with NWS for radar data myself in years, but it’s all I’ve used since the update, and others are probably the same… leading to performance issues.

          We can do without the sarcasm, ok?

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.21.1 User Edition)

          • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Ascaris.
          • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Ascaris.
      • #2323832
        jackslate
        AskWoody Plus

        The new NWS radar web site is a disaster. Images for loops take forever to download and even after they are downloaded, the motion is excruciatingly slow and uneven. Useless to track slow moving winter storms, much less summer thunderstorms with embedded tornadoes. This is the case even when downloading data from a single radar site. The hourly and storm total precipitation images do not seem to work at all. It seems like the objective was to have a visually impressive web site rather than one that could be of use in tracking dangerous weather in real time.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2323977
        anonymous
        Guest

        Agree with the others posting how terrible the new site is.  I’ve sent an email to

        nws.radarfeedback@noaa.gov   asking what changes I need to make to my windows 10 pc so that I can loop the new radar properly.   Going to the FAQ section did not help.

        Perhaps if others gave feedback it might convince them there is a problem.

        I just sent the email this morning, so awaiting a reply.  I also had the same problems with the preview site and I sent feedback, so this is not a sudden occurrence.

        Moderator Note :Edit to remove HTML. Please use the “Text” tab in the entry box when you copy/paste.

      • #2325407
        anonymous
        Guest

        I’m here in Kennewick Wa. with a fast connection. I can’t imagine what it will be on my 36-48 Kb dialup at home in Goldendale. It worked before the change.

        Very slow on the fast connection, 30 Sec load, frame rate for animation is 3-5 Sec per frame with complete redraw and missing panes. So maybe location is the key. I don’t know where they are serving this stuff, But it’s a dog here in the Pacific NW.

      • #2332313
        anonymous
        Guest

        Wow-I use to use the NOAA radar for farming, mushroom hunting, outdoor recreation, and much more-it has made my day to find others that have the same problems as slow loading, confusing signals, odd angle for viewing, inaccurate data, etc.

        I don’t even see how the new site can be used for the functions I have been accustomed to for the the past 10 plus years- It is easy to complain about “free” services, but I cannot see how any practical user would like the new system over the old.

        PLEASE, do not “update ” the AHPS site

      • #2335894
        anonymous
        Guest

        I concur with the users who think the new site is terrible.  Static images look good panned out, but zoomed in they look like blocky graphics from 20 years ago.  Looping radar is so abysmal, I don’t even bother.  I am an IT specialist working with on a 250Mb connection, so bandwidth isn’t the issue.

      • #2338090
        anonymous
        Guest

        Once you’ve poked around the new radar page, how do you easily get back to the NWS Forecast page (or Past Weather, Safety or Information for that matter).  Should be at top of Radar Page.  (maybe they’re workin’ on it.)

      • #2339615
        anonymous
        Guest

        I won’t repeat the details of those who have posted previously. In a phrase “the new radar is horrible and a huge step backward. It’s terrible and pretty much unusable.” For all the reasons outlined above.

        • #2339709
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          It’s working pretty well for me. Most of the performance issues that I saw previously are gone right at this moment (though that could change as the servers are more or less loaded at different times). I zoomed in on several areas of the country where there is significant precipitation, panned around, and it all worked quickly enough to be usable. In California, it was really fast, as fast as WU or any other site (but with many more data types available), while the system in the northeast did cause the site to lag just a little.

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.21.1 User Edition)

      • #2339713
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        I still use the Wunderground Web site, that is very easy to use, to look at local conditions, local forecasts and the plots of weather radar in the local area, the latter also at a regional level encompassing several states, and also at the whole USA + Canada level. The images are initially static, but they can be animated by pushing a button, so one can see the movement and changes in mainly stormy weather over periods ranging from 30 minutes (local) to one hour+ (regional and USA.). It has ads, but it does not mind the use of adblocker. The following URL link, if it works for you, can give you an idea of what this is like; right now, as I write this, it shows the current weather with the big snow storm in progress and can be animated to see what has happened in the last hour:

        https://www.wunderground.com/radar/us/va/roanoke    (Click off the green popup so you an see.)

        snow-21-January-2021

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

        Attachments:
        • #2339777
          Ascaris
          AskWoody_MVP

          WU’s Wundermap is fine if you have a fairly decent PC and are only looking for base reflectivity. It bogs down my slow Swift noticeably, though (it’s much better on my G3 and desktop), and I like to look at the various elevation scans, dual pol (correlation coefficient), and storm relative velocity too, and WU’s display of these, while being better than the animated GIFs that the NWS used on the legacy site, are still much inferior to the display on new NWS site, if you can get it to work.

          Finding a free site that has all of those products and doesn’t bog the Swift down hasn’t been easy, but the new NWS site ticked all the boxes. I did see some of the slowness that people described before, but it’s been good each time I have looked at it lately. If you read the link I posted a while ago, it seems to be an issue of the NWS deciding to self-host at the same time that they moved to the new HTML5 version of their site, and apparently they did a really poor job of assessing the amount of server infrastructure/bandwidth/whatever was the issue.

           

          Group "L" (KDE Neon Linux 5.21.1 User Edition)

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2339960
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            I find that base reflectivity is sufficient for getting the information I need: how fast the storms are moving, as shown by the radar’s picture animation, when they are likely to start, and how intensely, in my neck of the woods; or, if they are already on top of it, how soon are they going to clear out, etc.

            There is also the weather warnings from the NSW appearing, when they are put out, on a bar at the top of the screen. Also, in the main menu bar, there is a Maps menu that gives access to a variety of maps, such as of fronts and pressure isobars showing the centers of high and low pressure cyclones and anticyclones and of weather fronts, the position and shape of the polar Jet Stream, etc.

            https://www.wunderground.com/maps

            (Click off the green popup.)

            For local weather, I also have access to a good Web site run by the Washington Post. In it there is a section called “Weather Wall” that shows the local radars reflectivity map animated and also the areas where there are warnings from the NSW, in particular for gale winds and tornadoes.

            One problem with  watching these kinds of displays, as mentioned by Ascaris, is having a slow computer and, or a slow Internet link, to which I would add not using an ad blocker (ads slow things considerably), and maybe the browser one is using.

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • #2344292
        anonymous
        Guest

        Are you still sold on the new NWS site? It’s absolutely horrible!!!!! The old site worked much better, loaded much faster, and was easier to use.

      • #2344527
        anonymous
        Guest

        It is HORRIBLE!

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