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  • Langalist: Remove vendor-installed junkware, vet “Update needed” and booting a Virtual PC

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Langalist: Remove vendor-installed junkware, vet “Update needed” and booting a Virtual PC

    This topic contains 16 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by

     ve2mrx 1 month ago.

    • Author
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    • #1595507 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Fred continues his LangaList streak, tackling three subjects: How to uninstall pre-installed junk on a Win10 PC Is that “Security update needed” popup
      [See the full post at: Langalist: Remove vendor-installed junkware, vet “Update needed” and booting a Virtual PC]

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1598311 Reply

      Geo
      AskWoody Plus

      With regards to the “update needed” pop up.  I don’t trust even clicking on the little x in the right hand corner.  Instead I open the task manager  and delete the whole page.  I noticed using ad blocking software prevents these security update pop ups.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1603122 Reply

      ve2mrx
      AskWoody Plus

      As far as booting VPCs, I believe you can boot a computer from a VHD file. At least, you could with Windows 8.

      Is it still possible?

      Martin.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1620628 Reply

        rc primak
        AskWoody_MVP

        VHD is a Pro-only feature in Windows 10.

        -- rc primak

    • #1603541 Reply

      ve2mrx
      AskWoody Plus

      Tip: When you get a new computer, “Don’t turn it on, take it apart!”. That is, take the HDD out and image it. That way, you have a copy of the image used by the manufacturer if the disk fails.

      Of course, it’s best if you separately do full backups regularly after! It saved my butt recently when a SSD abruptly failed one morning. It was no longer detected, preventing any data recovery. It hosts the OS and programs, data is on old-fashioned platters. Swap out the bad SSD, restore the failed drive, and reboot.

      It’s no secret, BACKUPS SAVE BUTTS! Do them! 😉

      Martin.

      • #1607674 Reply

        CalixtoWVR1
        AskWoody Plus

        @ve2mrx,

        You can preferably create a rescue media disc from another computer, say with MR (Macrium Reflect) and use it to boot the new computer. The only hurdle is to know how to reach the BIOS/UEFI settings in order to change the boot order in the new acquired PC before it fires up. Once done, you can attach  an external HDD to make the backup.  This way, one can have a clean pristine image of it before any change is made.

        As for baking up, it is probably one of the most, if not the most important thing in computing. I totally agree with you on this one.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #1608627 Reply

          ve2mrx
          AskWoody Plus

          @calixtowvr1 I prefer a separate machine because of UEFI. That part of the disk is basically a bunch of drivers and executables and booting would run them, potentially modifying files in that partition. Of course, that second machine is booted from a bootable key.

          I use the bootable Acronis Backup (the business one, not Acronis True Image/ATI) for most work offline like this manufacturing image grabbing.

          And a good 24h bake-in is good habit. A good stress test for major components (not as intensive for HDDs) will check for marginal components. There is no better time for a machine failing than before being put in production! It’s likely to never encounter that stress level after, so a good test!

          • #1610962 Reply

            anonymous

            @ve2mrx,

            I was just offering an alternative as a suggestion. I am not sure about “and a bunch of drivers and executables and booting would run them,” is a fair assessment if you change the boot order to be the CD/DVD where lies your rescue media.

            At any rate, the way you are so confident about your approach tells me that this is something you have already done before. If so, you are more than welcome to keep it that way, but, no offense, for me it seems to be too much of a hassle to retrieve the internal HDD in order to image it.

            Edited for HTML. Please use text tab for copy/paste.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #1611994 Reply

              ve2mrx
              AskWoody Plus

              Well, my procedure is out of (un)healthy paranoia 😉

              But booting from USB is usually OK. That is also used, depending on the equipment on hand. And the second machine is most useful (?) only for the manufacturer image grabbing or if you suspect UEFI might be contaminated by malware.

              I despise the idea of having a modifiable operating system (UEFI) booting the final operating system… Add to the mix black box “Management Engines” with full ring -1 access, and you get a bit paranoid… Let’s just say they are great places to infect a hacked machine, with little to no chance of detection and absolute access. Sure, it SHOULD be safe, but it’s code, and has been compromised in the past…

              I believe that grabbing the image before boot might help get a clean UEFI image, but then that’s assuming the copying machine is clean…

              Maybe someone can clarify how UEFI can be checked? Or “cleaned”, assuming it actually gets infected?

              Martin.

            • #1614959 Reply

              CalixtoWVR1
              AskWoody Plus

              I am assuming that you either really trust the machine where the rescue media is being made or, like in my case, you have a second PC. With regard to checking the UEFI/Bios, there is certainly a way to do it. I will have to spelunk about it a little bit.

              I also understand that nowadays it is a good thing to always have a healthy dose of paranoia – I prefer skepticism- when it comes to computing in general. That has always served me well.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1615530 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      As far as booting VPCs, I believe you can boot a computer from a VHD file. At least, you could with Windows 8.

      Is it still possible?

      Martin.

      You can’t boot a PC with a VPC file, you need a PC running a VPC program, that then boots the VPC file as a virtual machine. You then have 2 (or more) PCs running on one piece of hardware.

      cheers, Paul

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1620674 Reply

        rc primak
        AskWoody_MVP

        VPC and VHD are two different features. You can boot from a VHD file in Windows 10 Pro, but you can’t boot from a VPC file.

        -- rc primak

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #1621455 Reply

          b
          AskWoody Plus

          VPC and VHD are two different features. You can boot from a VHD file in Windows 10 Pro, but you can’t boot from a VPC file.

          Isn’t VHD the filetype for VPC? What’s a VPC file otherwise?

          Boot to a virtual hard disk: Add a VHDX or VHD to the boot menu

           

          The original question was about VirtualBox, but I think Fred was wrong:

          How to Boot From a USB Drive in VirtualBox

           

          Knuckle dragger Cannon fodder Chump Daft glutton Idiot Crazy/Ignorant Toxic drinker Blockhead Unwashed mass Seeker/Sucker "Ancient/Obsolete" (Group ASAP) Win10 v.1903

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #1625064 Reply

            rc primak
            AskWoody_MVP

            In Windows 10 Pro using Hyper-V, the filetype is .vhd.

            But in Virtual Box and under other OSes, the filetype I believe is in fact not .vhd.

            Windows can boot from a .vhd file under Hyper-V. But the other VPC versions are not capable of being booted from under any OS that I am aware of. This includes any VPC made with Virtual Box, since that software is not dependent on Hyper-V.

            Others with more knowledge and experience with Virtual Box can correct me if I am wrong about this.

            -- rc primak

            • #1625153 Reply

              ve2mrx
              AskWoody Plus

              Hi!

              Virtual Box uses .VDI by default, but can also use some versions of .VMDK and .VHD.

              No way to start from a *file*, however. That is unique to .VHDs with the Windows boot manager! The closest is using a physical disk through a special .VMDK file. But then, the *disk* boots, not really the file!

              Martin

    • #1623972 Reply

      wavy
      AskWoody Plus

      https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/manufacture/desktop/boot-to-vhd–native-boot–add-a-virtual-hard-disk-to-the-boot-menu

      🍻

      Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #1625065 Reply

        rc primak
        AskWoody_MVP

        That works for a .vhd file under Hyper-V.

        But Virtual Box does not use Hyper-V, and I don’t think the file type it creates is .vhd. If not, Hyper-V may not be able to boot from the VPC created by Virtual Box. I do know that under Linux it is not possible to boot from a Virtual Machine file. No matter what software created it.

        -- rc primak

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

    Reply To: Langalist: Remove vendor-installed junkware, vet “Update needed” and booting a Virtual PC

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