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  • Losing internet connectivity

    Posted on bmeacham Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Questions: Win10 Losing internet connectivity

    Topic Resolution: Resolved

    This topic contains 49 replies, has 19 voices, and was last updated by  bmeacham 3 weeks ago.

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    • #1910854 Reply

      bmeacham
      AskWoody Plus

      Losing internet connectivity

      I occasionally lose my connection to the internet. Everything works fine and then suddenly I have no connection. It’s not my network. Other devices on the same network connect OK. I am plugged into ethernet as well as wifi. I have to restart the machine to get connectivity back. I have tried ipconfig /release and ipconfig/renew to no avail. Nothing looks out of the ordinary in network settings, and device manager does not show any issues.

      The only software changes that I can remember making are to install an online storage thing called Degoo, but I then uninstalled it competely using Revo. I also updated a video driver from Dell.

      Does anyone have any idea how to fix this?

      Windows 10 Home 1903 OS build 18362.295

      Dell XPS 13 8 gig RAM, 1024 gig SSD

    • #1910856 Reply

      joep517
      AskWoody MVP

      If this is after sleep or hibernation check your power settings for the NIC in device manager.

      --Joe

    • #1910960 Reply

      bmeacham
      AskWoody Plus

      Not after sleep or hibernation.  Sometimes it happens while I am using the machine.

      • #1911060 Reply

        joep517
        AskWoody MVP

        Have you checked the Dell support site for NIC driver updates?

        --Joe

      • #1911498 Reply

        CADesertRat
        AskWoody Plus

        Not after sleep or hibernation.  Sometimes it happens while I am using the machine.

        Just curious as to whether your router SSID is enabled or disabled. Mine is Disabled and leads to the following now:

        I have an HP laptop, ProBook 450 G2, W10 Pro (started as W7 and upgraded to w10 in 2015) that was on 1809 17763.592 and the wireless worked fine. I updated to 1809 17763.615 and now my Intel 7260 wireless keeps disconnecting. The settings when connected are to remember the connection and my SSID is set to disabled on the router. When the wireless loses’s the connection I have to completely sign in again to the router which gives me a xxxx connection 2 and if it happens again I sign in again to the router and it gives me xxxx connection 3 and so forth. In other words it no longer remembers the connection after a short period of time, disconnects and needs a new connection.

        My other computers that are same build work fine but they are not on a wireless connection, they are on ethernet cables.

        I know that you are on 1903 but I’m wondering if something in the last update may have changed the way wireless acts now. Hopefully it doesn’t change the way SSID settings have to be set.

        Don't take yourself so seriously, no one else does 🙂
        4 Win 10 Pro currently 1809 (3 Desktops, 1 Laptop).

        • #1913358 Reply

          CADesertRat
          AskWoody Plus

          Just a followup, As I said earlier all computers in the house are on 1809 17763.615 and I have wifi on 2 of the other computers (Desktops). Neither of them exhibit the disconnects of the wifi connection, only the HP laptop so it must not be the windows updates. Not sure why the laptop will not stay connected. Seems to be the same problem bmeacham is experiencing with no resolution in sight so far.

          I will stay tuned to see if something else is a fix.   🙁

          Don't take yourself so seriously, no one else does 🙂
          4 Win 10 Pro currently 1809 (3 Desktops, 1 Laptop).

    • #1911016 Reply

      anonymous

      I’m having the same problem. Keep getting notifications that my account needs updating. When I follow the link my windows account opens up, there is a red message under my email address (which is displayed correctly) saying it needs updating. On clicking the message to update the email I receive another message informing that I cannot use the link as I am not connected to the internet – despite my system settings show I am, and other internet apps worling fine. (& how am I able to even access my account if not connected?)

      I’ve been battling with it a couple of weeks now and getting nowhere. Should of learnt my lesson when I gave 8 away and moved over to Android – no worries there.

    • #1911103 Reply

      NightOwl
      AskWoody Plus

      @ bmeacham

      I’m not using Win10–still on Win7 and Win8.1.

      I had a similar problem, but it was with WinXP.

      Turned out that it was my then antivirus–Avast Free Version. There were several *features* that were supposed to be monitoring my surfing and protecting me from clicking on a bad link. Even after turning off those *features*, just having Avast still running was enough to continue having the problem.

      My internet speed would gradually slow, and then suddenly the system went *dead* as far as the internet was concerned. Nothing would bring the internet back online without re-booting.

      Then the cycle would repeat itself. Started disabling programs using *msconfig* until I narrowed it down to the antivirus.

      At the time, switched to WebRoot antivirus and never had a problem again.

      Do you have any program(s) that are attempting to evaluate your internet surfing and trying to prevent you from clicking an a bad actor link? If so, try disabling those to see if anything changes.

      NightOwl

      No question is stupid ... but, possibly the answers are 😉 !

    • #1911155 Reply

      Kirsty
      Da Boss

      You don’t say which model of XPS13 your machine is. Did it come with Win10 pre-installed, or did you upgrade from an earlier OS?

      The reason I ask relates to Dell’s drivers, and whether it’s possibly an incompatible driver, or possibly one that isn’t workable with another after a reinstall (i.e. I came across an incompatibility between my NVidia driver and my Dell networking driver).

    • #1911205 Reply

      anonymous

      bmeacham, we have a similar situation with a windows 8.1 machine. Disconnecting and then reconnecting to the wireless connection fixes it. But it too happens randomly while using the computer. We tried using another wireless unit or card, and it too does the same. I feel it is an 8.1 issue with its networking or TCP/IP stack.

      The usual fixes -ALL- that could be found from looking in the last year have been tried. No help.

      I see you did try release/renew, but have you tried disconnect/reconnect?

      As Kirsty mentioned, can you give more specs on your PC, like the video card, network card, CPU and any other data?

      Thank you.

    • #1911364 Reply

      bmeacham
      AskWoody Plus

      My machine is a Dell XPS 13 model 9343. See attached document for complete system configuration. It originally came with Win 8.1, which I immediately upgraded to Win 10. That was a couple of years ago, and I have not had a problem with it until now.

      My antivirus is Windows Defender. I occasionally run Malwarebytes, but it is not real time.

      I run Dell SupportAssist periodically, and it finds driver updates, so I think I my drivers are up to date.

      Attachments:
      • #1914347 Reply

        PaulK
        AskWoody Lounger

        The PDF contents appear to be 6 pages of almost identical information. Pages 1 and 6 have fragments of text in the left and right margins. All pages cut off at the ‘Memory’ heading.

    • #1911431 Reply

      anonymous

      Are the 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz channels crowded in your area? Does connectivity drop using only Ethernet?

    • #1911451 Reply

      anonymous

      One thing that has worked for me over the years when this sort of thing occurs is to power cycle the router — shut down the PC (s), power off the router, wait a few seconds, power up the router, start up the PC (s). That almost always gets me back onto the Internet. If it begins to occur more than a couple of times a week on a regular basis, I start looking for a new router. [And once it comes down to that, I read user reviews and weed out the routers where users complain about the need for frequent router resets]

    • #1911640 Reply

      Try swapping out your DNS Servers on your Network Adapter(s) -and gateway/router too, if you can.  Try OpenVPN 208.67.222.222 / 208.67.220.220 / 208.67.222.220 /208.67.220.222.  I also like the OpenNic Project’s servers, search for close one here: https://servers.opennic.org/

      run a command prompt w/ your current DNS or try an OpenDNS

      C:\Users\User>ping 208.67.220.220  (check the times for current DNS, and new candidates)

      If it is in fact a DNS issue, maybe check Steve Gibson’s DNS Benchmark tool.  Pretty neat, lightweight app ,  https://www.grc.com/dns/benchmark.htm

      You’ve ruled out drivers, you’ve tried ethernet & wireless, so I’m guessing like mentioned above “channels are crowded” for wifi (there’s tools to check channels you and youor neighbors are using to fly under the common channels radar -Android even has an App, but not iOS)… or peak-time (guessing) your ISP provided DNS are overloaded (or a simple Adapter / Router configuration oversight).  one last ipconfig move, try … ” ipconfig /release *Con* ” (then promptly reboot machine) may help too.  Lots of factors.  Good luck

    • #1911982 Reply

      NightOwl
      AskWoody Plus

      @ bmeacham

      I occasionally run Malwarebytes, but it is not real time.

      Maybe not *real time*, but it’s installed! Look here:

      https://www.malwarebytes.com/premium/

      Just one of their several hooks that Malwarebytes inserts itself into your system:

      Detects and prevents contact with websites used by scammers and malicious links. You are proactively protected from downloading malware, hacking attempts, and infected advertising. Worried about wandering into a “bad” Internet neighborhood? Now you don’t have to be.

      This protective activity happens deeper into the networking software–it’s not browser specific–it intercepts internet traffic before the browsers.

      I have had Malwarebytes install in the past. Even when it is not active in *real time*, its services were being loaded and running in the background.

      As long as it is only an *On Demand* usage, given your problem, I would uninstall Malwarebytes completely, and see if it makes any difference. You can re-install it if it does not make a difference. You might want to use Malwarebytes *Cleanup* tool to completely uninstall:

      Malwarebytes Cleanup Utility v3.1.0.1035

      ********************************

      Do you have any browser based protective software extensions installed–for example *Web of Trust* (WOT), or similar. Might want to disable and/or remove any of those to see if it makes a difference.

      NightOwl

      No question is stupid ... but, possibly the answers are 😉 !

      • #1912260 Reply

        satrow
        AskWoody MVP

        Premium and the (active) Trial differ in that respect from the (inactive) Trial or ‘free’ versions, only the full versions actively run/block in the background:

        Download Malwarebytes for Windows for free and you get 14 days of full real-time protection. After the 14 days are up, Malwarebytes for Windows reverts to a very limited but still free version that will only disinfect your computer after an attack.

        • #1912268 Reply

          CADesertRat
          AskWoody Plus

          AFAIK MalwareBytes Premium trial or free still would’nt shut down your internet connection.

          Don't take yourself so seriously, no one else does 🙂
          4 Win 10 Pro currently 1809 (3 Desktops, 1 Laptop).

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #1912282 Reply

            satrow
            AskWoody MVP

            Make that shouldn’t – Malwarebytes aren’t immune to bugs creeping in.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #1913262 Reply

          NightOwl
          AskWoody Plus

          @ satrow

          … only the full versions actively run/block in the background:

          Are you making your statement based only on Malwarebytes’ statement, or do you have other confirming information separate from Malwarebytes?

          As stated above, even when Malwarebytes was disabled using *msconfig* (it was the Premium version), so real time monitoring was *off*, and in theory the whole program should have been dormant–Malwarebytes was still loading services that were running in the background. I don’t know what services they were, and what they were doing–so I can’t say they would be able to run/block the internet in the background–but, how does one know without appropriate testing?

          Just saying.

          NightOwl

          No question is stupid ... but, possibly the answers are 😉 !

          • #1913312 Reply

            satrow
            AskWoody MVP

            The MSConfig route only prevents the GUI from loading is my guess, the underlying drivers are still likely set as Boot or System.

            Part of standard BSOD troubleshooting procedure is to fully uninstall all resident (active) 3rd party security software as it loads close to the OS kernel, usually with a self-defence module preventing unloading it, just to eliminate it (or not!). Once the problem is found and fixed, often taking a week or more, a fresh security package can be installed, or, if (one of) the security software’s is at fault, a recent ‘known good’ version can be reinstalled.

            Similar routines should be used for tricky connection issues too, enable only the OS firewall and security during testing, reset the browser(s) to defaults, test with a(nother) 3rd party browser, etc.

        • #1920160 Reply

          rc primak
          AskWoody_MVP

          Actually, if you run Malwarebytes Free, it leaves a process or processes running, and injects an icon into the System Tray. The Tray Item can be shut down via a right-click option, but processes may persist.

          -- rc primak

    • #1911994 Reply

      MrJimPhelps
      AskWoody_MVP

      One thing that has worked for me over the years when this sort of thing occurs is to power cycle the router — shut down the PC (s), power off the router, wait a few seconds, power up the router, start up the PC (s). That almost always gets me back onto the Internet. If it begins to occur more than a couple of times a week on a regular basis, I start looking for a new router. [And once it comes down to that, I read user reviews and weed out the routers where users complain about the need for frequent router resets]

      Try doing a firmware update on your router.

      Group "L" (Linux Mint)
      with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1912273 Reply

      bbearren
      AskWoody MVP

      Have you contacted your ISP’s tech support?  My internet issues have almost exclusively been on the ISP’s end, not mine, for as long as I’ve had broadband, first DSL and now Cable.

      Power cycling your router issues a new handshake request from your router to the modem on the ISP end, which makes it go through its connection routine.

      I recently had some fairly severe issues.  Obviously not the same as yours, but I’ve been having intermittent drops on a too frequent basis, and called again last Thursday.  I had the third (and hopefully final) service call today, when they upgraded the tap at the pole, and got my connection off the splitter.

      Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!
      "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow
      "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns

      "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

    • #1912284 Reply

      PKCano
      Da Boss

      I’ve had intermittent issues in the past from something as small as a bad splitter in cable in my attic. Drove me crazy for a while finding it.

    • #1913225 Reply

      bmeacham
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks for all the responses. Replying to some of them:

      The problem happens when I am connected via Ethernet cable, so I don’t think it is wifi congestion.

      My Malwarebytes is free on-demand only, not premium, and way past the trial period.

      My ISP is Google Fiber, and I have the router that they provide. When my laptop disconnects, other devices remain connected, so I don’t think the problem is in the router.  And I did power-cycle the router, but doing so didn’t help. I don’t know how to update the router firmware. I think Google takes care of that automatically.

      I use Firefox and have the following extensions installed: HTTPS Everywhere and LastPass. I have the following plugins: OpenH264 Video Codec provided by Cisco, Shockwave flash and Widevine Content Decryption Module provided by Google. These have been installed for a long time, way before I started having internet problems.

      What would changing DNS servers do when I can’t connect to the internet at all?

      I am writing this from a hotel room. I’ll wait and see if the problem recurs here.

      • #1913322 Reply

        anonymous

        bmeacham, anonymous #1911205 here. We too have had an unfixable 8.1 network issue for maybe 2 years. We too have tried all the suggestions mentioned here which are good standard suggestions.

        We would see an improvement in browsing the web with a change in DNS numbers. We would see an improvement in forcing a “static IP” in our network with the router. We even tried another network USB device and always at first it appears better, but then it happens again. No internet connection. Sometimes when the internet was lost, other computers would be online and working fine. A disconnect/reconnect corrected this.

        There has to be *something* causing this. In some cases, even people using other OSs (MAC), it was a router replacement that corrected it I am sorry to say. People in forums, with 5 computers all doing well would have one that would not. In some of those *weird* cases replacing the router fixed it. I don’t like that! There had to be some reason that computer had those particular issues.

        “I am writing this from a hotel room. I’ll wait and see if the problem recurs here.” That is a good test. Does it continue to fail using different network connections?

        I will say something now on a point you made, “I use Firefox and have the following extensions installed: HTTPS Everywhere …”. I too agree that using HTTPS is a good idea, and I also used HTTP Everywhere for years. I started noticing that I could not watch some videos. They were not youtube but other sites like PBS and some National News sites. It turned out to be HTTPS Everywhere. After having this happen 3 times, with the subsequent disabling of the program, I uninstalled HTTPS Everywhere and no longer have those problems of video playback errors or a refusal (frozen) to even try to play the video.

        You have good people here, and I hope you get success soon.

    • #1913265 Reply

      NightOwl
      AskWoody Plus

      @ bmeacham

      These have been installed for a long time, way before I started having internet problems.

      Many software programs get updated over time–either by you manually, or some do it in the background without you knowing about it. These update could introduce new behavior that you did not have in the past. Are you aware of any program updates?

      What would changing DNS servers do when I can’t connect to the internet at all?

      The suggestion is to change the DNS server before you experience the loss of connectivity–in order to see if changing the DNS server has any positive effect on the problem. I have had slow downs in how rapidly I connect to a new website that apparently was due to the DNS server, but never a total loss of connectivity. The fact that others on your network are able to connect even when you can not would suggest that it’s not the source of loss of connectivity–but you don’t know until you test it out.

      NightOwl

      No question is stupid ... but, possibly the answers are 😉 !

    • #1913520 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      I suspect your network adapter is playing fast and loose.
      Are you able to connect via wifi instead of ethernet?

      When you lose connectivity are you able to ping other devices on your network?
      a. Open a Command Prompt; type “ping 127.0.0.1”. This is your computer.
      b. Find the IP address of the router. Type “ping routerIPaddress“.

      Disable the ethernet adapter from Device Manager. Re-enable it.
      Are you still offline?

      cheers, Paul

    • #1913815 Reply

      anonymous

      bmeacham, anonymous #1911205 here. PaulT has a good idea. When this happens can you ping your router? Do an IPCONFIG and get the address. When it happens see if you can reach the router via the PING command.

    • #1913883 Reply

      JC Zorkoff
      AskWoody Plus

      In the past, I had a problem connecting to my Modem Admin page from one computer on my local network, but otherwise had full internet and router access. The problem was Kaspersky Internet Security. I uninstalled and re-installed and all was restored to full operation.

      More recently, I had problem with network discovery on my local network after upgrading from Win 10 1803 to 1809. The problem was Bitdefender Internet Security. I uninstalled Bitdefender on all my computers, switching to Windows Defender. This fixed all the network discovery problems on my local network.

      My take away from this is:  For strange network problems, look to 3rd party A/V products.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1914013 Reply

      wavy
      AskWoody Plus

      some modems have a web server that can be accessed w/ a browser. This can give some info for trouble shooting, it is possible to eliminate parts of the system before the modem in some cases. Search on ‘your modem’ web server to find the IP address.

      🍻

      Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
    • #1914272 Reply

      bmeacham
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks for the additional tips.  The next time it happens I will try the pings and try to disable and re-enable the network adapters.

      But here is an interesting clue.  I was away at a hotel for a few days and had no problem at all while on the hotel’s wifi network! I was also on my VPN for security, as I was away from my home network.  No issues at all. I got home and got on my home network, and it dropped the internet connection!  (I had not read the posts about pings and resets, so I did not try those.)  Now I have rebooted at home and am on my VPN to see if that makes a difference.  Will keep you all posted.

       

    • #1914302 Reply

      bmeacham
      AskWoody Plus

      Update:

      Being on the VPN at home did not help.  I lost internet connectivity again.

      While internet connectivity was down, I was able to ping 127.0.0.1 and my router (192.168.1.1) successfully.

      I went into device manager and disabled and then re-enabled my ethernet adapter. Then I did the same for the wireless adapter.  Doing those things did not help; my internet connectivity was still down.

      I have rebooted and am on internet again, at least for a while. This is very perplexing. I am considering reinstalling Windows via Reset My PC or Fresh Start, but that is a very drastic step and I would rather not.

      Before I do that I will contact my ISP, Google Fiber, to see if they can help. Can y’all think of anything else I could try?

       

      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  bmeacham.
      • #1914349 Reply

        anonymous

        I have not seen this question asked yet: Have you tried a different Ethernet cable?

        • #1914942 Reply

          anonymous

          anonymous that is a good point. When we first started with ADSL, we had issues with it not working. Upon testing the cable, during the test one was flexing the cable and its connections, it then showed up as a intermittent loss.

      • #1914938 Reply

        anonymous

        bmeacham, anonymous #1911205 here. When I mentioned “disconnect/reconnect” I mean to go to the network connections shown (wireless), tell it to disconnect that connection. Not disable the card. The reconnect to the connection again as if you were switching wireless connections. As for the wired connection, I feel you did the best you can. Maybe unplug the wired connection, let windows see it has lost it, then re-plug it back in again. For us it is a wireless connection drop, and the “disconnect/reconnect” fixes it every time.

        JC Zorkoff, from what we have seen for the last 2 decades, many of the “one program does everything” is NOT a good idea. We have seen it proven, and used a “layered security” method of having 2, 3, or more programs that do a specific task (firewall only, antivirus only, antispyware only, email filtering only) to do a job. That tends to work. ALSO, when installing an antivirus I recommend one turn OFF every extra add-on or perk that AV has to offer. Everything I didn’t some program such as “web protection” had horribly slowed down the internet, or made videos not play hardly at all. Turning off that “web protection” made everything run normal again.

    • #1914358 Reply

      PaulK
      AskWoody Lounger

      Is this configurations recap correct?
      Your computer has both wired and wireless connectivity available.
      Your computer spontaneously drops internet, but not intranet. And this only when you are on the wired connection.
      Other intranet devices are only on wireless, and never have problems.

      Do you normally have both wired and wireless connections active?
      Does your computer automatically switch from wired to wireless when the wired connection is down?
      And back again from wireless to wired when [wired] reconnects?
      Paul T asked “Are you able to connect via wifi instead of ethernet?”

      Suggested tests:
      Have only one adapter – either wired OR wireless – active, and report results. {Disconnect ethernet cable; or turn off the wireless (may be a ‘F’-key or ‘Fn’-key, or a physical switch) }.

      (While keying this above, Anonymous slipped in with the suggestion to substitute another ethernet cable.)

      • #1914490 Reply

        mn–
        AskWoody Lounger

        Suggested tests:
        Have only one adapter – either wired OR wireless – active, and report results.

        Seconded.

        While modern versions of Windows attempt to be smart about this and make it work… it’ll possibly depend on your router not throwing a fit about it. Also once it happens, may take some time for the router’s… “security feature”… to calm down.

        Though if the problem only happens randomly…

        bmeacham, anonymous #1911205 here. PaulT has a good idea. When this happens can you ping your router? Do an IPCONFIG and get the address. When it happens see if you can reach the router via the PING command.

        Oh yes. If you happen to have two interfaces active and another working device in the local LAN, recommended you do all 4 of “ping -S <wired IP> <router IP>”, “ping -S <wifi IP> <router IP>”, “ping -S <wired IP> <other device IP>”, “ping -S <wifi IP> <other device IP>”.

    • #1914428 Reply

      joep517
      AskWoody MVP

      Have you tried resetting your network? Settings | Network & Internet | Status. Then “Network reset” in the right pane.

      --Joe

    • #1914933 Reply

      NightOwl
      AskWoody Plus

      @ bmeacham

      I am considering reinstalling Windows via Reset My PC or Fresh Start, but that is a very drastic step and I would rather not.

      Sort of the *nuclear* option!

      But here is an interesting clue. I was away at a hotel for a few days and had no problem at all while on the hotel’s wifi network!

      Well, that would seem to rule out a specific problem with any of your hardware or software when it interacts with an outside network and access to the internet. You could confirm those results by going to a coffee shop or wherever there’s wifi access and confirm that when on another network, you do not drop connectivity.

      Are there other computer users with different brands of computers using your network at the same time that you loose connectivity? If that has not been tried, you could have friends, family, or willing neighbors come over and help you run the test on your network.

      If the results are that everyone else remains connected without problems while you loose connectivity–then it surely is your hardware/software and its interaction with your home network.

      Can y’all think of anything else I could try?

      A. Do you have system image backups? How far back can you go? If you can estimate when you first had this problem–see if you have a system image that’s before then. If *yes*, make a current image so you can come back to where you are now, then restore the older image that you believe is before the problem occurred. Test to see if the problem is still present or if it is *resolved*. Go back further if the problem persists, and you have older still image backups to use.

      You could also look at Restore Points to see if they go back far enough. I once use a Restore Point to resolve a connection problem between my computer and router–the problem was on my computer side. Problem was resolved when I used the Restore Point that was before the problem began.

      B. You could disable and remove your current wired NIC and wifi adapter, and replace one or both with new ones. Install their drivers, and force your system to form a new relationship with the home network–test to see if the problem is resolved.

      (I don’t recall–did you test to determine if the loss of connectivity occurs on either the wired NIC or wifi adapter? So, for instance if you disconnect your ethernet cable from the wired NIC and force your system to use wifi, do you loose connectivity? And the other way around–disable the wifi adapter and possibly remove it and see if the connectivity is effected.

      C. I don’t recall–did you disable both the wired NIC and wifi in Device Manager, and then uninstall the drivers for each, and then re-install the drivers to see if that resets anything on the system to resolve the problem.

      You could also try installing an older driver, if available–for instance the *original* one that came with the wired NIC or wifi adapter–as opposed to any *newer* driver that you may have upgraded to.

      D. Let’s see–you’re on Win10. Doesn’t Win10 have a reputation for updating device drivers behind your back–forcing them on you? Did you see any evidence of that having happened?

      If you computer is a laptop–which I suspect it is if you took it to the hotel–there are USB devices for both wired NIC and wireless adapters to take the place of the built in ones. They can be fairly inexpensive. The built-in ones can be disabled by the BIOS and/or special keyboard combinations, or maybe just the Device Manager.

      NightOwl

      No question is stupid ... but, possibly the answers are 😉 !

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1915006 Reply

      bmeacham
      AskWoody Plus

      Other devices on my network stay connected.  Only my laptop loses connectivity.

      it surely is your hardware/software and its interaction with your home network.

      Yes, that seems to be the case.

      look at Restore Points to see if they go back far enough.

      I will try that.

      I have reset my network.  I have tried being on wireless only.  At the suggestion of my ISP, I gave my 2.4 GHz and 5 GHZ different names and connected to only one of them.  Still have the problem.   Next step is to be on wired ethernet only.  Will keep y’all posted.

    • #1915191 Reply

      Vincenzo
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’ll second Mr. Natural’s fix.  That has worked for me.

       

       

      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  Vincenzo.
    • #1915827 Reply

      bmeacham
      AskWoody Plus

      I am happy to say that my problem appears to be solved.  I have now been on the internet for hours with no interruptions. I want to thank NightOwl, who suggested this:

      You could also look at Restore Points to see if they go back far enough. I once use a Restore Point to resolve a connection problem between my computer and router–the problem was on my computer side. Problem was resolved when I used the Restore Point that was before the problem began.

      I found a restore point that was just before I updated a video device driver a week or so ago, restored to that point, and now my system is stable. I have no idea why a video device driver would interfere with my internet connection — and maybe the problem was actually something else that happened around that time — but at any rate, I am good now.

      Thanks to everyone who had suggestions and advice. It feels good to be a part of a community like this one.

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1916679 Reply

        CADesertRat
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks for posting back about resolution.  🙂

        Don't take yourself so seriously, no one else does 🙂
        4 Win 10 Pro currently 1809 (3 Desktops, 1 Laptop).

      • #1916976 Reply

        anonymous

        NightOwl Good one! Those work wonders IF you have a restore point -and- it does not say it was UNsuccessful.

        bmeacham, Glad to hear that. Could you please post the driver that you installed that caused this so others can be forewarned? I agree, what would a video driver have to do with it. But, many of the new video drivers are adding telemetry and this may be why a network card or connection is affected.

      • #1920158 Reply

        Are your Network adapters Nvidia & AMD CPU?  You might have had a bundled install on a graphics driver that tweaked your Network Adapter(s)?  Seems weird to me that a GPU driver would be root cause.  Glad it’s fixed though.  Consider disabling ipv6 on your machine’s adapter -esp. if you run a VPN w/ ipv4 & ipv6, to maybe prevent further complications.  Next time, Id also considering factory reset on my gateway/router and building that back from scratch.  (and like I mentioned earlier, 86 your ISP DNS if you haven’t already -those can bog you down, esp. if you live in a congested area).

    • #1916680 Reply

      NightOwl
      AskWoody Plus

      @ bmeacham

      I am happy to say that my problem appears to be solved.

      Good to hear! Thanks for reporting back on your success.

      Congrats on hanging in there, and working through the trouble shooting of the problem.

      NightOwl

      No question is stupid ... but, possibly the answers are 😉 !

    • #1932235 Reply

      bmeacham
      AskWoody Plus

      bmeacham, Glad to hear that. Could you please post the driver that you installed that caused this so others can be forewarned?

      Actually it was not the video driver.  It was something called Degoo that I installed shortly after updating the video driver. I had uninstalled Degoo, but apparently the uninstall was not complete. Restoring to a point before the video driver also restored to before Degoo installation. I later updated the video driver again and have had no problems. The driver was from Dell, updating my XPS 13 9343: Intel HD 4600 Graphics Driver updated 24 Jul 2019.

      btw, I do *not* recommend Degoo cloud storage. Terrible user interface and c***** client software.

      2 users thanked author for this post.

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