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  • macOS Catalina is here – but hold yer horses

    Home Forums AskWoody blog macOS Catalina is here – but hold yer horses

    This topic contains 20 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Alex5723 6 days, 17 hours ago.

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    • #1976779 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      From Nathan Parker: Apple released macOS Catalina today. The upgrade brings all new features to the Mac, including the ability to use an iPad as a sec
      [See the full post at: macOS Catalina is here – but hold yer horses]

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1976819 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Nathan: I Have QuickTime Player 7 and my macOS is Mojave. Is it OK to upgrade now to QT Player X or this is something that will only work with Catalina?  Also, assuming that it could be done right now, while Mojave is still the OS, is upgrading QuickTime from Player 7 to Player X known to create any problems with playing YouTube videos one has downloaded and stored in one’s Mac and that have been viewed until now with Player 7 without any problems?

      In a separate and earlier posting today (I was not sure if you were going to comment on this yet, because of the holiday) I made clear that it is a good idea (and why) to wait before upgrading to Catalina until at least the first important patch to this new OS version is released. A patch that, if the past is any guide, is likely to come out a few months after such an OS upgrade. Waiting for such a patch comes out is precisely what I intend to do before upgrading to Catalina. My question about Player X is also about whether this and the upgrade to Catalina are quite separate issues, or not.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

    • #1976821 Reply

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      At my workplace, Catalina is currently banned because our VPN software, centralized printing system and anti-malware are all currently incompatible.

      On a more positive note, macOS Catalina has the ability to integrate (indirectly) with Azure Active Directory for accounts & logins.  This could be a really big deal for organizations that have a lot of Windows PCs and Macs mixed in together.

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1976834 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Having found some reading material about Catalina and how it compares to previous versions of macOS, I have a bad feeling about this which I really hope is not justified. But I am not encouraged when reading what is written, for example, here:

      macOS Catalina: The MacStories Review

      The following excerpt, for example, sounds like an echo of what was said about how the unification of computing and communication technologies in one single cross-platform paradigm was finally started to be accomplished thanks to a new and bright idea: a great one-size-fits-all operating system called Windows 8!

      What’s just as clear about Catalina, though, is that the transformation of macOS isn’t about breaking up one app or bringing iPad apps to the Mac. Catalina is more about bringing the user experiences between the Mac and other Apple platforms together. It encompasses everything from aligning the features between apps that exist on each platform, to each system borrowing interaction models from the others, but adapted to respect the differences between them – whether that’s something like the ellipsis menu buttons added all over macOS or the context menus added to iOS and iPadOS 13. The cross-pollination of macOS with iOS and iPadOS isn’t complete, and it certainly isn’t consistent in places, but it is nonetheless important because it’s what will make the Mac fit better on Apple’s computing continuum. Catalina makes the Mac a more familiar and inviting environment for the millions of iOS and iPadOS users who have never used a Mac.

      “That’s a hard reality to face if you are a long-time user of the Mac for whom iOS and iPadOS are the newcomers, but in the final analysis, it’s simple math. In an increasingly mobile computing-based world, the Mac’s future lies in making it a platform that has something to offer iOS and iPadOS users, and makes moving from those platforms to the Mac simple.”

      Oh, Tim Cook: Say it ain’t so!

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

      • #1976854 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        After some more research I have found some more answers to the questions posed by myself previously here:

        (1) By looking into the Macintosh HD/Applications/QuickTime.app and right-clicking on the QT application icon, then choosing “Quick Look QuickTime.app” from the drop-down menu, this opened a pop-up box with the information that it is the version 10.5 of QuickTime Player that is already installed with Mojave in my Mac; the old QuickTime 7 was still listed there as well, but experimentally trashing it has not changed my ability to play mpeg-4 music videos. Since 10.5 is the 64-bit version supported by Catalina, it looks as if someone with Mojave moves on to Catalina, continuing to play the videos collected while running Mojave should not be a problem, for example those downloaded from YouTube. And I really have a lot of those.

        The other two 32-bit applications listed in Black Apple/About This Mac/System Report/Software/Applications are: InkServer, that can be used to draw pictures with a stylus (I think) and does not interest me, and something called quicklookd32, that I have no idea of what it does — but it is reassuringly listed right below plain quicklookd, that is 64-bit. Everything else there (and the list is really long) is 64-bit.

        (2) The article previously cited might have exaggerated the melding of the GUIs of Macs and gadgets such as iPhones or iPads into a Windows-8 type of user interface. The following article has what looks like a very comprehensive description of the new features in Catalina:

        https://appleinsider.com/articles/19/10/07/review-macos-catalina-1015-is-what-apple-promised-the-mac-could-be-and-is-a-crucial-upgrade

        And in there, the following paragraph seems to me somewhat reassuring:

        “The future, and present, on display:  Take a closer look at Catalina and you’ll realize that Apple clearly wants to preserve the unique platform features of “Mac-like” computing rather than trying to merge its platforms into an iOS-Mac hybrid. Apple’s Mac Human Interface Guidelines state four “primary themes” that differentiate macOS apps from iOS, tvOS, and watchOS apps: “flexible, expansive, capable, and focused.

        Hmmm…

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

    • #1976978 Reply

      Microfix
      Da Boss

      Adobe Photoshop v20.0.6 has issues with macOS 10.15 Catalina as per link.
      More info over at the Register

      ********** Win7 x64/x86 | Win8.1 x64 | Linux Hybrids x64 **********

    • #1977043 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      First wave of apps ported from iOS to macOS with Catalyst :

      macOS Catalina helps iPad apps come to the Mac, here are the first to launch

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1977046 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Apple’s Merged iPad, Mac Apps Leave Developers Uneasy, Users Paying Twice

      …Apple rolled out Catalyst, the technology to transition iPad apps into Mac versions, on Monday. It’s the initial step toward a bigger goal: By 2021, developers should be able to build an app once and have it work on iPhones, iPads and Mac computers through a single, unified App Store. But the first iteration, which appears to still be quite raw and in a number of ways frustrating to developers, risks upsetting users who may have to pay again when they download the Mac version of an iPad app they’ve already bought….

      https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-10-08/apple-s-merged-ipad-mac-apps-leave-developers-uneasy-users-paying-twice

    • #1977283 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      At the moment, having looked at Catalina in some more detail, I am wondering about skipping it altogether, as well as, perhaps, the next version of macOs, whatever its Californian name might be, if it turns out to be a similar non-event from my point of view, and only updating to a new version at the end of that one, when doing so shall become a must. Catalina does not seem to have anything new that I really need and don’t have already with Mojave, my Macs’ current (and fully supported) OS. But I’ll keep watching this and other spaces, to see what final decision to come to on this question.

      The only problem with doing this is that Apple, as it always does, shall keep bugging me with a daily notice of updating to Catalina. But I can live with that, by giving it, every time, the best answer available: “Remind me tomorrow”.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

    • #1977426 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Let me see if I can answer some questions, plus provide some additional information.

      In terms of QuickTime X, QuickTime X has been here since Snow Leopard (Mac OS X 10.6). It has added some of the features of QuickTime Pro to it (although I don’t know if it was ever 100% feature compatible.

      If you’re running macOS Mojave, you have the latest version of QuickTime X automatically. Nothing else to install/update. If there are any updates to QuickTime X, they’ll occur with macOS Catalina.

      QuickTime X should play most video files you’d need, especially if they’re common standards such as MP4 or MOV.

      https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201066

      The main reason people have kept QuickTime 7 around was for full QuickTime Pro functionality, or to play legacy QuickTime files (which most people don’t use anymore). Apple has long stopped supporting QuickTime 7.

      https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201175

      QuickTime X converts older formats to standards formats automatically when opening media now. I’ve used it to easily convert video footage to newer formats.

      https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202884

      If a video can’t be played by QuickTime X, this article may help.

      https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201290

      One good video players I’ve found that works well is Switch. VLC would also work.

      https://www.telestream.net/switch/overview.htm

      The Adobe issues are occurring with macOS Catalina. More info here:

      https://appleinsider.com/articles/19/10/08/minor-lightroom-and-photoshop-bugs-pop-up-in-macos-catalina

      My work VPN doesn’t support Catalina either. I’m about to test a version that may since it’s 64 Bit.

      Eventually, you’ll likely want to upgrade to Catalina since the new features are nice, plus Apple improves security and privacy with every major update. It is a good idea to wait until at least 10.15.1 though, and to ensure all your apps are 64 Bit first.

      For those who take the plunge early, here’s also a good article on Sidecar:

      https://appleinsider.com/articles/19/10/08/how-to-use-sidecar-in-macos-catalina-with-your-ipad-and-your-mac

      Here’s also an article about another issue with the iTunes Store for iPhone and iPad users. Not sure if anyone is having this:

      https://www.macrumors.com/2019/10/08/itunes-store-is-unable-to-process-purchases-error/

      On Project Catalyst apps, I’m glad to see more apps come to the Mac. The re-purchase for each platform is an annoyance, but I do this a lot now, so I could live with it. I just hope more subscriptions don’t explode. I have enough subscriptions now. 🙂

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1977444 Reply

      anonymous

      Turns out upgrading to Catalina is a total battlefield, many machines ended hanging on configuring your mac, the final step before booting to the desktop. Only solution so far seems to pull the plug and reset the smc. Looks like Apple also fell for commercial interests instead of a stable rollout. Don’t understand why there always MUST be a huge upgrade every year again, for any OS.

      • #1977451 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Anonymous #1977444  : “Don’t understand why there always MUST be a huge upgrade every year again, for any OS.

        There is one every year, pretty much, but one can hang fire on it and stay with the same version of macOS for three consecutive annual updates (counting the one of the current OS in the Mac), before the installed version’s EOL makes it necessary to move on to a new version — and even then not necessarily to the latest one. Also, except in the situation just described, one is able to investigate what is offered in the latest version Apple comes up with and then make up one’s mind as to whether there is enough in it, that one really needs, to make it worth upgrading to this latest version, or not.

        And, as already pointed out repeatedly here, it is best to wait for at least one or two months, until one or two major updates to the new OS version have been issued, before installing it, assuming that installing it is what one finally decides to do.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

    • #1977478 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Right now, it is certainly not safe to upgrade to Catalina. There are always going to be bugs with each major macOS release. It is always good to wait until at least the “.1” update (think “Service Pack 1” for macOS upgrades). Sometimes it’s even advisable to wait a little longer.

      I’m not a huge fan of the annual release cadence. I would prefer every two or three years to take more time to work on the features, then release them. The only thing I dislike more is Windows 10 releasing two major releases per year (which is one thing that drove me back to a Mac). I generally recommend keeping macOS current at least by the end of each year to ensure one has latest the security/privacy patches (even though previous releases get some security patches as well), and the new features are generally useful enough to upgrade (especially now that upgrades are free, I used to spend $129-199 per upgrade!).

      I’m not a huge fan of the “rapid rolling release” cycle, but it seems this is what the world has jumped onto, and we’re stuck with it. Instead of the good old days where we paid for our operating system upgrades every few years, installed them with a DVD, and “generally” had stable OS releases, the world has decided to make the operating system a “service” with frequent updates. Not something I enjoy, but I’m stuck with it no matter what OS I choose, and I just have to embrace it. When I want a break from it, I can always pull out my PowerBook G4 running Mac OS X Leopard and take a stroll down memory lane.

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1977490 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Nathan, I understand that every new macOS release is big and measured in GB, because it is that of a whole OS, whether the differences between, let’s say, for argument’s sake, Mojave and Catalina, are small or large, it is a whole OS what is released, not a patch to the older one.

      Now, when it comes to incremental updates (from, e.g. 10.15.1. to 10.15.2) the size of those is (that I have seen son far) also very large. This fact gives me the impression that, instead of a bunch of perhaps small patches to be integrated by an installer application into their target macOS, it is the whole macOS with those patches already installed on it what is delivered. Is that right?

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1977513 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Adobe Photoshop v20.0.6 has issues with macOS 10.15 Catalina as per link.
      More info over at the Register

      Minor Lightroom and Photoshop bugs pop up in macOS Catalina

      Those who use Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop may have run into a few minor bugs after upgrading to Catalina, but most have fairly simple workarounds.

      https://appleinsider.com/articles/19/10/08/minor-lightroom-and-photoshop-bugs-pop-up-in-macos-catalina

    • #1977514 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      How to use Sidecar in macOS Catalina with your iPad and your Mac

      https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/213218/

    • #1977993 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Now, when it comes to incremental updates (from, e.g. 10.15.1. to 10.15.2) the size of those is (that I have seen son far) also very large. This fact gives me the impression that, instead of a bunch of perhaps small patches to be integrated by an installer application into their target macOS, it is the whole macOS with those patches already installed on it what is delivered. Is that right?

      I don’t think “minor” updates deliver the whole OS like major upgrades do, but what happens is Apple generally rolls a bunch of stuff together in fewer updates, hence the larger size.

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1977996 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Some additional Catalina-related news:

      Nathan Parker

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1978019 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Nathan,

      Thanks for this summary of Catalina’s new features in “MacRumors.”

      I am taking the list of titles in “Catalina’s Biggest Changes” sub-link and writing it here with some short comments as to what I make of them and my need for some of these Changes:

      No More iTunes                                     —   OK, except that the various things it did are                                                                   now scattered among different pieces of software.
      Finder Syncing                                              —   I don’t synchronize content between devices.
      Apple Watch Password Authentication    —  No Apple Watch, so no Watch password.
      Sidecar                                                             — No iPad, so no iPad apps.
      iPad  Apps for Mac                                —  See comment on “Sidecar.”
      Find My                                                   —  Nice of Apple to help one find friends,  ………………………………………………………but I think I can manage. Thanks!
      No More 32-Bit Apps                            — All my applications are now 64 bit                                                                        except for a thing to draw or sign using                                                                          a stylus, something I can manage without.

      Also, from the comments of the MacRumors’ members posted in that section, they are not very enthusiastic about this new version of macOS: “Meh”, “Underwhelming”, “No way I am going to install this”…

      I have been thinking about taking a vacation from updating my three different OS (security-related patches excepted), soon to include Windows 7 permanently — and not too soon for my taste, after all the patching drama of recent times still playing to full houses. (But now it is mostly about Windows 10, so that’s OK ; )

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by  OscarCP.
    • #1978548 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I just started up my Mac (running “Mojave”) and got immediately a warning that my AV (Webroot SecureAnywhere, that I have kept always up to date) was incompatible with “Catalina”. I clicked the button for “Further Information” and got transported to a Webroot page informing the readers that a new version of the AV is being made ready, “working closely with Apple”. Also that “Catalina” will disable the AV and issue a series of endless warnings to annoy the unprotected users. But there is also a workaround outlined in that Webroot page. If you are using this AV, even if you still have “Mojave”, or earlier, installed and have yet to move on to “Catalina”, then all you need to do is just wait (as repeatedly advised here) at the very least until Webroot gives the “all clear”. And, preferably, until the second incremental update to “Catalina”, maybe two month’s from now. Also, there seems to be nothing in “Catalina” that requires an immediate update to be able to use it right now. (Have a look to previous postings here, and also at the title of this thread.)

       

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

    • #1980020 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      Mail Data Loss in macOS 10.15

      ..I’ve heard a bunch of reports of data loss in Apple Mail…

      What I’m hearing:

      Updating Mail’s data store from Mojave to Catalina sometimes says that it succeeded, but large numbers of messages turn out to be missing or incomplete.

      Mail Data Loss in macOS 10.15

      [Moderator edit] please only post a precis with a link to the original, otherwise it’s copyright infringement.

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    Reply To: macOS Catalina is here – but hold yer horses

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