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  • Macrium versions

    Home Forums Tools Macrium versions

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    • This topic has 17 replies, 7 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago.
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      • #2348726
        Harvey Levitt
        AskWoody Plus

        Susan Bradley has been recommending Macrium for some time now. My subscription to Acronis just expired and I have not been happy with their recent updates so I am ready to give it a try. I noted that there is only a $5 difference between the cost of the Home version and the Workstation version. I am curious as to whether there are benefits to spending the additional $5. Please advise. Thanks.

      • #2348735
        Moonshine
        AskWoody Lounger

        The Free version of MF is often suitable for many folks.
        Have a look at the link below to see a version comparison table to assess your needs:

        https://www.macrium.com/reflectfree

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2348741
        JohnW
        AskWoody Lounger

        I had been happy with the free version of Macrium reflect for years. But then I decided to upgrade to the Home version just to support them, and not because I needed it.

      • #2348996
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        What exactly do you want from your backup program?
        Where do you store your backups? HDD, cloud etc?

        We suggest several free / paid apps, with Macrium being at the lower end in user friendliness.

        If you do change you will need to keep a copy of ATI to access old backups. You can do this with a recovery USB to boot the PC.

        cheers, Paul

      • #2349115
        WSthesquire
        AskWoody Plus

        I have been using macrium reflect for several years.  I regularly do image backups intended for restorqtion of a crashed and unrecoverable boot drive or other drive, including external backup drives.  I need to know whether or not a Rescue ‘Disk’ (USB version) made with an older version of Macrium can be successfully used to restore an image backup made with a newer version with the same basic version number – ie., Rescue disk made using Ver. 7.4 something, but the image created with Ver. 7.5 something or later.  In other words, is it necessary to keep making USB Rescue ‘disks’ every time the developer issues an update or minor revision?    Of course the same question applies to older Rescue ‘Disks’ and newer versions, ie., Rescue “Disk ver 7.4 something, backup made with Version 8 (for example).

        • #2349129
          JohnW
          AskWoody Lounger

          The Macrium release notes usually suggest when something has just been changed that makes a new rescue build recommended, but it’s normally not necessary.

          If you are using the PE version, Macrium tends to keep using a stable version that doesn’t often change. If you have made major changes or upgrades to your PC, you may want to update the rescue to ensure it has included any new drivers that you may need. I see that my rescue is currently at Windows PE 10 Release 1709 (64-bit). Which has nothing at all to do with my installed OS, which is Windows 10 Pro 2004.

          That said, I personally keep the rescue reasonably updated once or twice a year as a precaution, just not with every minor Reflect update. Because every time you update the rescue, you do need to do a test boot with it to make sure it works!

      • #2349133
        Susan Bradley
        Manager

        I recommend paid because of the anti-ransomware features. It sets up the backup with a separate user account so that the attackers can’t gain access to your backup. The free version doesn’t have that.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2349136
        JohnW
        AskWoody Lounger

        I recommend paid because of the anti-ransomware features. It sets up the backup with a separate user account so that the attackers can’t gain access to your backup. The free version doesn’t have that.

        Good idea!

        My primary external USB drive is Bitlockered and stays attached 24/7 for my daily images.

        So I have always used a method where I keep a 2nd external USB drive offline under lock and key, that I only connect weekly for an hour or so to do a weekly scheduled full image. But It would be a lousy deal if that provided some ransomware the opportunity to attack it! Ugh!

        I upgraded to Home edition last year when it was on sale. Time to go make sure that anti-ransomware is enabled!

        Edit: I checked Macrium Image Guardian, and it was off by default. So I turned it on, and selected the connected backup drive to protect.

        Macrium Image Guardian protects your backup files from unauthorized modification.

        Only Macrium Reflect v7.1 and later products and tools are granted access to write to .mrimg, .mrbak, .mrsql, and .mrex files.

         

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by JohnW. Reason: Follow-up with Macrium Image Guardian details
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2349160
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        My primary external USB drive is Bitlockered

        So how do you restore from Bitlockered image in case of crash ?

      • #2349165
        Moonshine
        AskWoody Lounger

        Fortunately, they thought of scenarios like that:

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2349180
        JohnW
        AskWoody Lounger

        My primary external USB drive is Bitlockered

        So how do you restore from Bitlockered image in case of crash ?

        What Moonshine said.

        I keep my Windows OS C: drive fully BitLockered, and my external USB drive for daily images has BitLocker-to-go enabled. So I am protected in case of physical theft. The drives will essentially be bricks to anybody else who makes off with them, although they could wipe and re-deploy them.

        When Windows boots up, it automatically unlocks these drives for use while the OS is running, after I enter the passcode at pre-boot. Remove the drives, or power down the PC and they are locked.

        The Macrium Rescue media with BitLocker enabled has these BitLocker keys embedded so that when booting from the Rescue, it automatically unlocks these drives. Since I chose this option, I must keep the Rescue media secured, as it contains the keys to the kingdom.

        Instead of placing the keys on the Macrium Rescue media, you can optionally use the Windows command line “manage-bde” to unlock BitLocker drives from a WinPE rescue environment. But I tried it and found it was a pain in the rear to use. https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/administration/windows-commands/manage-bde

      • #2349283
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        how do you restore from Bitlockered image in case of crash

        If you have an image backup you can restore the image to a new disk and then add Bitlocker / Veracrypt.

        cheers, Paul

      • #2349314
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        how do you restore from Bitlockered image in case of crash

        If you have an image backup you can restore the image to a new disk and then add Bitlocker / Veracrypt.

        cheers, Paul

        If the image is encrypted with Bitlocker don’t you need to ‘unlock’ with password before restoring ?
        Does any image restore app present a ‘enter password’ for encrypted image ?

      • #2349347
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        A backup made from within Windows is not encrypted and can be restored as usual, although individually encrypted files / folders may be a different matter.

        Backing up without first unlocking the disk will result is a backup of the encrypted data, but only if the encryption is done in software (Windows). If the encryption is done by the hard disk hardware then you probably can’t even access the disk without unlocking.

        cheers, Paul

      • #2349355
        Moonshine
        AskWoody Lounger

        Adding BitLocker support to Windows PE

        . . . . It isn’t absolutely necessary to unlock a BitLocker encrypted drive when restoring an image of the encrypted partition. The partition will restore without a problem and will be automatically re-encrypted on reboot, however, unlocking the drive in Windows PE enables intelligent sector copy imaging and cloning, RapidDelta Restore (RDR) and also free access to the drives contents using PE Explorer. . . .

        https://blog.macrium.com/techie-tuesday-adding-bitlocker-support-to-windows-pe-cae3369e89b1

        Other useful links:

        How to prepare for an IT disaster with Macrium Rescue Media

        https://blog.macrium.com/how-to-prepare-for-an-it-disaster-with-macrium-rescue-media-ca7dfcd3ebc6

        What are the differences between WinRE and WinPE? And which one should I use?

        https://blog.macrium.com/what-are-the-differences-between-winre-and-winpe-and-which-one-should-i-use-63175331f15

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Moonshine.
        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2349358
        JohnW
        AskWoody Lounger

        how do you restore from Bitlockered image in case of crash

        If you have an image backup you can restore the image to a new disk and then add Bitlocker / Veracrypt.

        cheers, Paul

        If the image is encrypted with Bitlocker don’t you need to ‘unlock’ with password before restoring ?
        Does any image restore app present a ‘enter password’ for encrypted image ?

        When I am running Windows and Macrium creates an image to my Bitlocker-to-go external drive, that image is encrypted on that drive just the same as all the other contents on that BitLockered drive.

        I can restore that image to any drive by first unlocking that drive that contains the image.

        I can restore that image to the encrypted system drive by unlocking the system drive.

        Fortunately, the Macrium rescue medium can automatically unlock both drives for me if I wish.

        Alternatively, if I take an image of a BitLockered system drive to an unencrypted drive, that image will be in the clear, and must be kept in a secure location. I make a weekly image in that way, as a backup.

        The way disk encryption works is that the once a disk is “unlocked”, the OS sees it as unencrypted data (it’s actually unencrypted “on-the-fly” based on the keys), so anyone with access to that machine can access the disk data normally, but any data sent from that machine is unencrypted.

      • #2349362
        JohnW
        AskWoody Lounger

        A backup made from within Windows is not encrypted and can be restored as usual, although individually encrypted files / folders may be a different matter.

        You can make a live backup image from within Windows to an encrypted target that is “unlocked” to Windows at the time the image is taken. I do this every day.

        Once that target drive is “locked” again, as it is automatically when it is removed or Windows is shutdown, the image is encrypted in that “locked” drive.

      • #2349374
        JohnW
        AskWoody Lounger

        Backing up without first unlocking the disk will result is a backup of the encrypted data, but only if the encryption is done in software (Windows). If the encryption is done by the hard disk hardware then you probably can’t even access the disk without unlocking.

        The only way to back up without first unlocking the disk is by doing an “offline” image by booting the system from an alternate boot source, other than the installed copy of Windows. So if you are backing up from within a running BitLockered Windows system, the OS drive had to be first unlocked at boot.

        Regarding disk hardware encryption, there was a security vulnerability note issued from CERT Coordination Center. Apparently many, but not all, vendors were affected. I’m sticking to software encryption only, even though my OS drive supports SED. There are Group Policy Settings for BitLocker to manage this. https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/security/information-protection/bitlocker/bitlocker-group-policy-settings#bkmk-hdeosd

        Microsoft advisory to enforce software encryption: https://msrc.microsoft.com/update-guide/en-us/vulnerability/ADV180028

        Self-encrypting hard drives do not adequately protect data
        Vulnerability Note VU#395981 https://www.kb.cert.org/vuls/id/395981/

        There are multiple vulnerabilities in implementations of ATA Security or TCG Opal Standards in Self-Encrypting Disks (SEDs), which can allow an attacker to decrypt contents of an encrypted drive.

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