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  • Malwarebytes for Linux?

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      • #2273431
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        I use the free version of Malwarebytes to scan my Windows 7 PC and my Mac right after running my AV (Webroot SecureAnywhere). According to this Web page, Malwarebytes is also available for servers running Linux (of which there are many around the world.) But not for Linux users with PCs or workstations:

        https://www.malwarebytes.com/business/ep-server-security/

        Malwarebytes offers mix-and-match capabilities to ensure that all of your organizational needs are met. This includes protection for Windows and Linux servers, as well as Windows and Mac endpoints.

        Any idea if there is already a Linux version of Malwarebytes for common users undergoing a sustained development effort?

        Or any suggestions for good Linux-compatible alternatives to Malwarebytes?

         

        Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Mojave & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with16 GB RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. Webroot SA AV and Malwarebytes.

      • #2273444
        anonymous
        Guest

        Any idea if there is already a Linux version of Malwarebytes for common users

        “Any idea if there is a Linux version of [preferred Windows AV]?” is a frequently-asked question… and the commonly-heard answer is usually something like “No, probably not, and there are reasons for that.” But yes, as has been previously discussed here on AskWoody, options do exist for those determined to run AV on a linux box. See the following threads for more info, including info re specific options:

        Does Linux need Antivirus?

        Linux : Needs to have anti-virus program? If so, what would be the best program?

        Is Clamav worth it vs. system requirements?

        Hope this helps.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2273451
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Thank you, Anonymous. Yours is a good answer to my second question.

          Looking forward to other helpful answers like this one to my second question, and also to some to my first question (which see above, in the first entry to this thread.)

          Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Mojave & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

          MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with16 GB RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
          Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
          Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. Webroot SA AV and Malwarebytes.

          • #2273466
            anonymous
            Guest

            You’re welcome, OscarCP.

            Yep, me again (same anon as above). And I noticed from your post that you’re running Mint, which – as I’m sure you know – is based on/downstream from Ubuntu, so thought perhaps you might also find the following link useful…

            https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Antivirus

            Hope this helps too.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2273504
        Bill C.
        AskWoody Plus

        If you are using Firefox on Linux, you can use the Malwarebytes Browser Guard extension.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2273647
          firemind
          AskWoody Lounger

          Firefox moved to a “Recommended Extensions” system to help users to avoid bad apps and I have been sticking to extensions that are listed. Unfortunately “Malwarebytes Browser Guard” hasn’t been added yet.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2273651
        firemind
        AskWoody Lounger

        I haven’t seen a good Malwarebytes equivalent for Linux Mint yet. I am using Linux Mint 19.3 and use the Flatpak version of Clamtk. Clamtk can search for viruses and PUPs/PUAs but I turned the latter off due to false positives with LibreOffice files.

        The Flatpak version doesn’t support autoupdates or scheduled scans but I manually update regularly and scan regularly. I also update and scan before I install any application/update.

        Sometimes I will scan different folders but usually stick to scanning the /home folder. /Home holds the Flatpak and Snap files installed, Windows programs installed via Wine, and the Downloads folder – so a scan there covers almost all of the venues for viruses.

        Another thing I learned is that permissions also effect Clamtk so unless you you run as root you can’t scan some folders. But then again a virus would probably have to have root access to infect those areas. (Yay for passwords!).

        It would be nice to have a Linux version of Malwarebytes but we can survive without it.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2273681
        Bill C.
        AskWoody Plus

        Firefox moved to a “Recommended Extensions” system to help users to avoid bad apps and I have been sticking to extensions that are listed. Unfortunately “Malwarebytes Browser Guard” hasn’t been added yet.

        When I moved my Firefox Profile from my Windows 7Pro-64 Machine to my new Linux Mint 19.3 Cinnamon home built desktop, all the extensions were on the Linux Firefox transferred. I later manually added it to my wife’s Linux Mint 18.3 Mate Firefox using the extensions search setting.

        Between Adblocker Ultimate, HTTPS Everywhere, Malwarebytes Browserguard, Facebook Container and Google Analytics blocker, my browsing is much faster and even my Gmail is ad free.

        I search for extensions based upon what I read here on these forums and other privacy/security sites I read, not on what Mozilla decides to recommend. BrowserGuard is good for blocking access to sites with troublesome scam spam, or data harvesting, histories or domains, and especially for links attempting to re-direct you another site. You can bypass the warnings if you want, but it is your choice.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
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