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  • Manjaro discussion continued…

    Posted on Microfix Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    This topic contains 41 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Microfix 1 week, 3 days ago.

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    • #199010 Reply

      anonymous

      I started looking into Linux about 5 years ago now, shortly after experiencing Win8 and imagining where it was heading.
      2 years ago (after 3 years of testing) I was able to migrate to Linux and friends/family came along.
      A few months ago the majority of us moved to Manjaro (a couple to Pop! OS).
      They’ve had 2 years’ Linux experience now and are capable of sharing/helping friends.
      I write install guides for them to follow and all goes well, rarely any issues at all for 2 years.
      Linux isn’t for everyone, those that can use the Linux equivalents like gimp, kolourpaint, openshot, simple scan, scribus, writer etc, get on quite well. Those that can’t will have a tough time of it.
      Macs are another option if they can afford the entry price.
      greynad

      Edit: Move to appropriate section.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #199023 Reply

        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        Interest in Manjaro seems to have taken a big leap, overtaking Linux Mint according to DistroWatch page ranking. Haven’t tried Manjaro yet and seems to have lots of different editions.

        Even has a base XFCE iso edition, minimal install for older PC’s so the user can pick their apps, way to go Manjaro! That’s the way to do it, forget all the bloat, uninstalling etc and let the end-user choose. May be worth a visit/ download/VM install once the 18.04LTS edition is released.

        See DistroWatch link above for more info..

        Something of worth perhaps,

        Does conforming to GDPR affect new European Linux distro’s from release? I would have thought so but, may be something to ponder whether in Europe or not 😉

        | 2x Group A- W8.1 | Group A+ Linux Hybrid | Group W W7 Pro | Group W XP Pro
          No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #199027 Reply

          JohnW
          AskWoody Lounger

          Thanks for that info.  I see that Manjaro has been in the number 1 spot for the past 6 months.

          So I ask why?  That is actually just the page hits per IP address per day, not the actual count of installed distros.  https://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=popularity

          Digging in deeper, I read a few reviews to see what’s up.  Never paid Manjaro much attention before due to it being an Arch Linux based distro.  Nothing against Arch, but that is one branch of the Linux tree that I have avoided due to it’s deep geek status.  I have never had the urge to compile my own Linux distro from source code, and I always had the impression that Arch attracts mostly users who do.

          So I ran across this Manjaro review by a frequent reviewer of all things Linux by the name of Dedoimedo.  https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/manjaro-17-1-6-hakoila-plasma.html

          This was a review of a recent KDE Plasma based install of Manjaro, and he generally likes it, with a few niggles.  But the big surprise was that it comes straight out of the box with two things that Windows users might want.  Steam and Microsoft Office Online.

          Yes that’s right!  Microsoft Office Online icons in your start menu, or on your desktop.

          “And they come up as proper applications, too. Well, isolated single-page Webkit applications, but applications nonetheless. And you can pin them to the task manager and everything. Blimey awesome! … Proper stuff. You launch the apps, you sign in online, and there you have. You have your Microsoft Office Online, and even Skype.”

          5 users thanked author for this post.
          • #199067 Reply

            Microfix
            AskWoody MVP

            @johnw This does need further investigation especially for the MS Office on-line as you have pointed out.

            Have used mostly Debian/ Ubuntu derivatives currently and in the past 6-7 years, a challenge awaits when 18.04 version is available.

            | 2x Group A- W8.1 | Group A+ Linux Hybrid | Group W W7 Pro | Group W XP Pro
              No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
            1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #199088 Reply

          JohnW
          AskWoody Lounger

          I think an attractive alternative to Manjaro may be the Kubuntu KDE Plasma flavor of the Ubuntu distro.  https://kubuntu.org/

          I tried a bootable live version of Kubuntu recently, with KDE Plasma, and it was a smooth ride.  The desktop appears to be very similar to the KDE Plasma used by Manjaro.  Very stable and it detected all of my hardware out of the box.

          I think a possible advantage with Kubuntu over Manjaro, is that it is based on the same repositories used by Debian/Ubuntu.

          1. So that could mean better familiarity under the hood for those that have already used Debian/Ubuntu/Mint, etc.  A bit less techy than Arch, or at least more ease of use for casual or new Linux users.

          2. The extensive amount of user help online for Ubuntu makes it easy to solve most issues with using a Debian/Ubuntu/Mint flavored distro.

          https://ubuntuforums.org/

          https://askubuntu.com/

          Final thought about KDE Plasma.  I think it now may be the most polished looking desktop of any available today. Probably the most “Windows-like”.  https://www.kde.org/plasma-desktop

          https://userbase.kde.org/Plasma

          I installed a Kubuntu release a few years ago, and even tried it as my daily driver for awhile.  But it was a bit buggy, and KDE Plasma seemed barely out of beta at the time.  So I replaced that with Mint Cinnamon.  A good decision!

          But I may have to take another look at these newer KDE Plasma distros, starting with Manjaro and Kubuntu.  A far cry from the cartoonish looking KDE from a decade ago!

          4 users thanked author for this post.
          • #199211 Reply

            Ascaris
            AskWoody MVP

            FWIW, I tried Kubuntu 18.04 recently on a couple of different PCs, and I ended up going back to Mint with Cinnamon.  Mint with Cinnamon is boring in its reliability… it just works, day in and day out.  With Kubuntu, I had lots of crashes of various sub-components… every few hours, pretty much, something or other was crashing, and they were all different issues.  I expect it will smooth out over time, but on the very same PC, Mint worked without any issues at all.  I ran Mint 18.0 when it came out, and it wasn’t crashy like Kubuntu 18.04 is now.

            This isn’t the first time I had that experience with Kubuntu vs. Mint.  It happened once before, in 2015 (that time with Mint KDE).  Kubuntu 15.10 crashed within a few minutes of starting every time I used it back then, and would lock up to the point that I had to reset the PC (before I knew about other ways of regaining control of Linux during a system hang).  I tried Mint KDE 17.2, and it was flawless.

            Kubuntu, like all of the Ubuntu 18.04 versions, no longer offers ecryptfs encryption of the user’s home directory.  I read that ecryptfs isn’t being maintained/updated as well as it once was, and it doesn’t work properly with some of the changes in 18.04. While Ubuntu has a replacement for ecryptfs in the works, it’s not ready yet.

            I like the convenience of the ecryptfs system, warts and all; in Mint 18.3, it works quite well for me.

            Those issues should be taken care of in time.  It feels like Ubuntu 18.04 wasn’t really quite ready yet, IMO.  Such is the peril of releasing based on the calendar rather than on the state of readiness of any given version… like Windows, Ubuntu releases are numbered by release date, where 18.04 means April 2018.  Linux Mint release numbers don’t relate to any date in particular, so there’s no pressure to hurry up and get it out the door before it’s not April anymore.  MS had that happen with 1803, which was actually released in April.  It’s embarrassing to the company, and makes them look like they’re not in control.  I much prefer the “we will release it when it’s ready” model.

            Further, with Kubuntu, you run into the issue of the KDE devs having decided for you that you really don’t want to run your text editor (Kate, in Kubuntu) or the file manager (Dolphin) as root.  Well, you may want to, but you don’t get to, because they’ve decided it’s bad, so you can’t.  They are working on changes that will allow you to elevate privileges as needed without running as root (Kate will allow you to edit a system file as non-root, but it will ask you to elevate if you want to save it in a directory owned by root.  Dolphin is still a work in progress), which will be really convenient, but they’re not ready yet.  Given that the Linux world has been elevating the privileges of the file manager and the text editor for so many years, and that all of the other desktops besides KDE will keep doing it in the same way, I can’t imagine what is suddenly so important to stop this right now before the replacement for running Dolphin as root is even ready.

            That’s the kind of unilateral “we know best, so we’re imposing this on everyone” attitude I loathe about Microsoft and Google, and I don’t like it any more coming from open source.  GNOME is prone to the same fits of “we know best,” but Mint strips a lot of that out.  Some of it still filters down, like GNOME’s insistence on having the Ok and Cancel (or Save and Cancel, or what have you) buttons reversed (which you are probably used to if you use Android, as it has them reversed too, or at least it did the last time I used it).  They’ve decided it makes more sense that way, so the rest of the world can just deal with it (and those of us who use Windows and Linux can curse one side or the other for breaking “muscle” memory).

            KDE has the buttons in the right order, but that, paradoxically, is worse (IMO) than having it all backwards (as in any GNOME-based desktop environment, which is almost all of them that are not KDE).  Any KDE or Qt program will have the buttons in the normal order, as in Windows, but any GNOME program will still have them reversed– so you have a mixture of both, given how ubiquitous GNOME and programs using GTK+ (Firefox, for one) are in the Linux world.  I rarely run into the opposite, as Qt programs under GNOME-based desktops are a lot less common.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #199037 Reply

      Microfix
      AskWoody MVP

      Good info being gathered on Manjaro Linux which seemed appropriate to start a new thread on the subject as a continuation from the original:

      | 2x Group A- W8.1 | Group A+ Linux Hybrid | Group W W7 Pro | Group W XP Pro
        No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #199107 Reply

      Microfix
      AskWoody MVP

      Yup, tried KDE a few years ago on a learning curve, nice looking branch distro but found it used more system resources than the likes of xfce or lxde which I opted for later. Wasn’t too bothered on OS aesthetics as my aim, at the time, was to reduce resources so I could utilize the maximum performance at a minimum cost of resources, ideal for VM’s in an Oracle VM box. Over the years have modified and settled on an lxde hybrid distro Peppermint OS and always seemed to go back to it having tried many on VM’s and hardware SSD’s.

      Just to show how aesthetics can be changed, below is a before and after of the same panel modification of my current desktop layout:

      Before (default)

      pm8-settings-panel-1

      After

      OS-Desktop

      | 2x Group A- W8.1 | Group A+ Linux Hybrid | Group W W7 Pro | Group W XP Pro
        No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  Microfix.
      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  Microfix. Reason: png to jpg reduction
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      • #199118 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Lounger

        The “after” looks curiously a lot like a Mac desktop: red, yellow green buttons on top left corner for sizing and closing window, format of the task bar at bottom and several of the icons themselves: Finder and Apps Store, for example. I wonder why all those attack lawyers Apple keeps just hungry enough in its kennels are not jumping on this already. If memory serves, Apple once sued some software company for making a GUI with screen windows with the same shape as theirs.

         

        • #199121 Reply

          Microfix
          AskWoody MVP

          Freely available downloadable icon sets, settings within linux, editing xml scripts, my graphics, you can do almost anything you want with it. There are loads of OS related downloads online as packages 🙂

          | 2x Group A- W8.1 | Group A+ Linux Hybrid | Group W W7 Pro | Group W XP Pro
            No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
          2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #199212 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody MVP

        KDE is much lighter now than it used to be.  They’ve really done a great job with that.  I don’t remember specifics, but it was on par with Cinnamon the last time I checked.

    • #199117 Reply

      JohnW
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’m not sure every discussion about Linux needs to be about how to run it on old hardware.  Of course that is a very important topic, but it puts artificial boundaries on looking objectively at all that Linux may have to offer today.  Just keeping an open mind and approaching from all perspectives here.  😉

      On the other hand what if we looked at the way some folks do about building a PC to run games at the fastest possible FPS at the highest possible resolution?

      Maybe some users have a budget to buy or build a new PC, but just want nothing further to do with Windows?  Enter Linux!  On relatively recent hardware with decent specs, the impact of the fattest distros on resources shouldn’t affect performance.  This is where aesthetics and features can take top priority.

      A few years ago I custom built a new PC for a dedicated Linux box.  I needed a host to run a few VMs for a computer science class that I was taking.  So I built an Intel Core i3 3.4 GHz, 8GB RAM system that could run anything well.  I used that as my daily driver for a couple of years, with various distros.

      Then I built another PC with the same motherboard and CPU to run Windows 7 Pro, and eventually upgraded it to Windows 10 Pro.  It is still solid, and a good performer (especially since adding SSD) for anything that I throw at it.

      I have also used several “light” distros as VMs, and eventually settled on Xubuntu (Xfce), as my favorite distro to use as VM to run on my laptop that only has 4GB RAM.  That gets a bit tight, alongside a Windows host.  So I do get that perspective completely.

      It’s just that it takes a bit of extra effort, and research, to squeeze a modern full featured distro into a resource constrained package.

      Why not run Linux on a maxed out hardware config instead? Options!  🙂

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #199120 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Lounger

        Good point related to an interesting fact: there are Linux versions for the “Amiga”, for servers like those used in huge server farms, for supercomputers… A pretty versatile little thing, isn’t it? With all those close blood-relations, some also for multiple platforms, such as Android, Chrome/Chromium, macOS (known earlier as OS X), FreeBSD…

         

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  OscarCP.
      • #199213 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody MVP

        I use Linux Mint 18.3 on my desktop.  It’s not maxed out nor the most modern system in the world, but it’s pretty good.  It’s a Sandy Bridge i5-2500k overclocked to 4.5GHz at the moment (I may go higher once again as I had in the past, but 4.5 is plenty for my needs; I seldom see full utilization as it is), 16GB of DDR3-2333 RAM, a GTX 760 2GB (getting a little old, but still a workhorse), with 2 SSDs and a 3 TB HD (one SSD each for Windows and Linux; the HDD is shared data between them).

        I also had Linux (Kubuntu 18.04) on a Dell gaming laptop that I ended up restoring to Windows 10 and returning as described in another message (titled something like “Musings on modern laptop design” in rants).  That one was a Kaby i5 (quad core, since that’s not always true in mobile i5s), 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD, GTX 1050ti with Optimus.  After some initial stumbles in Kubuntu, I got it working really nicely.  Windows 8.1 wasn’t so easy , and I was not quite ready to go all-in on Linux gaming just yet, and Windows 10… pfft, that’s out of the question.  No 8.1, no good.  I got a great deal on it, and it was really a nice computer in most ways, so that return was a little painful.

    • #199143 Reply

      MrJimPhelps
      AskWoody MVP

      I started looking into Linux about 5 years ago now, shortly after experiencing Win8 and imagining where it was heading.
      2 years ago (after 3 years of testing) I was able to migrate to Linux and friends/family came along.
      A few months ago the majority of us moved to Manjaro (a couple to Pop! OS).
      They’ve had 2 years’ Linux experience now and are capable of sharing/helping friends.
      I write install guides for them to follow and all goes well, rarely any issues at all for 2 years.
      Linux isn’t for everyone, those that can use the Linux equivalents like gimp, kolourpaint, openshot, simple scan, scribus, writer etc, get on quite well. Those that can’t will have a tough time of it.
      Macs are another option if they can afford the entry price.
      greynad

      Edit: Move to appropriate section.

      Perhaps you could start a sub-forum on Manjaro Linux and include your install guides and other helpful documents you have written. This would be extremely helpful for those who are considering which Linux distro to deploy.

      Group "L" (Linux Mint)
      with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
      • #199150 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Lounger

        Mr JimPhelps,

        I am interested in trying out different Linux distros in a virtual machine. I have both a Windows PC with a roomy disk (750 GB) and enough central memory (8 GB) and an older Intel I-7, 4-core “sandy bridge” CPU now running Windows 7 Pro, x64. I also have a new-ish Mac (ca. 2015) with an 2.4 GHz I-7, 4-core “Haswell” CPU, running macOS “Sierra”.

        Would you recommend some virtual machine for either?

        And while I am at it: Thanks for your repeated and helpful explaining of the more user-friendly varieties of Linux.

         

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  OscarCP.
        • #199164 Reply

          MrJimPhelps
          AskWoody MVP

          Oscar:

          Thank you for your kind words. You often give a different perspective on things, which is both helpful and interesting.

          When I first tried Linux, I installed it in an virtual machine on my Windows 7 computer. I soon wanted to do a real install, so I added a hard drive and installed it in a dual boot format. But the virtual machine way was very convenient in that I could instantly click over to Linux. There was no delay waiting for the machine to reboot into Linux. The fact that you have 8 GB of memory means that you have enough memory to keep the Linux VM running all the time, which means that you can access it instantly, with just one click. This will be an excellent way to become familiar with different distros of Linux.

          I use VMWare Workstation Player for my virtual machine software. I had some difficulty trying to get Oracle Virtual Box up and running, but I have had no difficulty at all with VMWare Workstation Player. If you have 64-bit Windows installed as your host OS, then VMWare would be a good choice.

          Buena Suerte!

          Jim

          Group "L" (Linux Mint)
          with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #199185 Reply

            JohnW
            AskWoody Lounger

            I agree that the VMware Player is an excellent option!  I have used that with much success.  That and VirtualBox are both great options, if your CPU and BIOS support hardware virtualization.

            The best thing about running Linux in a Virtual Machine (VM) vs. dual booting is that you can run both systems concurrently.  Just click back and forth with a keyboard shortcut, sharing the same computer hardware, network,  monitor, keyboard and mouse.

            The first time you accomplish this with a VM, you will never go back to dual booting.  Trust me!  Dual booting has it’s place, but if your CPU and RAM are up to it, VM is the way to go!

            You can use shared folders on a secondary drive partition, an external drive, or a network share.  It is easy to move files between systems.  I have also allowed copy/paste clipboard between guest and host systems, so if you have an application open on one system, you can copy data and paste it directly into an app on the other system.  Huge time saver!  🙂

            4 users thanked author for this post.
          • #199199 Reply

            Ascaris
            AskWoody MVP

            I use VirtualBox for my VMs (host=Linux, guest=Windows 7 and 8.1), and I have it running successfully on several of my PCs, so if anyone has any issues, I may be able to help.  I’m but a babe in the woods with VMs myself, but I can try!

            It is possible that a VM could be soft bricked with an update (a hard or true brick would generally mean the motherboard underwent a failed BIOS update and is deader than a doornail unless surgery is done on the motherboard).  Soft bricks are relatively minor events compared to that, and are very often recoverable (though if you have a good backup, it’s often a lot less headache just to restore that and be done with it).

            In case of a failed update causing boot failure or other soft brick, the damage will be confined to the VM… the host OS will be fine.  As PKCano said, just delete the corrupted VM and copy the saved file (virtual hard drive) back into its place, assuming you have a copy from before it was corrupted.  It’s easy to do, so it really should be something you would do before installing updates or any other thing that has potential to mess things up.

            There are other ways of doing it from within the program itself too; in VirtualBox, you can right click the VM entry in the VM Manager program and select “clone,” then “Full clone.”  It will then create an exact duplicate of the VM you selected… so if the first one gets corrupted, just delete it and use the clone (and maybe clone it again so you have a backup).  This is not as secure as copying to an external hard drive, since the clone file is saved in the same place as the original, but it would be the easiest way to recover from a failed Windows update.  I do both; I have clones and I have copies on external media.  The clones are convenient and right there if I need; if that’s not good enough, I can use the copies.

            And then there are snapshots, which are kind of similar to Windows restore points…

             

            3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #199171 Reply

          PKCano
          AskWoody MVP

          I use Parallels Desktop for VMs on my Macs. Ypu can install Windows and Linux. Works like a charm!

          3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #199208 Reply

        anonymous

        Thankyou MrJimPhelps for you invitation.
        Firstly though, I should say that Manjaro is fully-rolling, not point-release. So don’t be waiting for 18.04LTS. For anyone that wants to give it a go, just grab the latest ISO and use it promptly.
        As I said previously, the majority of us are on Manjaro. That is actually Manjaro-Gnome. The overwhelming majority have adapted to Gnome very well and say they want to stay put. But for the few that just can’t get their head around Gnome I showed them XFCE… but they didn’t warm to that look either?
        I noticed there’s a Budgie spin of Manjaro, so showed them some Solus-Budgie screenshots and they liked what Budgie looked like.
        I installed Manjaro-Budgie on a test rig so I could show them and the response was quite enthusiastic, so I did theirs the same and they’re happy.
        I wrote a walk-thru guide for them so they could do it exactly the same way again themselves.
        They still like using Windows terminology & DVDs, hence the Budgie guide is written so.

        Manjaro-Budgie from DVD

        Start the installer from the Welcome screen, it’s a very easy to follow wizard. Don’t select to automatically log you in and I recommend you tick box to use the same password for Admin too. Once the installation wizard has completed, restart the computer & remove the DVD.

        Once booted to desktop, the Welcome screen will popup, turn off the slider in Welcome screen so it doesn’t always show at startup.

        Now hit Win/Start key and start typing: budgie desktop settings, and when you see it go in and under Appearance > Style > turn on the Dark theme
        then under Panels > Top Panel > Settings > select Bottom
        close Budgie Desktop Settings

        Now hit Win/Start key and start typing: add/remove software, and when you see it go in and under Preferences > AUR > turn on Enable AUR support and tick box to Check for updates from AUR
        close Add/Remove Software

        Now use the Network icon (bottom right) to connect to your WiFi… select your WiFi and enter the passphrase.

        Pretty shortly you should be informed of updates… go get ‘em! Once this first batch of updates are installed I restart before moving on, I suggest you do too as we’ll be installing Google Chrome and some MS fonts.

        After restart, open Add/Remove Software, right-click on it’s icon in the bottom panel (Taskbar) and select Pinned, now it will be one click access from now on.
        Click on the magnifying glass and type in: google-chrome
        when found, right-click on it and select Install, click Apply, Password etc

        If you want MS fonts like arial, times roman, comic sans, etc, then type in: ttf-ms-fonts
        when found, right-click on it and select Install, click Apply, etc

        As well as Google Chrome and MS fonts, install the following (as you did above) so you can tackle anything…
        asunder (CD Ripper)
        audacity (Audio Editor)
        darktable (Lightroom equivalent)
        fbreader (eBook Reader)
        gimp (Photoshop equivalent)
        gnome-boxes (Easy Virtual Machine)
        google-earth-pro
        goldendict (Dictionary)
        handbrake (Video Transcoder)
        homebank (Personal Accounting)
        inkscape (Vector Graphics Editor)
        kolourpaint (Paint equivalent)
        openshot (Video Editor)
        scribus (Publisher equivalent)
        skype
        aisleriot (gnome Patience game)
        gnome-mahjonng (gnome Mahjonng game)

        Open Manjaro Settings Manager > Language Packages > Install Packages…

        That’s pretty much it, you’ll find it very easy to navigate around the system, to pin apps to the bottom panel you just open the app, right-click on the panel icon and select Pinned. You drag them sideways to change order, and you just deselect Pinned to unpin them… pretty easy, eh?

        If desired, you can set LibreOffice default save as Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint via Tools, Options, Load/Save, General, and select preferred file types, then click OK.

        Browser extensions you might want to consider are uBlock Origin and Decentraleyes… I use them both.

        Enjoy!

        For the Budgie installation above, I used the ISO from: https://osdn.net/projects/manjaro-community/storage/budgie/17.1.10/

        The ISOs change regularly as they are just current snapshots of where the release is at that time.
        Whether you prefer XFCE, Gnome, Budgie, is up to you. The back-end stuff like updates, turning on AUR, installing software is pretty much the same, so you could pluck those bits out if you’re familiar with XFCE or Gnome and rather give them a try instead of Budgie.
        greynad

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #199248 Reply

          anonymous

          Thankyou Elly, I have to wonder if the target audience will ever see this now considering how hard it was to find it… Anyway, I felt I should add this to my previous post.
          Printing/scanning can be awkward on Linux.
          The typical setup for us is a Linux desktop in the study/office and a multifunction connected via USB.
          They’re either Canon MG6250, MG5350, and various large white HP Office-jet things. I had the Linux Canon drivers and the HPs are plug-in-USB-and-they-work.
          AUR in Manjaro provides the print/scan drivers for the Canons and the HPs are still plug-n-play.
          This is of course a compromise that we are all more than willing to accept to use Linux.
          iPads, MacBooks etc use AirPrint and Linux laptops just come to the printer and hi-jack the desktops USB lead.
          A neighbour had a large Brother without USB and said he got it doing everything wirelessly but could never explain what he did?
          If folks are weighing up whether they should or shouldn’t, this would be pertinent info for their ears.
          In fact my usual 1st question is whether everything they want to do can be accomplished on an iPad.
          If yes, it ends there.
          If not, can they afford a MacBook or iMac.
          If not, do they have access to a pretty decent PC that can run Linux, & can they accept Linux equivalents, & can they accept the USB print/scan thing.
          If not, I have very little to offer them other than Good Luck (with kindness and not sarcasm).
          My intent is to help, not rubbish anyone. It has to be a solution they can live with everyday.
          Thanks for listening,
          greynad

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #199252 Reply

            anonymous

            Whoops! I think the neighbours Brother was white, but the big HP Office-jets might be grey (I have the Canons).
            I noticed it just as I hit submit, but too late etc… not a biggie, but accuracy is very important to anyone weighing up whether or not to do something. Sorry for the slip.
            g

            • #199274 Reply

              MrJimPhelps
              AskWoody MVP

              Very helpful stuff. Makes me want to install Manjaro in a VM!

              Group "L" (Linux Mint)
              with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
            • #199500 Reply

              anonymous

              For anyone that’s interested, here’s the guide I wrote for Pop! OS…

              Installing Pop!_OS 18.04 LTS from USB

              Boot to USB, wait and follow the installation wizard.
              Once completed, shut down computer, remove USB, and restart computer.
              Once restarted, follow the wizard to setup the user account and connect internet, etc.
              Wait for the Updates Available popup to appear, then click on it, install updates and restart computer.
              Once restarted, click on Activities (top left) and open Terminal and copy/paste the following…
              sudo apt install ttf-mscorefonts-installer

              When the EULA appears, use Tab key to get to Ok, then use cursor arrow keys to get to Yes.

              Now copy/paste the following…
              sudo apt install ubuntu-restricted-extras

              When asked, type y followed by Enter
              Close Terminal

              Open the Pop!_Shop application and install VLC MediaPlayer…
              Close Pop!_Shop, open VLC and go into Preferences > Video
              Then change Output from Automatic to XVideo output (XCB)
              Close VLC

              Open the Pop!_Shop application and install GNOME Tweaks…
              Close Pop!_Shop
              Open Tweaks > Top Bar > turn on Activities Overview Hot Corner
              > Windows > you can restore missing Maximize, Minimize window buttons (if desired)

              Launch Firefox, go to: https://www.google.com/chrome/?platform=linux
              Select and install the 64bit.deb (for Debian/Ubuntu).

              Launch Google Chrome, go into Google Chrome settings, set it to Show Home button and to Use system title bars and borders. Close Google Chrome.
              Browser extensions you might want to consider are uBlock Origin and Decentraleyes

              If desired, you can set LibreOffice default save as Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint via Tools, Options, Load/Save, General, and select preferred file types, then click OK.

              Open the Pop!_Shop application and install gufw Firewall Configuration…
              Open Firewall Configuration and turn the Firewall ON.

              To match the other folders in Files (file manager), you might want to set the Downloads folder to sort A-Z

              You might want to disable the Dim screen when inactive and Blank screen under Power in Settings
              You might also want to change the Desktop and Lock Screen backgrounds (no need for instructions for this).

              The rest is pretty much adding the additional software you’d like from the Pop!_Shop application.

              Some suggestions are…
              audacity (Audio Editor)
              brasero (CD Burner)
              darktable (Lightroom equivalent)
              fbreader (eBook Reader)
              gimp (Photoshop equivalent)
              gnome boxes (Easy Virtual Machine)
              gnucash (Business Accounting)
              goldendict (Dictionary)
              gparted (Disk Partitioning)
              handbrake (Video Transcoder)
              homebank (Personal Accounting)
              inkscape (Vector Graphics Editor)
              libreoffice base (Access equivalent)
              openshot (Video Editor)
              kolour paint (Paint equivalent)
              pulseaudio volume control gtk (additional control)
              scribus (Publisher equivalent)
              sound juicer (CD Ripper)
              thunderbird (email client supporting multiple Profiles)
              transmission gtk (BitTorrent Client)
              uget (Download Manager)
              aisleriot solitaire (gnome Solitaire game)
              gnome mahjongg (gnome Mahjongg game)

              Skype is available here: https://www.skype.com/en/get-skype/
              Make sure you select the DEB version

              Opera browser is available at: https://www.opera.com/computer/linux

              Now to select your preferred Default Applications…
              Open Settings > Details > Default Applications and select your own preferences like Google Chrome, Thunderbird, VLC, etc

              Now to organise your Favorites (dock launched by Activities)
              Activities > Show Applications > All simply right-click on an application and select Add to Favorites

              You might consider…
              Firefox Web Browser
              Google Chrome
              Skype
              Thunderbird
              Files
              Pop!_Shop
              Screenshot
              Simple Scan
              LibreOffice

              Enjoy your new POP!_OS 18.04 LTS

              I used the INTEL/AMD ISO available here: https://system76.com/pop
              greynad

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #199759 Reply

              anonymous
          • #199258 Reply

            PKCano
            AskWoody MVP

            Anonymous posts have to be moderated individually by an MVP. Which means they may remain pending for an undefined amount of time depending on many things. Please be patient and refrain from re-posting immediately. We’ll be with you as soon as possible.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #199381 Reply

            Ascaris
            AskWoody MVP

            I’ve heard of the issues that can happen with printing or scanning in Linux, but they can also go very nicely.  In terms of scanners, you can consult the SANE database of supported devices to see if yours (or one you are thinking of buying, if you don’t have it yet) is there.  SANE is the standard scanner support library in Ubuntu and Mint (and probably other distros, but I don’t have enough experience to say)… it stands for “Scanner Access Now Easy.”

            For printers, I do not know about a centralized database, but the manufacturer’s site may have what you need.

            In my case, I was lucky… I have a Canon “ImageClass” MF-3010 scanner/B&W laser printer that is well-supported in SANE and has printer drivers from Canon.  I didn’t have to do anything to get the scanner working in Linux (Mint 18.3) other than plug it in; with the printer, I had previously stated that it worked just the same way, but it looks like I had actually installed the Canon driver from their site and forgotten about it.

            It works perfectly in Linux in scanning and printing modes.  It all depends on whether drivers are available for your device, and since Linux has a limited market share, a lot of vendors don’t bother with Linux drivers.

            If you do have a VM running Windows, you can always print or scan from that by passing the USB device through directly to the VM, and install your printer/scanner driver in Windows therein.  You could also do your editing of whatever file it is in Linux, export to PDF, then put the PDF file in the shared folder for the VM (which is a folder the host and guest OS both have access to) and print it from the VM.  Inconvenient compared to doing it directly, but it’s at least a tool in your toolbox if you need it.

            • #199770 Reply

              MrJimPhelps
              AskWoody MVP

              You are indeed lucky to have gotten your scanner working in Linux with no trouble.

              I have had two Canon Pixma printer/scanners, and one Canon Selphy printer.

              I set the two Pixmas up as network devices. I first installed them in Windows, then in Linux. If you first install them in Windows, then it is simple to add them as printers in Linux; but if you have not yet installed them in Windows, you will have a hard time finding them on the network in order to install them in Linux. Likely if you first install them in your Windows VM, you will then be able to easily add them in Linux. The print quality is better if you first install the printer in Windows, then add it in Linux, as opposed to downloading and installing the Canon Linux printer software.

              Scanning was a different story. I never could get them to work as scanners in Linux, even though they were working in Windows. I ended up going to the Canon Asia (Thailand) website and downloading the Debian scanner driver and instructions – don’t forget to download the instructions as well! (Not sure if the Debian driver will work for Manjaro.) I then very carefully followed the instructions for installing the scanner driver; after doing that, both Pixmas scanned successfully in Linux! So far, I have only been able to get the Canon scanning software to work, but it does a decent job, so it’s not a problem. (If I need something fancier than that, I open my Windows 8.1 VM and use my scanner software there.) The Canon scanning software is launched by a terminal command; so to make things easier, I created a launcher (shortcut) for it.

              I never could get the Selphy to work. I had to add it as a USB printer in my Windows 8.1 VM, and then go into the VM whenever I want to print.

              Update: The Selphy is visible as a printer in Linux! It may be because I set it up for direct wireless printing, rather than as a wifi printer. I’ll have to research that further.

              Group "L" (Linux Mint)
              with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
    • #199187 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Lounger

      Thanks PKCano, JohnW and MrJimPhelps for your reassuring comments on using a VM to run different operating systems on a Windows machine or a Mac.

      I have one more question:

      Le’t imagine I have a Mac and use a VM to emulate, for example, Windows. When there are updates for Windows, would I install them while running Windows on the VM and in the usual way, e.g. using WU (or at all)?

      And what happens when such an update goes bad? At least in most cases, could that brick the VM? Just the VM? In other words: can one expect that what happens in the VM stays in the VM?

       

      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  OscarCP.
      • #199190 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        The guest operating system in the VM is just the same as if it were on hardware. You do updates, you install programs, you store data the same as if it were an independent PC.

        Backing up a VM is simply copying the file off onto an external HDD. If the working one has a problem, just delete the VM and copy the saved file back in it’s place. No stressful backups – just copy the file.

        5 users thanked author for this post.
        • #199193 Reply

          JohnW
          AskWoody Lounger

          You can also do snapshots of the working VM or clone it.  But the simplest way is probably like you said, plus having a backup routine that copies your VM folder from the host to a backup location.  I image the drive with my VM folder (on a secondary HDD on my PC) every Saturday to an external USB3 drive with Macrium.  Like you said, if anything goes bad, just copy it back over. 🙂

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #199192 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        I think I did several topics on VMs in MacOS in the MacOS Forum, if you want to read them.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #199275 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody MVP

        I exit VMWare altogether (thereby closing all open VMs), and then make a copy of each VM’s folder contents (I don’t recall if it was one file or more than one). I keep a folder called VM Backups (or something like that), and within that folder I have the following folders:
        * Windows 7 (64) (2018-06-22)
        * Windows 7 (32) (2018-06-22)
        and so on.

        In this way, it’s very easy to fix a broken or bricked VM – as PKCano said, delete the contents of the working folder, and copy the contents of the desired backup folder into the working folder. You then crank up the VM once again.

        So if you install a bad update or break the VM in some other way, it takes about two or three minutes to fix it.

        And in answer to your question, if you are running Windows in the VM, a rogue Windows update won’t do anything to your host OS.

        However, a rogue update to the host OS could have an impact of some sort on a VM that is within that host OS. Probably won’t ever happen, but theoretically it might.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #199297 Reply

          JohnW
          AskWoody Lounger

          Another cool thing about a VM is that it should be portable.

          I have moved VM folders from one host to another using VirtualBox on each host.  Opened up the VM file in VirtualBox on the other host, and it was up and running!  I assume that the same goes for VMWare.

          I have moved several VMs, both Windows and Linux guests, from a Linux host to a Windows host, without issue. 🙂

          In fact you can download pre-configured VMs from the internet.

          https://www.osboxes.org/

          “OSBoxes offers you ready-to-use Linux/Unix guest operating systems.

          If you don’t want to install secondary OS alongside with your main OS but still want to use/try it, then you can use VirtualBox or VMware on your host operating system to run virtual machine.

          Simply download any image you want and run it as VM.”

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #199771 Reply

            MrJimPhelps
            AskWoody MVP

            It doesn’t get any easier than that!

            Group "L" (Linux Mint)
            with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
            1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #199214 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Lounger

      Thanks again to all of you, for clarifying the question about updating the VM emulated OS, and the other one about if it is true that “what happens in the VM, stays in the VM”, when it comes to dealing with poisonous updates of the emulated OS and other mishaps that would tank permanently a “real” OS. And, finally, thanks also for making the use of a VM clearer in general, to me.

       

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #200834 Reply

      Microfix
      AskWoody MVP

      Manjaro News for XFCE, KDE and Gnome.

      Manjaro 17.1.11 July 2nd, 2018 Manjaro Team

      We are happy to announce fresh install media 17.1.11 for all our Official Releases, now available from our online storage partner OSDN:

      More info here: https://manjaro.org/news/

      | 2x Group A- W8.1 | Group A+ Linux Hybrid | Group W W7 Pro | Group W XP Pro
        No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #200842 Reply

        JohnW
        AskWoody Lounger

        Good info!

        Interesting that Manjaro 17.1.11 is shipping with KDE Plasma 5.13.2, the just released bug fixed version of KDE Plasma 5.13 that was released in June.  https://www.kde.org/announcements/plasma-5.13.2.php

        By comparison, the LTS version of Kubuntu 18.04 is shipping with KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS.

        https://wiki.ubuntu.com/BionicBeaver/ReleaseNotes/Kubuntu

        So I guess it’s just a matter of whether you prefer a bleeding edge DE or not.

      • #202130 Reply

        anonymous

        Majority of our group are on Gnome, once you break through that imaginary wall you love it, otherwise you won’t.

        XFCE is the most ‘Official’ version and best bet for anyone wanting a Start-Menu based distro from the outset.

        XFCE can look slightly old fashioned if you’ve already given Gnome a go and then want to go back to a Start-Menu based UI… this is when Budgie’s more modern look ‘might’ float your boat.

        Budgie’s still on 17.1.10 right now…
        17.1.11 ISO should drop fairly soon here: https://osdn.net/projects/manjaro-community/storage/budgie/17.1.11/

        But 17.1.10 ISOs aren’t too stale to use right now while waiting for 17.1.11 to drop (and the above Budgie guide would still be current)

        Mate 17.1.11 is already here: https://osdn.net/projects/manjaro-community/storage/mate/17.1.11/

        Remember Manjaro is rolling, so 17.1.10 and 17.1.11 are effectively just snapshot ISOs a few weeks apart, so using 17.1.10 when 17.1.11 has only just dropped shouldn’t be an issue, once updated it becomes the latest anyway.

        There’s no .deb files with Manjaro as it’s Arch based. Turning on AUR covers nearly everything instead of downloading .deb files or adding various repos as done with Ubuntu based distros.

        greynad

    • #202905 Reply

      JohnW
      AskWoody Lounger
      • #202910 Reply

        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        From the Register:

        If you’re an Arch Linux user who downloaded a PDF viewer named “acroread” in the short time it was compromised, you’ll need to delete it.

        qpdfviewer is the default pdf viewer in Manjaro, acroread is a substitute in the software repo’s (now removed)

        | 2x Group A- W8.1 | Group A+ Linux Hybrid | Group W W7 Pro | Group W XP Pro
          No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
        1 user thanked author for this post.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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