• Microsoft: changing taskbar location in Windows 11 is not important

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    #2438375

    https://www.neowin.net/news/microsoft-says-changing-taskbar-location-in-windows-11-is-not-important/

    Tali Roth, Microsoft’s Head of Product :

    “When it comes to something like actually being able to move the taskbar to different locations on the screen, there’s a number of challenges with that. When you think about having the taskbar on the right or the left, all of a sudden the reflow and the work that all of the apps have to do to be able to understand the environment is just huge.

    And when you look at the data, while we know there is a set of people that love it that way and, like, really appreciate it, we also recognize that this set of users is really small compared to the set of other folks that are asking for other features. So at the moment we are continuing to focus on things that I hear more pain around.

    It is one of those things that we are still continuing to look at, and we will keep looking to feedback, but at the moment we do not have a plan or a set date for when we would, or if we should, actually build the side taskbar.”

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    • #2438438

      “When it comes to something like actually being able to move the taskbar to different locations on the screen, there’s a number of challenges with that. When you think about having the taskbar on the right or the left, all of a sudden the reflow and the work that all of the apps have to do to be able to understand the environment is just huge.”

      Did you think people had forgotten that you’d managed exactly the thing with the “challenges” with Windows 10? You managed then… do it some more. Simple. No need to come up with some new strategy as you want people to think you would have to do.

      It’s become quite fashionable for software devs to pursue a strategy of minimalism in the last few years, and “but we only have limited resources! Wouldn’t you rather we spent it somewhere else?” has become the rallying cry for lopping off features and reducing what software can do. Mozilla has used this same excuse just about every time they remove a feature they deem unimportant because they believe that only a minority of the user base makes use of it (which has led to the situation where only a minority of the browser users make use of Firefox, which by their own standards makes it a good idea to remove Firefox support from web sites).

      In the Linux world, this minimalist trend has led to the situation where the supposedly old and obsolete ‘synaptics’ touchpad driver, despite being almost completely unmaintained for the last few years, is still vastly superior to the new actively developed libinput driver.

      Despite the claims of the relative impossibility of developing software that has customization options so that the software can adapt to the user rather than forcing the user to adapt to the software, there are plenty of examples of smaller development projects who just do it anyway despite its supposed difficulty. Somehow, they manage to maintain focus on delivering the best experience for the end user, and as competent devs, they don’t worry so much about making their own lives easier if it would mean making things harder for some percentage of end users. Yes, software development is hard, and software that has more features is harder than software that does not. If that meant the simple thing was always better because it was easier for the devs, MS could just drop Word and have people use Notepad.

      Looking at the percentage of users who make use of some “niche” feature to try to determine whether that feature deserves to exist is not the right idea. It’s the effect of having many such features that makes the product fit a broad variety of users and use cases. While few people may use any given “niche” feature, it’s certain that many or most people will use at least one feature that may otherwise be on the chopping block for its lack of popularity. Remove every feature that only a minority of users use and you will find that the percentage of disgruntled users are no longer a minority that can be safely ignored.

      Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, Kubuntu 22.04
      XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/16GB & GTX1660ti, Kubuntu 22.04

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2438672

      Put together enough minorities and you get a majority.
      Linux looks sweeter every day.. 🐧

      🍻

      Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2440126

      Can understand the programing issue, but after I show left or right side to my clients, explaining that on the left of a 9 X 16 screen, why take up your 9 space where you do all your work, with a Win function? On the left your work can co-exist when Win wants your attention and won’t hide the TB. Truth be told I can’t understand why it wasn’t put on left or right in all Win versions.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2440173

      Can understand the programing issue

      There are none.
      If a small developers group can develop Satrt11 which can move the TaskBar, so can Microsoft.

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