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  • Microsoft is shifting to an annual release schedule?

    Posted on Alex5723 Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums Outside the box Rumors and what-ifs Microsoft is shifting to an annual release schedule?

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      • #2286432 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Mary Jo Foley at https://www.zdnet.com/

        What’s going to happen with “regular” Windows 10 during all this? The spokesperson also declined to answer that question.

        Microsoft may end up releasing just one feature update per year for Windows 10 starting in 2021 to free up more engineers to be able to focus on both Windows 10X and Windows 10, I’m hearing from my sources

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2286465 Reply
        doriel
        AskWoody Lounger

        Seems legit to me. I think I will appreciate less confusion and less version alive at the same time. I mean Win 10 builds.

        But I am affraid, what Windows 10X will really be.

        App developers won’t have to make any changes—Win32 apps will “just work” with Windows 10X.

        I think this means MSFT copied its Windows 10 core again and made lot of changes to it and built nice new fence around it..

        Windows 10X will run traditional Win32 desktop apps, but it will run them in a container.

        This seems a interesting for security.

        Announcement at May on howtogeek:

        Microsoft says a reboot to install a big operating system update should take less than 90 seconds.

        Also

        Windows 10X will run traditional Win32 desktop apps, but it will run them in a container. Windows 10X will also run Univeral Windows Apps (UWP) and Progressive Web Apps (PWA), and it will also run those in containers.

        Better times for UWP comming? I thought it didnt perform very well so far.
        Since Windows 10X is designed for two screen device MSFT Surface Neo, I cant stop thinking about bloated batteries, zero repairability index and purposely blocked updates for “native” MSFT devices.

        But still I believe I will be nicely surprised. I am really looking forward to it. Who knows. Maybe 10X is better successor.

        Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

        HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by doriel.
        • #2286581 Reply
          Alex5723
          AskWoody Plus

          Windows 10x reminds me of Windows 7 home basic, Windows RT, Windows 10 S.. total failure.

          • #2286593 Reply
            joep517
            AskWoody MVP

            That is a bit premature. If it does run Wn32 apps that is a big step compared to RT. If a user can still install whatever they wish that is a big step up from S. At this point, we don’t know for sure what the limitations may be. Rather than just trash it now I’d rather wait and see what is really there.

            --Joe

          • #2286682 Reply
            doriel
            AskWoody Lounger

            What I still do not understand the desire microsoft has – to maintain 29 operating systems and 173 builds of sthese sytems. I though they are one of the most intelligent people on the planet, but now I have real doubts about it.
            But still.. Windows 10X can be good and reliable. Lets wait and have look!

            Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

            HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

      • #2286981 Reply
        EP
        AskWoody_MVP

        check out this Neowin article published a few days ago, Alex5723:

        https://www.neowin.net/news/the-case-for-biannual-windows-10-feature-updates

      • #2286985 Reply
        EP
        AskWoody_MVP

        Ms Foley of ZDNet wrote that about “one feature update per year for Windows 10” in one of her articles in late July 2020.

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by EP.
      • #2287767 Reply
        WSmmi16
        AskWoody Lounger

        As a non-geek – it seems that Microsoft’s two releases a year ends up having one release that is ‘good’ and the other is full of ‘bugs’ – with the good one following the buggy one.

        If a annual release is a good one, more power to them; if not heaven help us.

      • #2287776 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        For people who need stable software to do their work without unnecessary distractions, even one release per year is too many, unless there is the option to not to install a new major release until the nth new one comes out, staying with the present one until then. In the case of Macs, that means one can sit on one OS version for up to three years, skipping the versions in between. As I have done already and now am planning to do again. I think that there is even greater flexibility with Linux, although I have not looked into this in enough detail yet.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

        • #2287785 Reply
          Cybertooth
          AskWoody Plus

          If I understand the system correctly, some (many?) Linux distros release LTS (long-term support) versions in the spring every other year on even-numbered years, and support for these LTS versions continues for 5 years. So, for example, an LTS version released in 2020 would be good until 2025.

          Of course, in practical terms you’d be using a specific version for less than five years, as  you would probably not want to wait until the next LTS release in 2026 but would likely prefer to install the 2024 version. This would give you four years of fully supported use (2020-24). That’s still much better than the new Windows support cycle.

           

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2287783 Reply
        Moonwink
        AskWoody Lounger

        What if all I wanted from Windows was a platform to run the software I need to get things done?  What if I don’t need the chicklet screen full of apps?  I appreciate the updates fixing the security problems as they’re discovered but I don’t need and don’t want “added features”.  With every update I find myself searching for how to fix the problems they cause.  Having my download directory grouped by date is a PITA but it was an added feature.  Who woke up one day and decided everyone should be forced to group their download directory by date?  You mean to tell me there was a clamor demanding that “feature”?  If there are multiple versions of Windows, let’s split one off for users that prefer the classic desktop and don’t want, like or need glitz.  Just give me functionality!  I’d be happy with XP or 7 and Office 2003.  Upgrading has been brough but trouble and hours wasted trying to make things work again.

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