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  • Microsoft officially clarifies: Win10 version 1803 is not compatible with Intel 660p and Pro 6000p solid state drives

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Microsoft officially clarifies: Win10 version 1803 is not compatible with Intel 660p and Pro 6000p solid state drives

    • This topic has 24 replies, 12 voices, and was last updated 3 years ago by anonymous.
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      • #191668
        woody
        Manager

        It’s taken Microsoft a while to come clean on the incompatibility, but we finally have details. Post coming in Computerworld.
        [See the full post at: Microsoft officially clrifies: Win10 version 1803 is not compatible with Intel 660p and Pro 6000p solid state drives]

        5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #191691
        John in Mtl
        AskWoody Lounger

        “When in tarnation tests this stuff? Win10 version 1803 bluescreens on brand new Surface Pros? Un-be-lievable.” (PS Woody: shouldn’t the 1st word be “who”, not “when”?)

        Unbeleivable is right!!  This is the first time in my long windows career that I’ve ever heard of a disk not being compatible with an OS, excluding the times when there were valid technical reasons spelled out well in advance.

        I mean… come on Microsoft, ***??

        Edit to remove content.

        4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #191707
        _Reassigned Account
        AskWoody Lounger

        Can’t believe this happens period, let alone on Microsoft’s own hardware. You got to wonder who in the world at Microsoft is testing this stuff?

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #191705
        anonymous
        Guest

        Not surprising.

        A company run by a short sighted, cloud focused, blind to customer demand individual.

        Providing products coded, barely supported, and thoroughly untested by a workforce using cut and paste coding, tunnel vision programming, and a feature focused and stability be d***ed workflow.

        Sure, what could go wrong with that?

        This will soon turn out to be a case study / white paper on how to run one of the most successful companies in the world into the ground.

        It won’t help us, but the scholars will get to see just how much inertia a giant like Microsoft really has, and we’ll all get to see just how dependent we’ve become on the Office suite and the Windows infrastructure.

        Edit for content

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #191712
        Rimes
        AskWoody Lounger

        I was introduced to the AskWoody (Howdy!) site due to this bug.  I have a Surface Laptop with the Intel SSDPEBKF256G7 SSD.  I upgraded to 1803, was receiving the BSOD, downloaded the Windows S 1709 image, refreshed laptop, converted to Pro and Windows Updates brought me right back into the 1803 mess.  It seems like I had read that they had pulled the update for affected SSDs…guess not.

        My story ends with me re-re-reinstalling Windows S, switching to Pro and deferring all feature updates.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #191717
        Jan K.
        AskWoody Lounger

        Some brand-spanking-new Surface Pro 2017 machines ship with the “bad” SSDs.

        Well, you can’t get everything right every time….

        Who in tarnation tests this stuff?

        If anyone at all, they’re either over- or underpaid…

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #191720
        WildBill
        AskWoody Plus

        Note to Woody: The article link isn’t on the post yet.

        This will soon turn out to be a case study / white paper on how to run one of the most successful companies in the world into the ground. It won’t help us, but the scholars will get to see just how much inertia a giant like Microsoft really has, and we’ll all get to see just how dependent we’ve become on the Office suite and the Windows infrastructure.

        The ones that will discover (if they haven’t already) that they’re dependent on Windows & Office are enterprise companies. Their choice is either to stay locked in & suffer, or to spend the money & make the effort to migrate to either Apple, Chromebook or Linux. The 1st 2 will be a hardware cost as well as retraining cost & the last will be a software cost & retraining. Consumers & small businesses will have the same issues & costs, but can move easier as they have a smaller number of computers.

        2 Machines for Now!
        #1: Windows 8.1, 64-bit, back in Group A.
        #2: Getting close to buying a refurbished Windows 10 64-bit, recently updated to v1909. Have broke the AC adapter cord going to the 8.1 machine, but before that, coaxed it into charging. Need to buy new adapter if wish to continue using it.
        Wild Bill Rides Again...

        • #191757
          anonymous
          Guest

          There’ll be major software costs for any enterprise running Apple/Chromebook as well.  Thanks to the push in the mid-late 2000s, many enterprises run webapps that never worked with anything outside of Internet Explorer.  Theoretically they should be able to be run on different browsers, but there’s millions of dollars (at least) that will need to be spent to get the front-end fixed, and that’s if the company who installed the system is still in business or left the code easily changeable.

          Ironically, standard Windows applications might be easier to run in Linux thanks to Wine.

      • #191740
        b
        AskWoody MVP

        Commenting on the topic has always been shut off. See how that works?

        Like commenting on ComputerWorld articles used to be possible but isn’t now?

        Windows 10 Pro version 21H2 build 19044.1151 + Microsoft 365 (group ASAP)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #191750
          woody
          Manager

          You’re absolutely right. That’s one of the reasons I had to get AskWoody built out for “the Lounge.” I really, really appreciate the feedback — even when I’m dead wrong.

          I still laugh when I read a blogger who says “never look at the comments.” They aren’t fortunate enough to have commenters as good as you folks.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #191744
        BobbyB
        AskWoody Lounger

        Brand new Surface Pro $2,199 (£2,149 or AU$3,299), Only use Windows for less than 2 years, Wiping the drive after 2 years and installing Linux Priceless
        You Seriously cant write stuff like this, and no mention yet of a “Fix” well that’s an awful lot of cash for 2 years computing.

        4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #191752
        Cybertooth
        AskWoody Plus

        People, people, why are you getting all bent out of shape? Haven’t you heard that Mother Microsoft knows what’s best for us and that’s why they won’t let us pick and choose our updates through the UI any more? It’s for our own good, you know. If you have one of the affected Surface devices, just let the upgrade through and allow the process to work as designed. You’ll be on the latest, greatest, and most secure version of Windows – evah!

        And besides, a computer that won’t boot up cannot get hacked!! Have you thought about that, huh? We should be THANKING Microsoft. I’m going out to get one of those Surface Pros with the right SSD model, before other wise customers scoop them up.

         

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #191796
          anonymous
          Guest

          Hmmmm, rendering a PC system unbootable as a security enhancement is a new and novel concept. Why didn’t somebody think of this earlier so the Surface owners know they are dealing with a feature, not a bug? Before the W10 saga culminates I surmise Mr Nadella will teach us all many things, including how to do great violence to the English vernacular!

          3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #191753
        woody
        Manager

        On a possibly related note….

        There have been lots of complaints about slow Toshiba SSDs, compared to Samsung SSDs, in the Surface Pro 2017 256 GB SKUs.

        From HTee:

        Bought a SP2017 yesterday and it had really bad light bleed so i exchanged for another today. Better screen but to my surprise it had a terribly slow Toshiba SsD in it rather than the Samsung. I thought only surface laptop was using that Toshiba drive. Anyway to tell by looking at the box before buying?

        From downeaster59:

        New Surface Pro (i5, 8gb, 256gb) – slow Toshiba SSD. My SSD seems to have very low performance numbers. Below are the Crystal Disk Mark results.  What could be some causes? Or is my SSD defective?

        Whaddya want to bet that MS shifted at least some of its new Surface Pro 2017s to Intel Pro 6000p SSDs, because of the complaints?

        Frying pan, meet fire.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #191751
        anonymous
        Guest

        The Surface Pro is like any other first party system put out by a middleware manufacturer:  It sets the baseline in quality and User Experience and performance.  Google has the Pixel, AMD and NVidia have reference cards.

        Seems like Microsoft is nailing it with their Surface.  It’s showing us exactly what we’ve come to expect from Windows 10.  At least no one can claim they’re showing preferential treatment for their own devices anymore, right?

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #191763
        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody MVP

        I wonder if these 2017 Surface devices will ever be able to do an upgrade. If this isn’t fixed at some point, people with these devices will be stuck with a version of Windows 10 that isn’t supported anymore.

        I’m with BobbyB:

        Wiping the drive after 2 years and installing Linux Priceless

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #191780
        anonymous
        Guest

        Not only can you not reply to the MS “discussion” but I you are encouraged to vote instead (as indicated when you hover over the disabled “reply” button). However voting can only be positive “I recommend this discussion” or not at all. So no comments or negative votes allowed!

        • #191797
          woody
          Manager

          I’m embarrassed to admit that I voted “for” the discussion before realizing that I couldn’t comment, couldn’t see comments – and couldn’t “un”vote afterwards.

          Yep, Microsoft loves feedback.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #191805
        anonymous
        Guest

        And what if these SSD’s in the Surface ‘glued shut’ systems can not be fixed with software?

        So the system meant to impress (that red carpet thingy) that the swanky company executive wanted will remain on a back level version of the OS until that version goes eol. Imagine the IT guy having to tell the cool guy that.

        A Surface systems that will not run Windows 10.
        – maybe they will run Windows 7

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #191908
          GoneToPlaid
          AskWoody Plus

          Hah! I don’t know since I don’t own and haven’t had my hands on any Surface product. Yet to install Win7, I think that one would have to access to the BIOS and certain BIOS features for Win 8.x and/or Win10 which would have to be disabled for Win7 to install successfully. I have encountered this issue on a couple of Win 8.1 compatible laptops which I reverted to Win7 even though the manufacturer told me that I couldn’t install Win7 on them.

          • #191992
            anonymous
            Guest

            You have to open the BIOS program, interrupting the boot with F1 or whatever the key is on that device, and disable secure boot, then enabling legacy boot, if you want to downgrade to Windows 7 sp1.

             

      • #192672
        anonymous
        Guest

        not so sure this isnt more to do with Spectre Meltdown (Intel) firmware update. My 600p 512 Gb wouldn’t boot all the way after the update but would into Safe Mode., drive disappeared within DiskPart but yet was there in Disk Management and File Explorer, …but all was well after new 600p SSD firmware update from Intel. No data lost other than crazied bootsector that had to be erased. Admittedly now I am booting from a non-NVMe drive to be on the safe side…

      • #200848
        anonymous
        Guest

        Well, if it is any consolation, my 2005 Toshiba satellite M60-148 with centrino and AMD graphics stopped upgrading at 1709 as well, the update just stops and it reboots back to 1709!

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #206676
        anonymous
        Guest

        I had buy my surface pro 2 months ago … And after the update it was getting a lot of blue screen errors and a week ago it suddenly stuck and turned off and never booted again .. it shows windows logo and flashes 3 to 4 times then go to uefi screen … And it took ages to restart from there too.
        I try boot windows from USB it doesn’t work … What I should do?
        I’m living in Iraq and there is no support from microMicr in my country. But my device has 2 years of warranty … What I should do?
        Can I brought it back to USA for fixing!?!

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