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  • Microsoft updated “Terms of Service” made clearer..?

    Posted on OscarCP Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums Admin IT Lounge Microsoft updated “Terms of Service” made clearer..?

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      • #2286363 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        I am not sure which forum is best for this topic, so, at a guess, it might be this one.

        Today I got an email in my Mac from MS under the title: “Your Services Agreement made Clearer” where, among other things, it reads:

        You’re receiving this email because we are updating the Microsoft Services Agreement, which applies to one or more Microsoft products or services you use. We’re making these updates to clarify our terms and ensure that they remain transparent for you, as well as to cover new Microsoft products, services and features.

        More about this here:

        https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/servicesagreement/upcoming-updates.aspx

        (It also contains a link to the full, modified “Agreement.”)

        The funny thing is, I don’t have any “services” from MS installed in my Mac. But I have a “product.” Except that this one is a piece of software soon to reach EOL (more about this, in a moment). And, while I have Windows 7 in my PC, this is now a defunct system, as far as MS is concerned. I am not subscribing to the life-extension agreement offered by MS and I am not even patching it with 0day supporting micropatches. I have it isolated from the Internet and, for communication between it and the rest of the world, I am using the Linux OS now co-installed in the PC with Win 7. I use Win 7 to run some older application software and, or to retrieve, now and then, older files that I still need to work with.

        I do have MS Office 16 in the Mac, but this is installed in the computer and, in all that matters, it is mine, as in “I own it”, not as in “I have it as a service graciously provided to mere mortals like me by MS”. So: I have “Office”, but as not something I get access to using “365”. The full modified agreement, linked to at the start of the MS article linked, in turn, above by me, does not list “Office” in general among the “services”, only “Office 365” and “Office 365” corresponding Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc.

        So why am I getting this? Office 2016 will expire in October 13th. I am still debating whether install version 2019, with MS strongly advising me to do so (but also reassuring me that is not going to reach into my Mac to disable my “Office 2016” applications if I don’t). There is already some talk that the next version of Office after “2019” will be available only as “365.” But that is neither here nor now (and who knows where things will be, down the years, in these remarkably uncertain times?) So, the mystery.

        In the meantime, the new terms of the Agreement might be interesting to those here who have enough patience to read a very long document mostly telling the readers what they cannot, or should not do.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2286535 Reply
        Cybertooth
        AskWoody Plus

        One link leading to another, I landed on this page for Office 2019 Home and Business, which contains the following text:

        1.   Updates. The softwareperiodically checks for software updates, and downloads and installs them for you. You may obtain updates only from Microsoft or authorized sources, and by accepting this agreement, you agree to receive these types of automatic updates without any additional notice.

        [typo in the original; emphasis added]

        Deal-breaker for me. I don’t want to go on my PC one morning to find out that Office stopped working because of some brilliant update that was pushed onto my machine without my knowledge or ability to control it; or that the UI has suddenly changed to suit some Redmond genius’s cool idea of how I should be using the product–er, I mean, the “service.”

         

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2286607 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Cybertooth: “… I landed on this page for Office 2019 Home and Business, which contains the following text …

        Well, this is an excellent reason for me not to “upgrade” Office 2016 (for Macs) to Office 2019 when 2016 runs out of support this October. Right now I have full control of the patching of 2016, having set in my Mac the MS application “Microsoft AutoUpdate” to the equivalent of “let me now but I’ll choose when to download and install.” From the document linked to above, it seems this will no longer be the case with 2019.

        Now this raises for me the question: what can I use to protect myself from the possibility of malware-infected PDF and PowerPoint files when I download, always in these formats, technical papers published in journals and, from the sites of technical meetings, the slides of presentations I am interested to have a good look at?

        I have Webroot SecureAnywhere as the AV and free Malwarebytes, both in the Mac and in the Windows 7 PC, although I no longer use Windows applications to connect to the Internet, as explained in my original post, using for that those for the Linux OS installed in dual boot in the same machine.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2286626 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          OscarCP wrote:
          Now this raises for me the question: what can I use to protect myself from the possibility of malware-infected PDF and PowerPoint files when I download, always in these formats

          Hmmmm, options not involving upgrade of Office 2016 on Mac?

          1) Continue to use Office 2016. Rely on real-time Webroot SecureAnywhere AV, along with manual MBAM free scans of downloaded files prior to opening. Yes, possible, but not recommended.

          2) Install current/up-to-date version of LibreOffice for Mac on your Mac.

          3) Switch your technical file downloading/paper reading/slide viewing over to your Linux Mint installation (also running LibreOffice BTW).

          Option 2 and Option 3 both recommended…
          up-to-date application software running on stable reliable up-to-date operating systems FTW!

          Hope this helps.

        • #2286633 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          Office 2016 extended support (security updates) expires 10/2025

          • #2286637 Reply
            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Anonymous: That is true for the Windows version. For the Mac version EOL is this October 13th. Why the difference? No idea.

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

            • #2286640 Reply
              OscarCP
              AskWoody Plus

              As to using LibreOffice, I have this problem: most of the places where I make my presentations require PDF or PPT files for the slides. In machines where LibeOffice works well, no problem. But I cannot know that for sure in advance when making a presentation at a conference. PDF files, on the other hand, are accepted in many — if not all — conferences and meetings, so one solution would be to convert to PDF a LibreOffice file that is more or less equivalent to a PPT file, so the slides will look much the same. But how does one convert such LibreOffice files to PDF? With PowerPoint one can do it directly using the “Save as PDF” option. Does LibreOffice have a similar option?

              Also, can one write mathematical formulas with LibreOffice as one can with PowerPoint?

              Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

              • #2286655 Reply
                Cybertooth
                AskWoody Plus

                @OscarCP, I just opened LibreOffice Impress (in Linux) to see if presentation slides can be converted to PDF. I do see under the File menu that there is an option to “Export as PDF”. When clicking on that item, a dialog came up giving me the choice to select “All”, “Selection”, or specified “Slides”.

                I don’t know, though, whether one can process formulas as you described. I believe you have Linux, so as LibreOffice is nearly ubiquitous in Linux distros you should be able to experiment with this and find out.

                 

                • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Cybertooth.
                1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #2286661 Reply
                OscarCP
                AskWoody Plus

                Cybertooth: For a quick test, I just installed LibreOffice on my Mac. This Mac version is the last one before version 7. At the LibreOffice site, it was recommended not to install 7 unless one is an early adopter (and I’m not one). It allows writing equations, but not directly in a presentation. It has to be done with a different tool and then copied and pasted to the presentation. I tried doing that, but the process was really awkward and the result was not encouraging. I shall look further into this.

                Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

              • #2286658 Reply
                anonymous
                Guest

                As to using LibreOffice, I have this problem: most of the places where I make my presentations require PDF or PPT files for the slides.

                Ooops, my bad, I missed the part about you presenting at conferences.

                one solution would be to convert to PDF a LibreOffice file that is more or less equivalent to a PPT file, so the slides will look much the same. But how does one convert such LibreOffice files to PDF?

                LibreOffice Impress, a presentation graphics program, allows you to save presentations directly in PowerPoint format(s), as well as native ODF. This can be handled on-the-fly on a document-by-document basis (File > Save As > select desired format in drop-down box, then click save button…), or pre-configured as default format for all files (Tools > Options > Load/Save > General > Default File Format > Document type: Presentation, Always save as: PowerPoint…). Or, if preferred, LibreOffice Impress will also allow you to export presentations as PDF files (File > Export as PDF > click export button…).

                Also, can one write mathematical formulas with LibreOffice as one can with PowerPoint?

                Yes, LibreOffice Math is provided specifically for writing mathematical formulas.

                As noted in my reply above, LibreOffice should already be installed and available for use in your existing Linux Mint installation – just spark it up & you should be good to go, er, test… 🙂

                Hope this helps.

                1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #2286678 Reply
                Alex5723
                AskWoody Plus
              • #2286699 Reply
                anonymous
                Guest

                Alex5723 wrote:
                There is a new version of LibreOffice 7.0

                OscarCP is aware of this, Alex. Please reread post #2286661 above, in which he clearly states the following: “This Mac version is the last one before version 7. At the LibreOffice site, it was recommended not to install 7 unless one is an early adopter (and I’m not one).”

              • #2286723 Reply
                anonymous
                Guest

                OscarCP wrote:
                For a quick test, I just installed LibreOffice on my Mac.

                I wrote:
                LibreOffice should already be installed and available for use in your existing Linux Mint installation – just spark it up & you should be good to go, er, test…

                @OscarCP

                Just a quick explanation re the last paragraph in my above post…

                Although it appears from the timestamp that my post was written several hours later, my above post #2286658 was actually written & submitted thirty minutes before your post #2286661.

                So although it may appear that I neglected to read & consider your post (about testing LibreOffice on your Mac) prior to suggesting you test LibreOffice on your Linux Mint installation, please understand that your post simply did not exist at the time. (I’m good, but I’m not “travel-thirty-minutes-into-the-future” good… 🙂 )

                This sort of thing happens sometimes because anonymous posts are moderated & the timestamp on anonymous posts reflects the time of moderator approval (i.e., rather than the time the post was actually submitted).

                Hope this helps (to explain something not obvious but sometimes helpful to understand).

                1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #2286696 Reply
                doriel
                AskWoody Lounger

                You can do this by “printing” into PDF. In fact you can convert everything to PDF like this. Maybe text will be saved as picture, but still does the job for me. Bullzip PDF can also merge multiple files into one PDF. Printing into PDF is very useful tool for me. Not using the MSFT default, cause its somehow malfunctioning.

                Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

                HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

                • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by doriel.
                1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2286694 Reply
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          Now this raises for me the question: what can I use to protect myself from the possibility of malware-infected PDF and PowerPoint files when I download, always in these formats

          This is NOT job for MS office, even fully patched O365 I think. Viruses and malware should be detected by special software. Not by outlook or word.

          Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

          HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

      • #2286636 Reply
        Cybertooth
        AskWoody Plus

        Now this raises for me the question: what can I use to protect myself from the possibility of malware-infected PDF and PowerPoint files when I download, always in these formats, technical papers published in journals and, from the sites of technical meetings, the slides of presentations I am interested to have a good look at?

        If it were a Windows machine, I’d recommend HitmanPro.Alert, which stays on the lookout for exploit attempts.

        I’m not familiar with Mac security, but if you’re handling non-sensitive files, then before opening them on your computer you may want to consider uploading them to VirusTotal for automated scanning by dozens of AV engines.

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2286704 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        At the LibreOffice site, it was recommended not to install 7 unless one is an early adopter (and I’m not one).

        If you’re a technology enthusiast, early adopter or power user, this version is for you!

        I am waiting for the Portable version. I am all three 🙂

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