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  • More problems with this month’s patches

    Home Forums AskWoody blog More problems with this month’s patches

    This topic contains 34 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  PKCano 2 years ago.

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    • #160725 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      The fun never ends. The Win8.1 Monthly Rollup, KB 4056895, now has an acknowledged bug: After installing this update, some systems running both PIC an
      [See the full post at: More problems with this month’s patches]

      7 users thanked author for this post.
    • #160733 Reply

      abbodi86
      AskWoody_MVP

      Security-only update also have the bug
      https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4056898/windows-81-update-kb4056898

      so we should not blame the rollup model for it 😀

      7 users thanked author for this post.
    • #160737 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody_MVP

      A different issue regarding Edge recently documented for all January 3, 2018 Windows 10 builds: https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/january-patch-tuesday-overview/#post-160636.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #160742 Reply

      Sparky
      AskWoody Plus

      The fun never ends. The Win8.1 Monthly Rollup, KB 4056895, now has an acknowledged bug:

      This might be a good sign in a round about way. “The first step in dealing with a problem is admitting you have one” It seems as though, in the past Microsoft has been reluctant to admit they screwed up. Is there such a thing as a 12 step program for a software company.   🙂

      Dell, W10 Professional, 64-bit, Intel Core i7 Quad, Group A

      HP, W7 Home Premium, 64-bit, AMD Phenom II, Group A

      9 users thanked author for this post.
      • #160746 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        That’s very true. The Office people learned more than a year ago that it’s better to spill the beans directly, rather than having them spilled for you.

        Wonder if the Surface folks will ever get a clue?

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #160771 Reply

          GoneToPlaid
          AskWoody Plus

          Naw, because Surface is supposed to be “perfect” and “the best” and with “above average” reliability in terms of all competing products.

    • #160764 Reply

      anonymous

      ? says:

      maybe “they” are continuing to write “older” hardware out of the kernel (patches)? Linux started doing that to my APIC on k8 machines after kernel 3.13.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #160773 Reply

      Noel Carboni
      AskWoody_MVP

      I’m happy to report that there were no new patches distributed through the Windows Update Catalog yesterday, Saturday Jan. 20.

      And I’m happy to report that with ONLY the January Internet Explorer patch in place on my Windows 7 and 8.1 systems my computing experience is still smooth, fast, and – amazingly – I have not been hit by malware!

      -Noel

      7 users thanked author for this post.
      • #160846 Reply

        radosuaf
        AskWoody Lounger

        I have all the updates apart from 2018-01 Windows rollup installed for both Win 8.1 and Office 2007 – everything running smoothly as well here.

        MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Aorus Radeon RX 570 4GB * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 1909 64-bit
        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #160933 Reply

      Pepsiboy
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’m happy to report that there were no new patches distributed through the Windows Update Catalog yesterday, Saturday Jan. 20.

      And I’m happy to report that with ONLY the January Internet Explorer patch in place on my Windows 7 and 8.1 systems my computing experience is still smooth, fast, and – amazingly – I have not been hit by malware!

      -Noel

      Noel,
      Well, I got frustrated with IE 11 locking up. SSOOOOO, I installed the Jan update for IE 11, and like you there have been no problems (SO FAR). Just hoping here that things will get sorted out soon.
      Dave

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #161007 Reply

      WildBill
      AskWoody Plus

      Question for the whiz kids here: How can you determine if you have PIC and/or APIC, & whether 1 or both are running? My CPU is an Intel Pentium 2020M, with the Intel 7 Series/C216 chipset family. They’re in an ASUS X55A laptop I bought in February 2013 with Win 8 (since updated to Win 8.1).

      Windows 8.1, 64-bit, back in Group A... & leaning toward Windows 10 V2004. As long as it's a Lot Less Buggy!
      Wild Bill Rides Again...

    • #161041 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      A question about the PIC and APIC interrupt controllers: are both enabled by default in the BIOS with the relatively more recent x64 Windows’ versions, e.g. 7 and up? Because, if they are, the solution to some real incompatibility between those settings (with some updates, such as the monthly S+Q rollout, as reported elsewhere in Woody’s) should be for MS to fix the patch, not for the user to tweak the BIOS, or shouldn’t it?.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W + Mac&Lx

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #161071 Reply

      Bill C.
      AskWoody Plus

      This came out 30 minutes ago.

      https://finance.yahoo.com/news/intel-asks-customers-stop-using-185213327.html

      If there was a EVER a better reason to hold off, this is a great one. Thanks Woody for your DefCon.

      I just saw my Linux Mint laptop got a new Intel firmware patch served up. I think it is time to wait a few days to see what happens.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #161463 Reply

        rc primak
        AskWoody_MVP

        Linux is in a different boat from Windows. Unless Broadwell or Haswell processors are present, there aren’t the widespread reports of problems which Windows users have had. My own core-i5 Skylake based NUC with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is still getting the latest kernel updates for kernel 4.4 and 4.13, and I have experienced business as usual, no problems.

        This in spite of Linus Torvald’s latest rants against Intel. Some Spectre mitigations are still pending, so I am not stopping Ubuntu Updates from supplying kernel updates. But cleaning up the older kernel versions is an issue if you take the latest updates as they are coming out.

        -- rc primak

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #161106 Reply

      anonymous

      January 22, 2018 @ 3:40pm:

      Just completed the installation of KB4074880 (a.k.a. re-release through Microsoft Catalog of KB4055532) for .NET Framework 4.7.1 to my Windows 7 SP1 system — I also manually installed via Microsoft Catalog download, as per your CW article, KB4054856 (prior to the install of KB4074880) — and, though I have not rebooted [not supposed to be necessary according to installers] my system, the error I receive when attempting to start the Powershell ISE (both 32- and 64-bit editions) remains the same as per the Windows Application Crash dialog:

      Problem Event Name:    PowerShell
      NameOfExe:    PowerShell_ISE.exe
      FileVersionOfSystemManagementAutomation:    6.3.9600.18728
      InnermostExceptionType:    System.IO.FileFormatException
      OutermostExceptionType:    System.Reflection.TargetInvocation
      DeepestPowerShellFrame:    indows.PowerShell.GuiExe.Internal.GPowerShell.Main
      DeepestFrame:    System.RuntimeMethodHandle.InvokeMethod
      ThreadName:    unknown
      OS Version:    6.1.7601.2.1.0.256.48
      Locale ID:    1033

      If Microsoft believes they have resolved this issue…  it is my opinion that they need to think again.

      Anyone know of a useful method to let Microsoft know that the issue persists and actually get a response that indicates they either know this ans are working on a fix for the fix, or are unaware and are interested in working with someone with the issue to find out why it persists (without taking a ding to the wallet)?

      After all, at this point all was fine before these .NET Framework patches!

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #161905 Reply

      MrBrian
      AskWoody_MVP

      From Stop errors caused by spurious interrupt on systems PIC and APIC interrupt controllers:

      “This update resolves the following issue:

      Microsoft has received reports of some customers on systems running with programmable and advanced programmable interrupt controllers getting stop errors after installing one of the following updates:

      January 3, 2018 – KB4056898 (Security-Only Update)
      January 8, 2018 – KB4056895 (Monthly Update)
      January 10, 2018 – KB4073576
      January 17, 2018 – KB4057401 (Preview of Monthly Rollup)”

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #161906 Reply

        MrBrian
        AskWoody_MVP

        The best installation order for Windows 8.1 users this month is probably:

        1. KB4077561 (manual installation)

        2. KB4073576 (manual installation)

        3. (January 2018 Windows monthly rollup) or (January 2018 Windows security-only update and Internet Explorer cumulative update)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #161917 Reply

          WildBill
          AskWoody Plus

          So we download KB4077561 from the Microsoft Update Catalog, & it will make sure that KB4073576 & the rollup or updates work? Cool Beans! Still, until Don Woody sez so, “Dis family Don’t Do Nuthin!”

          Windows 8.1, 64-bit, back in Group A... & leaning toward Windows 10 V2004. As long as it's a Lot Less Buggy!
          Wild Bill Rides Again...

          • #161919 Reply

            MrBrian
            AskWoody_MVP

            Right. The older updates shouldn’t install older files that overwrite newer files from the newer updates.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #161940 Reply

          abbodi86
          AskWoody_MVP

          KB4077561 > KB4073576 (AMD fix) > KB4056898 (Security-Only)

          KB4077561 is enough and covers both for Group B (with IE cumulative of course)

          3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #161951 Reply

            MrBrian
            AskWoody_MVP

            Indeed all of the catalog downloads of KB4073576 list KB4077561 as metadata-superseding it.

            Revised comment:

            The best installation order for Windows 8.1 users this month is probably:

            1. KB4077561 (manual installation)

            2. January 2018 Windows monthly rollup or January 2018 Internet Explorer cumulative update

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #162030 Reply

              MrBrian
              AskWoody_MVP

              Another revision:

              The best installation order for Windows 8.1 users this month is probably:

              1. KB4077561 (manual installation). Make sure before installing KB4077561 that this registry item has been set by your antivirus (if you use antivirus).

              2. January 2018 Windows monthly rollup (through Windows Update, not manually, to ensure that the registry item mentioned in step 1 is present) or January 2018 Internet Explorer cumulative update.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #162005 Reply

        MrBrian
        AskWoody_MVP
    • #162037 Reply

      PKCano
      Da Boss

      1/25/2018

      I have added KB4077561 to the Group B patch list for Win8.1 in AKB2000003.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #162051 Reply

      geekdom
      AskWoody Plus

      Late-to-the-party patch: KB4074906 Fix-it tool .NET Framework 4.7.1

      It appeared late yesterday afternoon.

      What is it and what does it do?

      G{ot backup} TestBeta On hiatus.
      Offline▸ Win7Pro • SP1 • x64 • InUse
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    • #162071 Reply

      WildBill
      AskWoody Plus

      Looks like KB4074906 is a fix for Windows 7 SP1 & Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1, according to MrBrian’s 1st link. Since I have Windows 8.1, that’s why I don’t see it. Under Recommended patches, I see KB4033369, .NET Framework for 4.7.1. Clicking on Details shows this: “The Microsoft .NET Framework 4.7.1 is a highly compatible, in-place update for all the previous versions of .NET Framework 4.X. After you install this update, you may have to restart your computer.” (Italics mine.)

      As Woody strongly suggests, I leave Recommended patches unchecked. On my machine, the 2 I leave unchecked every month are KB2976978 (the “Compatibility Update”, supposedly needed to upgrade to Win 10) & KB3080149 (Telemetry update). If no specific warnings apply like the above, I usually apply Recommended as well as Important updates. Recommended hasn’t bitten me before… or at least lately.

      Windows 8.1, 64-bit, back in Group A... & leaning toward Windows 10 V2004. As long as it's a Lot Less Buggy!
      Wild Bill Rides Again...

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #162091 Reply

        MrBrian
        AskWoody_MVP

        “As Woody strongly suggests, I leave Recommended patches unchecked”

        Group A installs Recommended updates that are ticked by default, unless Woody says not to for a specific update. Group B doesn’t install Recommended updates.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #162112 Reply

          WildBill
          AskWoody Plus

          “As Woody strongly suggests, I leave Recommended patches unchecked” Group A installs Recommended updates that are ticked by default, unless Woody says not to for a specific update. Group B doesn’t install Recommended updates.

          I guess I’m still in Group A, but I don’t default Recommended updates anymore, thanks to the 2 I mentioned above. And since the Preview Rollups for the upcoming month are Optional, I don’t touch them either.

          Windows 8.1, 64-bit, back in Group A... & leaning toward Windows 10 V2004. As long as it's a Lot Less Buggy!
          Wild Bill Rides Again...

    • #163490 Reply

      anonymous

      this morning at 3 am microsoft put 3 nasty updates on my machine…I got rid of one, but am unable to uninstall, delete, restore to an earlier time, or remove in safe mode the security patches kb4038777  or  kb4041681…I am running windows 7 and the computer ran fine until 3 am today, January 31, 2018…

      any help would help this non techie person alot…

      thank you

      • #163500 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        kb4038777 is the September 2017 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Win7.
        kb4041681 is the October 2017 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Win7.

        These are normal monthly patches released through Windows Update. They should be uninstallable.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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