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  • MS-DEFCON 2: Still waiting on results for the Win10 cumulative updates

    Home Forums AskWoody blog MS-DEFCON 2: Still waiting on results for the Win10 cumulative updates

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      • #227017 Reply
        woody
        Da Boss

        Patch Lady Susan Bradley says she managed to get all of the October patches installed without incident. I’m still waiting on reports about the massive
        [See the full post at: MS-DEFCON 2: Still waiting on results for the Win10 cumulative updates]

        8 users thanked author for this post.
      • #227020 Reply
        PKCano
        Da Boss

        I still haven’t seen a CHECKED Oct Rollup for Win7. Don’t even see an UNCHECKED Oct Rollup for Win7 unless I do a bunch of finagling.

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #227047 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          I’m showing KB 4462923 UNCHECKED and it’s been that way since the second Tues. of Oct. Also I’m still confused about KB 3177467 v1 versus v2. If I have v1 is that all I need, or do I have to get v2. I installed v1, I believe, back in Oct. of 2016.

          • #227051 Reply
            PKCano
            Da Boss

            You are going to need KB3177467 v2 as well.

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #227052 Reply
              anonymous
              Guest

              Thank You

            • #227066 Reply
              Demeter
              AskWoody Plus

              Win 7 Pro x64 SP1, Grp. A, i7core, Haswell, HP Zbook.  Installed SSU KB3177467 on 10/01/2018 so am assuming it was v1 and will have to install v2 prior to doing any Oct. patching. Checking MS Update catalog I see 3 KB3177467 security updates listed for  Win 7 x64 systems: Windows Embedded Standard  for x64 based systems, Windows Server 2008 R2 for x64 based systems, and Windows 7 x64 based systems. Which of these is for my system?

              • #227071 Reply
                PKCano
                Da Boss

                Your system is “Windows 7 x64 based systems.” Be sure the description says x64 b/c there is one there for x86 (32-bit) as well, and it may not have the x86 designation in the description.

                2 users thanked author for this post.
              • #227093 Reply
                anonymous
                Guest

                The one dated the 8th or the one dated the 10th ?

              • #227096 Reply
                PKCano
                Da Boss

                The one dated 2018. The other one (v1) is dated 2016).

                1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #227078 Reply
              Mr. Natural
              AskWoody Plus

              Oh boy…..it’s deja vu all over again.  🙁

              Red Ruffnsore reporting from the front lines.

              3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #227195 Reply
              OldBiddy
              AskWoody Plus

              In some posts Woody was saying that if you have v.1 that you shouldn’t need v.2. Is there consensus now that v.2 is necessary prior to installing October updates? On my system v.1 was installed back in 2016. Also the October security roll up has been pulled and is not showing at all.

              • #227202 Reply
                PKCano
                Da Boss

                The Oct Rollup has not been pulled, it is just hidden. See #227057 for an explanation of how it shows up (but UNCHECKED so far).

                1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #227252 Reply
                OldBiddy
                AskWoody Plus

                Thanks to @pkcano and anonymous for clarifying the v.1/v.2 confusion for me. I guess best to just wait for the DEFCON status to change before doing anything yet.

              • #227220 Reply
                anonymous
                Guest

                OldBiddy, the inconsistency is in the point of view. Woody’s POV says -v2 is not needed yet because Woody has not advised to apply the October updates yet. Your POV is trying to understand something that Woody has not yet written.

                Two paths are available. Wait for Woody to give his usual thorough directions in his own time; or follow usual patterns to update without MS-DEFCON approved directions.

                Others have posted many times that -v2 is needed. PKCano is holding back from giving that an ‘official’ blessing.

                3 users thanked author for this post.
              • #227226 Reply
                PKCano
                Da Boss

                I believe v2 will be a prerequisite in the future because it is classified as a “Security” update where v1 was optional. And I think Windows Update will look for that.

                But I am not an MS expert and cannot accurately predict what they intend.

                4 users thanked author for this post.
              • #227595 Reply
                Bill C.
                AskWoody Plus

                I did notice that the Belarc Advisor on my machine shows the yet to be installed KB3177467 v2 as a “Critical Security Update,” whereas the rest are listed as “Important.”

                1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #227077 Reply
          pmcjr6142
          AskWoody Plus

          Ditto for my Win 7×64 PC.   The Oct. monthly security rollup is Important but unchecked and the .Net Framework Rollup is Optional and unchecked.  I assume we will skip these updates?

          • #227080 Reply
            PKCano
            Da Boss

            Don’t make that assumption yet. Microsoft may yet change things again. It’s still over two weeks to the next Patch Tuesday!

            4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #227023 Reply
        Susan Bradley
        AskWoody MVP

        I don’t install anything other than the main updates installed on the second week.  I don’t “seek” updates, I just install the second week and ignore anything else.  If you don’t seek updates — at least right now — I’m not getting the second cumulative update installed.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #227046 Reply
          woody
          Da Boss

          Ditto here. I’m not getting the second round of Win10 cumulative updates because I’m not clicking Check for Updates.

          3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #227229 Reply
            ch100
            AskWoody_MVP

            This seems to be the new Win 10 implementation for Optional updates.
            Although this does not explain how Silverlight is offered.
            According to my testing, WUMT shows Silverlight as available, but even clicking on Check for updates, does not get if offered or installed. I might have to do further testing to understand this better, when time allows.

          • #227267 Reply
            anonymous
            Guest

            Also if you DO click but have chosen for semi annual, you’ll luckily also not see them. In that case you get ‘only’ the monthly updates. Which are already more then enough reasons to worry imo.

        • #227481 Reply
          ashfan212
          AskWoody Lounger

          Hi Susan,

          Windows 7 x64 Home Premium. I had written a long description of my experience in your recent topic thread regarding your ability to install the Windows 7 October monthly rollup.

          Briefly, I had already installed all October updates with the exception of SSU – V2 and KB4462923 (unchecked). Once I hid KB4462923, WU offered me SSU – V2, which was installed successfully. Then, when I unhid KB4462923 and WU re-checked for updates, the October monthly rollup was still offered as uncheked. However, after I rebooted (even though WU never prompted me to do so upon the installation of SSU – V2), then KB4462923 was offered by WU as important AND checked. I was then able to install KB4462923 successfully.

          I did have some rebooting issues in which my computer was frozen on the “Preparing to…” message. I speculated that a recent installation of KB3172605 caused the computer freezing during the reboot process. Therefore, I had decided to uninstall KB3172605 prior to the successful installation of KB4462923. After an initial freeze, I starting to once again see the “percentage update status message” when my computer powered back up after the installation of KB4462923.

          If you had any thoughts as to whether the installation of KB3172605 only recently was the cause of my computer not rebooting on its own, I would be most appreciative. Otherwise, my personal experience was that rebooting my computer after having installed SSU – V2 caused WU to offer me the October monthly rollup as checked and important – upon which that update did install successfully.

      • #227024 Reply
        Ed
        AskWoody Lounger

        There’s well over 2 weeks remaining yet before the next batch-o-c**p comes down the M$ chute so no need to rush on opening that gate just yet!

        R-E-L-A-X Woody… take deep breaths!

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #227025 Reply
        zero2dash
        AskWoody Lounger

        With deferrals on quality updates set to 14 days, my 1709 machines grabbed the (1st) cumulative update KB4462918 (released on patch Tuesday) yesterday, along with the MS Flash update KB4462930. So far, no issues. Everything seems to be working just the same as it was the day before. Obviously YMMV

      • #227026 Reply
        geekdom
        AskWoody Plus

        Windows 7 updates. No changes in catalog dates.

        Currently shown in catalog, x86 (32-bit), x64 (64-bit):

        KB4462923 last updated 10/15/2018:
        https://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=4462923

        KB3177467 last updated 10/8/2018:
        https://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/search.aspx?q=3177467

        G{ot backup} TestBeta
        offline▸ Win7Pro SP1 x64 InUse
        online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.752 x64 i5-9400 RAM8GB HDD Firefox75.0 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #227034 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Woody

        I am a little confused.  I am running Windows 7 on my laptop.  Should I wait to update or is it OK to run the updates?

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #227038 Reply
          Microfix
          Da Boss

          Keep an eye on the MS-DEFCON indicator at the top of the page, when it switches to 3 or 4 it will be safe to patch.
          Instructions will then be given on methodology of patching, just in case there are any pitfalls!

          Win7 Pro x86/x64 | Win8.1 Pro x64 | Linux Hybrids x86/x64 |
          4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #227055 Reply
        John
        AskWoody Lounger

        Stuff for 1803 seems OK, haven’t experienced anything. Most definitely want to avoid 1809 for the time being. That release needs a few months of exorcising the bugs first.

      • #227057 Reply
        PKCano
        Da Boss

        Information on Win7 2018-10 Rollup KB4462923 See #227020 above.

        In a Win7 test VM:
        + Initially offered KB4092483 (Office 2010), KB4022138 (PP Viewer), KB4459922 (2018-10 .NET Rollup), KB890830 (MSRT) – Installed 4 updates, rebooted.
        + Offered KB3177467 v2 (10/09/2018) CHECKED important update – Installed, no reboot required.
        + Check for updates – no important updates offered. Offered  UNCHECKED optional updates KB4462927 (2018-10 Preview Rollup for Win7), KB4462500 (2018-10 .NET Preview)
        + Hid KB4462927 (2018-10 Preview Rollup for Win7), checked for updates – no important updates offered. Offered  UNCHECKED optional updates KB4457139 (2018-09 Preview Rollup for Win7)
        + Hid KB4457139 (2018-09 Preview Rollup for Win7), checked for updates – offered UNCHECKED important update KB4462923 (2018-10 Rollup for Win7).

        KB4457139 (2018-09 Preview) did not show up in the hidden updates. I unhid KB4462927 (2018-10 Preview) and KB4462923 (2018-10 Rollup) remained as an UNCHECKED important update, even after rebooting.

        Now that’s finagling!

        8 users thanked author for this post.
      • #227063 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        The seemingly conflicting patch advice/recommendations presented on this site since Susan Bradley joined the crew can be confusing, obviously is contradictory and perhaps needlessly laying the foundation for an avoidable widespread patching failure among users of this site.

        It is my opinion, Woody and Susan need to get together and decide which of them is going to announce patch readiness.

        Opinions are fine, personal experience with particular patches on one’s own system(s) is fine as long as it is denoted as being a preliminary observation and may not be actual advice for someone else to go ahead and do the same.

        I like the Woody’s DEFCON system. I appreciate his air of cautious skepticism and his apparent focus on the average home Windows based computer user. Susan’s business/IT focus and seeming greater degree of risk acceptance (perhaps justified for those operating environments), I do not think blends well on this site, that I assume receives very few business/IT system administrator visits.

        Two planes heading to the same destination on different courses, a crash is inevitable unless there is one controller per frequency issuing instructions.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #227097 Reply
          woody
          Da Boss

          Thanks for the observation.

          A big part of the problem is that I need to make it clear that there are two different groups of AskWoody readers — those who want it simple (and cautious) vs. those who are willing to wade through the details., and take a few extra chances.

          We have a big change coming to the site, although I haven’t figured out what the change will entail.

          Once I have the framework figured out, this will be one of the first pieces I’ll tackle.

          Hang in there. If you need to keep your network updated, and don’t mind working through some rough spots, take Susan’s advice. If you want to stay easy and cautious, follow the ms defcon rating.

          12 users thanked author for this post.
          • #227139 Reply
            anonymous
            Guest

            At one time I was firmly planted in Group B.  But after I migrated to Linux and consigned Windows to existence in virtual machines I switched over to Group A.  It’s a bit easier, and I’m not worried about Microsoft snooping on virtual machines in which I don’t conduct any personal business.

          • #227250 Reply
            redknight
            AskWoody Plus

            Also, another observation if I may.  There are three groups of people on this site looking for guidance – Win 7, Win 8, Win 10.  I am Win 7.  I think there needs to be some delineation among the three groups.  Patching instructions and DEFCON seem to bunch everyone together and it is unclear which group is being addressed which can be confusing.  My machines are Win 7.  I have no interest in Win 8 or Win 10.  I come here for instructions and guidance for Win 7.  The waters get really muddy at times when a thread is not specific to one OS and you’re trying to figure out which OS is being discussed, sometimes all three OS’s are in a thread and sometimes even Linux or Mac.  You have to read a long thread and pick out what is pertinent to your OS.  And even then, there are different views.

            Your post above, #227048 is a bit troubling (no idea about Win 7 updates).  What then am I to do?  I gather from other posts that 3177467 v2 is needed and seems safe to install.  That is the only patch that has been offered for a couple of weeks.  And that 4462923 will not be offered until I install 3177467 v2.  I wait until the Saturday before Patch Tuesday to patch provided DEFCON is 3 or higher

            Perhaps this site has grown beyond one-size-fits-all and needs to be more granular so as to not be so confusing at times.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #227253 Reply
              PKCano
              Da Boss

              If you WAIT until the DEFCON number is 3 or above, Woody will publish an article in ComputerWorld with safe patching instructions for each of the versions of Windows.

              4 users thanked author for this post.
            • #227257 Reply
              DrBonzo
              AskWoody Plus

              @redknight – The great majority of confusion is because of Microsoft, not the askwoody site.

              My machines are Win 7 also, and I have no interest in Win 8, 8.1, or 10 other than that reading about their [issues] can actually be very entertaining at times (not to make light of the trouble users of those OSs endure).

              Every month when a new set of updates come out, I make a list of the ones that apply to me and write them down and then memorize the last 4 digits of each. It’s not that hard as there are usually only 3 or so updates that I want/need. That way I can filter out what’s relevant to me as a skim through threads. I will note, though, that typically the great majority of useful info about Win 7 will be found in just a small handful of threads, which threads I will usually bookmark.

              The whole thing is a process and a waiting game. I usually don’t have a firm “game plan” until a couple days before I install patches, and I usually wait to install until a few days after Woody announces Defcon 3 or higher.

              Is it a pain in the neck? Is it a waste of my time? Do I wish I could just install the patches the day they come out? A resounding YES to all those questions. Unfortunately life just isn’t that clean and simple in the patch world of MS. I put up with it because for a variety of reasons I have to. But when EOL for Win 7 comes in about 14 months, my machines will no longer be on the internet and will be used for just a few specialty things. No big deal since I already have an iMAC and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS in regular use.

              If/when you are sick of it all, just follow PKCano’s advice above!

              3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #227102 Reply
          Arvy
          AskWoody Lounger

          I suppose it depends on whether one regards specific information about one experience with “an entire office full of HP workstations” as constituting advice that actually contradicts and conflicts with Woody’s DEFCON level and cautionary recommendation for users in general. Subject to correction by the authors themselves, I don’t think that was their intention.

          Asus ROG Maximus XI Code board; Intel i9-9900K CPU; 32 GB DDR4-3600 RAM; Nvidia GTX1080 GPU; 2x512 GB Samsung 970 Pro M.2 NVMe; 2x2 TB Samsung 860 Pro SSDs; Windows 10.1809; Linux Mint 19.1; Terabyte Backup & Recovery
          • #227133 Reply
            geekdom
            AskWoody Plus

            Information here is made available regarding patches, versions, pitfalls, and advisories. Determine your skill set, your needs, and patch accordingly.

            G{ot backup} TestBeta
            offline▸ Win7Pro SP1 x64 InUse
            online▸ Win10Pro 1909.18363.752 x64 i5-9400 RAM8GB HDD Firefox75.0 Windows{Image/Defender/Firewall}
            3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #227106 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          There is a big difference between the two environments here.

          Susan is mainly working with Businesses. They have the advantage of Servers more or less acting as a buffer for the updates. They also have multiple machines, so test PC(s) are available. But with the volume, they are up against a timetable.

          Woody is dealing with the consumer in general, who may have 1-2 machines. If those users jump ahead and use their machines for testing, the consequences are a lot higher. (Lose the use of the PC, don’t know how t fix it themselves)  Thus the extra need for caution by waiting a bit longer.

          13 users thanked author for this post.
          • #227117 Reply
            Susan Bradley
            AskWoody MVP

            I’m not Enterprise, I’m Windows 10 1803 pro, Windows 7 at a small business.  I do not use registry cleaners.  I don’t install more than one a/v on my systems (and I stay away from Avast that has historically had issues with early feature releases of Windows 10.  I do make sure that machines are on Pro so one can push off feature releases and even security updates.  I do ensure that I have backups on every workstations (yes even in the office) so that should something go wrong, I can recover.  If I don’t have trust in my backup/recovery – even at home – I can’t recover from ransomware.  So if you don’t trust that you can’t recover from a bad patch, then you can’t recover from anything.  The first rule of technology — in ANY situation home – or office – is if you don’t trust that you can’t recover from anything bad whether that bad thing is patches or an attack, then you aren’t in a good place.  My comment about a fleet full of HP is due to the BSOD’s on some HP models that had issues with a driver that was installed.  That driver didn’t get installed on my machines Lastly, I think the other rule of windows 10 is NEVER EVER EVER GO SEARCHING FOR UPDATES.   Searchers get previews of updates, they get drivers, they get microcode updates.  Don’t do the Windows 7 era “searching for updates” on a Windows 10 machine.

            Susan Bradley Patch Lady

            8 users thanked author for this post.
          • #227116 Reply
            anonymous
            Guest

            Good point Arvy. I’m not suggesting that either Susan or Woody is intentionally muddling the advice waters. I read this site everyday and am perfectly capable of choosing whose advice recommendations I should follow. I’m pretty computer savvy and I can tell the difference between a fix that is needed imminently or a fix that I can safely delay for a month or longer based on how I use my system(s).
            There are lots of links to this site from articles published elsewhere such as Computerworld. People directed here from those articles or by recommendations from friends and colleagues, may or may not take the time to read enough posts to be in the same position to differentiate the different focus or emphasis put forward by the two primaries. Those with the ability to defer updates  should be in a position to understand the risks or potential pitfalls if you will of updating today or in two weeks time. However, reading some of these divergent posts out of context could conceivably lead someone to update when there really is no pressing need to do so and the chances of any given patch removing their network card, entering a boot loop or deleting their files, is not close enough to zero for most people’s tastes.
            My original observation was merely to point out that a mixed message is being presented and the authors appear to be assuming that the reader understands and can sort the wheat from the chaff using a posting history and self declared emphasis that the reader may not have actually read or been asked to read before committing to any apparent piece of advice or recommendation.
            My point has been brought to the forefront and I am sure that in due course both primaries will take steps to ensure that the causal readers of this site understand who is writing to which targeted audience.

            Edit to remove HTML. Please use the “Text” tab in the entry box when you copy/paste.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #227144 Reply
          ch100
          AskWoody_MVP

          The site and discussions here are useful to everyone, including IT administrators at all levels, but should not be seen as the only source of information for them.
          However I agree that it may be misleading at times to the casual administrator browsing and not understanding the context.
          Susan’s advice is targeted mainly to the small business, while the bigger enterprise administrators are supposed to be able to make up their mind and decide based on their own judgement.

          4 users thanked author for this post.
          • #227247 Reply
            Susan Bradley
            AskWoody MVP

            And many of them have their own patch deadlines that they are mandated to do via policy or PCI/DSS etc.

            Susan Bradley Patch Lady

            2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #228300 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          I find that Susan’s contributions actually make things clearer and easier.  If we are at Defcon-1 because of Windows 10 1809 wiping people’s files out, for example, that has NOTHING to do with my Windows 7 machines.  Susan’s patch list allows me to evaluate what I am actually being offered on a product by product basis.  It is an enormous help.

          • #228306 Reply
            PKCano
            Da Boss

            Actually, there were problems with 1803 bluescreens, 1809 long list, and Win7 Rollup still an unchecked update.

            Susan deals with a business environment: large number of machines, test PC’s available, backups are made, on a timetable to get patched, often behind servers, and certain other restrictions. She tests ahead of time, and if there is a problem, well, it’s a test, and she has the skills to fix what’s broken.

            That’s a completely different environment than the home user. How many test machines does the home user have when there is only one PC? Does the average user have an image backup, know how t fix a problem if it occurs, even know how to find out what the problem is? So there is a bit more caution – that is the reason for Woody’s DEFCON System.

        • #228533 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          My take is that Woody looks at the entire hay stack.  In contrast, the Patch Lady looks at the individual straws.  For several years, I’ve found them both to be valid app0roaches and have had no problems with either one.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #228554 Reply
            Bluetrix
            AskWoody MVP

            My take is that Woody looks at the entire hay stack. In contrast, the Patch Lady looks at the individual straws. For several years, I’ve found them both to be valid app0roaches and have had no problems with either one.

            I couldn’t agree more. It’s not like one is CNN and the other is Fox, they both have the best interest of computer users in mind. Whether either uses the holistic or heuristic approach, in the end they seem to agree that keeping us informed is their main goal.

      • #227081 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        As I said before, I didn’t get the Group A October update for Windows 7 until I hid the Software Removal Tool. It seems to be an exclusive update.

        I already have the service stack update.

      • #227085 Reply
        Bluetrix
        AskWoody MVP

        Patch Lady Susan Bradley says she managed to get all of the October patches installed without incident. I’m still waiting on reports about the massive[See the full post at: MS-DEFCON 2: Still waiting on results for the Win10 cumulative updates]

        I am on a mission that I was told can’t be done on Windows10 Home Edition. I am attempting to block any Windows updating until I feel ready to update. Of course this means I am at dire risk, maybe not. I know the pitfalls and what not to do that would invite disaster. Have full back-ups, sole user and  my AV and Firewall are utd.  Screen shot of programs dashboard included.

        Installed 10/21/2018, so not conclusive if it works or not … yet.  Version 1803xxx165 and holding. Will keep y’all informed.

        Stop-Updates-W10-Home

         

        Attachments:
        • #227099 Reply
          woody
          Da Boss
        • #227170 Reply
          SteveTree
          AskWoody Lounger

          I am on a mission that I was told can’t be done on Windows10 Home Edition. I am attempting to block any Windows updating until I feel ready to update.  

          I’ve only been aware of this for a short time but it worked for me this month.

          WuMgr (Windows Update Manager)

          Make sure you explore the tabs to learn how to block update. At this stage I am not confident enough that it protects Windows ‘helpfully’ switching the update service back on. So I am still using Windows Update Blocker in conjunction. The update service blocked and protected seems to stop Windows from switching it back on.

          When ready to update

          1) WUB – switch to Enable.

          2) Run WuMgr (check for updates, hide unwanted updates, install wanted updates)

          3) WUB – Disable service with Protected checked.

          NOTE: There are instruction to add other Services to WUB blocking. I found it unnecessary (made no difference to update blocking or performance on a very low spec. machine).

          Make sure you check downloads via Virustotal.com before use (my paranoia about potential website hijack).

           

          Group A (but Telemetry disabled Tasks and Registry)
          Win 7 64 Pro desktop
          Win 10 64 Home portable

      • #227111 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        FWIW I pushed the Windows 7 and .NET updates out to my organization via WSUS and I’ve seen no ill effects on anything.

      • #227130 Reply
        Bluetrix
        AskWoody MVP

        Yes, it can be done. See https://www.computerworld.com/article/3138088/microsoft-windows/woodys-win10tip-block-forced-win10-updates.html

        Okay Woody, I concede you partially (poor choice of words) win this round. I am the odd man out when it comes to Microsoft’s Windows10 Home. I am not a standard Windows “do as they say user.”  I gutted Cortana, I  don’t use Windows Outlook email, I do not ever open IE. I have rid my machine of  One Drive and do not have a Microsoft account. I know I am leaving other things out I have either deleted or just do not use at all. To me Windows is only an OS, with some neat built in progs, such as Paint, nothing more. I’ve had this discussion in my 1st post. Other than the metered trick both WiFi and Ethernet, the replies mostly said “sorry, you are out of luck” (paraphrased of course)  Told I couldn’t use the GPedit I installed because it most likely wouldn’t work anyway because I had the Home Edition. In the link you provided only 2 things could possibly stall for a while the updates, one being a 2 prong registry edit to extend deferral and the other one I actually found humorous:

        “Step 4B (recommended): Give up already. Life’s too short to futz with all this stuff. Buy a Wi-Fi dongle, stick it in your computer, and use Wi-Fi for your internet connection. Yes, it’s slower. Yes, it takes up a USB port. But think of all the hassle you’ll save.”

        Should you or anyone care to have a look-see at what I am trying, and it is considered total fodder in the minds of those who forgot more than I will ever know about Windows, I will humbly bow to the mighty Microsoft. I won’t like it, but I will. If the program I am trying, works … think of the hassle I will save 🙂

        btw, I had meter selected (both) and I still got upgraded to 1803. <shrug>

        Bluetrix <——— ducks

         

        • #227153 Reply
          woody
          Da Boss

          Yep, that’s part of the obsolete portion of the article (as @b notes).

          You have three choices for blocking updates with a Win10 Home machine:

          1> Set your internet connection to metered (possible with Ethernet since 1709, if memory serves)

          2> Use a third party program, of which there are now many

          3> Disable wsuaserv, the Windows Update service

          I don’t like options 2 and 3, for various reasons, and 1 doesn’t always work.

        • #227276 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          As I’ve posted previously, there is another option:

          There is a guaranteed way to stop W10 Home updates/upgrades, block/disconnect network access.

          This obviously works best if:

          • Your machine dual boots (e.g. Linux or an older version of Windows)
          • Runs W10 as a VM
          • You have another machine with a sane OS installed on it

          After my W10 Home laptop and W10 Pro VM repeatedly failed to “upgrade” from 1703 to 1709, I disconnected them from our network.

          They’ve run flawlessly ever since.

          -lehnerus2000

          • #228555 Reply
            EP
            AskWoody_MVP

            disabling the wuauserv service alone in Win10 works temporarily as there are some related WU tasks in taskschd.msc that actually re-enable the wuauserv service later on; so it’s not a permanent solution

      • #227534 Reply
        Chris B
        AskWoody Plus

        I fear that those of us who are calling for Microsoft to improve the quality control of its patching process are probably doomed. Yesterday Microsoft became the second most valuable company in the world, after Amazon and Google stumbled. That was on the back of results showing strong profits from their cloud services and their PC business, which is effectively a monopoly. Faced with the blaze of appreciation from the market that these results produced, the chances of their management being remotely interested in our complaints about revenue free maintenance of what they probably regard as a legacy product are vanishingly small.

        There is no effective competition in the PC OS market. At the beginning of last century our predecessors saw the results of that, e.g. in the US oil market, and did something about it. As has often been said, those who do not read the lessons of history are condemned to repeat its mistakes.

        Chris
        Win 10 Pro x64 Group A

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #227715 Reply
          Charlie
          AskWoody Plus

          I wonder how many current MS employees know that it was the advent of small affordable Personal Computers, and the need for a good operating system for them that made Microsoft in the first place.  Paul Allen convinced Bill Gates to quit Harvard and the two of them made DOS for IBM’s first PC’s.  From there the two became billionaires as things progressed.  Things seem to be very different now.

          Win 7 Still Alive, x64, Intel i3-2120 3.3GHz, Linux Mint 19.1

          • #227730 Reply
            anonymous
            Guest

            Essentially true, but skips a couple steps. I hope this is not seen as a correction so much as additional information.

            There was a very small market for IBM-compatible, or IBM-clones among the early personal computers. Microsoft started out with an interpreter language for Altair computers in the desert town of Albuquerque. Only after several more steps in evolution was IBM proper convinced this upstart disk operating system was suitable for their use.

            A small point of history today. A fascinating time to be alive and observe from a distance. Still harboring a small amount of jealously from not being closer to the action. Working on that as a life goal.

          • #228156 Reply
            anonymous
            Guest

            A few days ago I looked up where MS makes its money (sorry, don’t have the link available at the moment) and guess what? ‘Windows\OS’ was at the bottom of the five or so different income streams they showed by a rather large margin.

            Times have changed and it appears MS now makes most of its money from services.

            I expect MS as it exists today considers Windows not much more than a huge pain in the keester, a major nuisance. I would not be the least bit surprised to see MS spin off the ‘Windows\OS’ functions into a separate standalone company or something similar so they no longer have to deal with this monthly nightmare of updates.

      • #228174 Reply
        Bluetrix
        AskWoody MVP

        That makes sense, they “gave” away Win10.

        Hard to make money that way.

      • #228316 Reply
        Bill C.
        AskWoody Plus

        Interestingly, these updating issues appear to be getting more coverage. I just received the AskLeo.com email newsletter by Leo Notenboom with the subject line, Ask Leo! #728 – Microsoft, We Deserve Better.

        He topics included this one that is on his website: Microsoft, We Deserve Better – Updates to Windows seemingly can’t be trusted, and yet they’re forced on us. Something must change. https://askleo.com/microsoft-we-deserve-better/#comment-615613

        I recently even read an article in the Washington Post that touched upon the MS update issue. Unfortunately, I can not locate it, either online or in the newspaper recycling bin.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
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