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  • MS-DEFCON 3: Time to patch, but be aware of Network-busting bugs in Win7

    Home Forums AskWoody blog MS-DEFCON 3: Time to patch, but be aware of Network-busting bugs in Win7

    This topic contains 189 replies, has 57 voices, and was last updated by  HiFlyer 4 days, 9 hours ago.

    • Author
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    • #195637 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Full description coming in Computerworld, but for those of you who have been following along here, the road to installing May’s patches is relatively
      [See the full post at: MS-DEFCON 3: Time to patch, but be aware of Network-busting bugs in Win7]

    • #195640 Reply

      PKCano
      AskWoody MVP

      Since I do early testing, I will share my results.

      I have updated 4 Win7 in VMs and 4 in hardware installations without problems. 3 are 32-bit, the rest 64-bit. 3 are Home, the rest are a combination of Pro and Ultimate. One of the hardware installations is Group B.

      I have updated 4 Win8.1 in VMs without problems. One is 32-bit.

      I have updated 2 Win10 Pro 1703 in VMs (mine) to Build 15063.1088 without problems. I have also updated 2 1703  Pro hardware installations belonging to people I support, one to 15063.1088 and one to 15063.1112 – and this time I did not have to fight the upgrade to 1709 or 1803.

      I have updated 1 Win10 Pro 1709 in VM to Build 16299.431 without problems. I have not been offered Build 16299.461 (last time I looked).

      This is not to say there aren’t problems out there, and not to tell you that you won’t see them. But to tell you there is a reasonable chance that updating will be successful.
      Watch out for your anti-virus – it might be a good idea to disable it if you are updating Win10.

    • #195639 Reply

      anonymous

      Thanks Woody, as always.

    • #195643 Reply

      anonymous

      “1803 now powers 50% of all Win10 machines”

      As said above, very likely untrue, but possibly 50% of all telemetry now comes from 1803 as those who have updated are the ones least likely to know how to control telemetry.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195647 Reply

      anonymous

      From another thread from Noel Carboni:

      “Well, according to SFC my Windows 10 v1709 build 16299.461 installation in my VM has (again) corrupted itself, and none of the typical repair mechanisms fix it. I barely use this VM for anything. I don’t think it’s too much to hope that an operating system shouldn’t make itself unserviceable.

      I’m sure Microsoft would say that v1803 is here to save the day, and point out that if it were to be “accidentally” installed it would fix this issue handily. Until the next time.

      This constant self-corruption sure makes me weary, especially since we could see it coming SO long ago from SO far away…”

      Does this indicate that updating to 16299.461 is still a bad idea?

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #195649 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        Win10 v1709 has had it’s problems. But Noel does WAY more tweaking that the average person. So his results may not be an example of what you find.
        Win 10 v1709 seems to have stabilized in the last month or so, unfortunately too late for those wanting to upgrade from v1703 but not wanting the disaster of v1803 in its infancy.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #195651 Reply

          anonymous

          Many thanks for your quick reply. Noel did say “I barely use this VM for anything”, but from your comment it looks like no-one else is having any issues. I may well go ahead with this update tomorrow.

          • #195653 Reply

            PKCano
            AskWoody MVP

            It might be a good idea to WAIT until Woody publishes his ComputerWorld article on the Updates. It should be linked tomorrow or Mon morning. He will have comments and warnings on any problems.

            • #195655 Reply

              anonymous

              Ok I’ll wait till then. Many thanks for the advice, and many thanks to Woody and others for putting so much work into this.

        • #195715 Reply

          Noel Carboni
          AskWoody MVP

          For what it’s worth, I’ve done less tweaking on my v1709 VM than in past history, but I don’t think I caused it.

          Do your systems successfully navigate the following command?

          SFC /VERIFYONLY

          If they don’t, do any of the normal means correct it? e.g.,

          SFC /SCANNOW

          or

          DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth

          They didn’t fix it for me, and being able to report “SFC found no problems” is still important to some of us.

          By the way, I facilitated the update to v1803 of a copy of that v1709 VM that would not pass SFC… Now, not surprisingly (since the whole system is updated), it reports no SFC problems:

          1803SFCOK

          I have been doing product testing in v1803, specifically with regard to per-monitor scaling (i.e., where different monitors have different pixel sizes), and there have been some improvements in this area.

          -Noel

          Attachments:
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          • #196079 Reply

            anonymous

            After how long did you find the corruption started?

            I went ahead and updated 1709 to .461 yesterday and ran sfc /verifyonly today. The only corruption it found are ones I created myself – an install of WMC (which uses dism in the installation process) and an old version of explorerframe.dll which I downgraded to remove the annoying gap to the left of the tiles in “This PC”. I will leave it a few days and run sfc again to see if anything else has changed.

            PS: No other apparent issues so far after the update.

    • #195654 Reply

      anonymous

      I just installed my updates with no issues. :3 I kept 1803 hidden and when I unhid the other updates, I didn’t see 1803 in the check for updates thing or that, still in WUShowhide’s hide box. 🙂

      My 1709 is up to date and doing great. 🙂

    • #195659 Reply

      Peacelady
      AskWoody Lounger

      Just installed May rollup – all is well.  GroupA – windows7 Professional Svc Pk1 64 bit Intel (R) Core (TM).  PHEW – WHAT A RELIEF!  Deep heartfelt thanks to Woody and all who walked us through this maze. 🙂

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195661 Reply

      JimS
      AskWoody Lounger

      Windows 7×86 Group A. Just installed May monthly rollup with no issues. Whew. Thanks to all for your never-ending help.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195668 Reply

      StruldBrug
      AskWoody Lounger

      Group B W7 64-bit Home, Realtek PCIe GBE NIC
      Updated May OS security only, IE cumulative, and .Net roll-up package; restarted after each. No NIC problems, nor any other issues occurred.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195672 Reply

      RDRguy
      AskWoody Lounger

      Just finished installing May Win7 (Group B) & IE11 updates, system restart then followed up with Windows Update for .Net, MSRT, Windows Defender & MSOffice 2010 & 2013 updates on all my systems … no issues what-so-ever, all system NICs are Good-To-Go.

      Win7 Group B (Ultimate & Pro) [x64 & x86]
      MSOffice Pro Plus 2010 SP2(x86 Perpetual)
      MSOffice Pro Plus 2013 SP1(x64 Perpetual)
      RDRguy

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195676 Reply

      samak
      AskWoody Lounger

      Maybe a dumb question, but if the workaround for the NIC problem is:
      ” 1. To locate the network device, launch devmgmt.msc; it may appear under Other Devices.
      2. To automatically rediscover the NIC and install drivers, select Scan for Hardware Changes from the Action menu. ”
      wouldn’t you be unable to Scan for Hardware Changes because your NIC is now a BRICK? Or doesn’t the scan need the NIC?

      W7 SP1 Home Premium 64-bit, Office 2010, Group B, non-techie

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #195701 Reply

        GoTheSaints
        AskWoody Lounger

        Not a dumb question samak! Bob99 posted this a few days ago.

         

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #195726 Reply

        anonymous

        samak, the term “bricked” is to mean that the device you have is no longer functional and can not be repaired therefore it is now useless. The remark of being bricked, a new one, is similar to the old “it is now a door stop” comment. The device can not be repaired and is no good and only useful as a brick to hold a door open or doorstop.

        If the device can be repaired it is NOT a brick. So many people now use the word bricked to embellish and sensationalize their story that it is overused.

        If you can uninstall a patch, or rescan for devices, or restore the windows registry and you are up and running then you were not “bricked”.

        Loosing the device driver and it loss of use can easily be regained by reinstalling the driver.

        If the NIC was actually fried with electricity or grossly overheated and ruined so it had to be removed and replaced, then that individual part was “bricked” in your computer.

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #195796 Reply

          anonymous

          Strictly speaking “bricked” also ONLY refers to mobile devices – they have similar size to a brick and when they are unrepairably broken, similar functionality. Using the term for either repairable devices or larger devices (eg a pc) or even parts of a device, like you say is misusing the term 😛

          2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195674 Reply

      anonymous

      1803 installed on its own. Now the display is at full brightness and the controls do nothing. Seems to be a common problem. Tried all the fixes – nothing works.

      • #195893 Reply

        anonymous

        Also after 1803 the keyboard changed to US from UK, and the windows update settings changed from notify. ***** MICROSOFT

    • #195680 Reply

      BobbyB
      AskWoody Lounger

      Win7Pro x86\64 all installed no problems NIC’s Realtek RTL8139/810x and Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller no problems.
      Win8.1 x64 no worries, then again is it ever?
      Win10 1709 Pro x64 still on hold for another few days, at work the other 1709 x64 Machines no problems.
      Win10 Home 1709 x64 (VHDX) no problems despite surviving an attempt to “assimilate” it last week, since hidden and fine as well.
      Time for a large almighty PHEW!!! and another 30 days until the next “Toe curler” lol 😉

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #195697 Reply

        HiFlyer
        AskWoody Lounger

        @bobbyb

        Re:  Your #195680  “Win7Pro x86\64 all installed no problems….”

        SOQU or SMQR? (Gp A or B?)

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #195745 Reply

          BobbyB
          AskWoody Lounger

          @hiflyer actually more of a peculiar, part experience over the years as to what flies and what causes problems, and part convenience. The “Snoop” kb2952664 is avoided as is kb971033 (don’t need to add an activation checker in to the mix when it does nothing else) kb2506143, stops DISM /add-packages CMD dead and I believe its no longer offered thank goodness. But I sort of cheat, well more of a strange way for my System Images for backup and\or clean install. All my .ISO’s are all sysprepped and utilise Win 7 SP2 aka kb3125574 (I believe there’s some Telemetry updates bundled). So not totally “Snoop Free” but its a quicker route, should calamity hit, and a total wipe is Req. along with a reinstall your up and running within the hour and only a handful of updates Req even inc. Office 2010 again only Req. a small number of updates. The thing is Win7 and 8.1 are just so stable and reliable I some times think I wasted my time, well just lately Win7 seems to be attracting more than its fair share of “update Gremlins” although mercifully I have been spared. So alas not sure what Group I would fall in to. Pretty much its by the month just lately with due reference to my rapidly growing scratch card and of course @woody ‘s pages here, but Win’s 7-10 have all the tools, if you have time and patience, to (re)create those special order OEM disks .ISO’s that the OEM’s have on special order for a complete wipe and reinstall where they charge anything from about $40 upwards. You get to choose the contents not the OEM inc Office and applicable Drivers, updated etc. Not the useless “fluff” they seem to bundle with them and on new machines 🙂

          • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by  BobbyB.
          3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #195793 Reply

            Bob99
            AskWoody Lounger

            Thanks for the very elaborate response, @bobbyb . However, I think @hiflyer just wanted to know if you installed the monthly rollup (KB4103718) or the security-only update (KB4103712) for Windows 7 this month. 🙂

            2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #195850 Reply

              BobbyB
              AskWoody Lounger

              @hiflyer @bob99 “am I bad” Sorry folks looks like I misread the question, must be tired eyes staring at reams of update numbers this is the output I get from running the wmic qfe CMD its quicker than wading through WUD installed updates:

              C:\windows\system32>wmic qfe where “HotfixID = ‘KB4103718′” get HotfixID, InstallDate, InstalledBy, InstalledOn
              HotFixID InstallDate InstalledBy InstalledOn
              KB4103718 NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM 6/3/2018

              C:\windows\system32>wmic qfe where “HotfixID = ‘KB4103712′” get HotfixID, InstallDate, InstalledBy, InstalledOn
              No Instance(s) Available.

              Just copy and paste and change the number raises another query but i’ll let that one ride for a while as its “Patch Catch up Weekend” 😉

              • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by  BobbyB.
              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #195865 Reply

              Bob99
              AskWoody Lounger

              Looks to me like you installed KB4103718, the monthly rollup. Looks like no instances of KB4103712, the security-only update, were found.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #195682 Reply

      Ascaris
      AskWoody MVP

      Kind of an unfortunate point for Computerworld to inject a text ad:

      Once you’re back online, take Susan Bradley’s advice:

      [ Got a spare hour? Take this online course and learn how to install and configure Windows 10 with the options you need. ]

      visit the vendor of your computer or the vendor of your network card and update both your bios and network drivers from the vendor’s web site.

      It looks like you’re advising me to take Susan Bradley’s advice to take the online course and learn to install and configure Windows 10!

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195686 Reply

      Joulia.S
      AskWoody Lounger

      Following your ‘ go ahead ‘ Da Boss ‘ i like that title ‘ i went ahead and gave Windows Update the nudge,while sending prayers before,during and afterwards,until my system booted and İnternet working A OK !!! Thanks again Da Boss for your tireless and most valuable advice.

       

      Windows 7,Home Premium 64 bit - Lenovo laptop
      Group A - Intel (R)Core i7 Processors -

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195688 Reply

      anonymous

      Well… I just did the update on my Win 7 home premium PC (group A).

      Not network issues but my PC is now INSANELY slow. Takes over 2 minutes to boot to desktop and a minute to shut down. Takes a long time to open chrome and open files in general. I’m gonna roll back, this just isn’t working out for me!

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #195954 Reply

        anonymous

        Hello Anonymous, I have seen where after doing MS updates (that I do one-by-one), it may take 3 reboots to get the PC to boot at a normal speed again.

        Also, if you installed any .NET updates they have to resort the image and this will slow down a PC. See:  https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/dotnet/2013/08/06/wondering-why-mscorsvw-exe-has-high-cpu-usage-you-can-speed-it-up/

        I have also found that Windows will run “idle tasks” after about 20 minutes of non use. Google “Process Idle Tasks”. Let the PC sit for an hour, and not sleep, so the Idle Tasks will run.

        This has worked for me in the past. I hope it works for you.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195693 Reply

      anonymous

      installed group b patches on both windows 7 x64 and 8.1 x64.

      after reboot i installed latest patches for office 2010, msrt, defender, adobe…
      this month there was also .net patch listed as important, so i installed this too.

      as usually i did NOT install any snooping patches or quality rollups.
      and of course i installed nothing from optional section, as always…

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195698 Reply

      Heavenly
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well… I just did the update on my Win 7 home premium PC (group A). Not network issues but my PC is now INSANELY slow. Takes over 2 minutes to boot to desktop and a minute to shut down. Takes a long time to open chrome and open files in general. I’m gonna roll back, this just isn’t working out for me!

      I did the updates Group A win7 sp1  home premium – all installed ok.

      But after the restart I notice a red notice on the  malwarebytes icon  on  the task bar – opened  it and was had a notice on there telling me that updates were not current, which surprised me because they were updated before I installed the MS updates.

      So I restarted my pc twice more and got the same  problem. So sent an email off to Malwarebytes and closed my pc down. This afternoon I started my pc – no red sign on my icon  opened malwarebytes  and it auto started to update with no problems.

      So all is working fine again  – thank you Woody and Susan Bradley for your work again  – and all the others that take the time to try and help us 🙂

       

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #195729 Reply

        Peacelady
        AskWoody Lounger

        @heavenly
        I had the same red warning from Malwarebytes upon restarting the May Rollup. It would not update. Looked today and it says Updates current. A mystery.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #195787 Reply

          JimS
          AskWoody Lounger

          Yesterday Malwarebytes was doing system maintenance on its updating. That’s why the red warning flag. It went back to normal this morning. MBAM posted it on its forum. Users were not happy about it. It would be nice if Malwarebytes would give some advanced warning.

          • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by  JimS.
          6 users thanked author for this post.
          • #195798 Reply

            anonymous

            That makes sense. I had the same red flag on my MBAM on a machine that hasn’t been updated yet since April.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #195714 Reply

      LeaningTowardsLinux
      AskWoody Lounger

      Like I said on June 1 in #195510 :

      “Just installed KBs 4103712 (Sec.only May) and 4103768 (IE May). Didn’t want to wait any longer.
      No problemos. No NIC issues, nothing.”

      Two days later: no problems detected. Thanks Woody Crew.

      P.S. Actually it was thanks to front running loungers who gave me the guts to go ahead before Defcon 3. Thank you fellow loungers!

      Group B + Windows 7 SP1 x64 + Office 365 C2R + Linux Mint
      • #195736 Reply

        LeaningTowardsLinux
        AskWoody Lounger

        Seeing that most give info about their network adapter:
        I have a ‘Intel Ethernet Connection i2i7-V’ (with a standard Windows driver) and it’s still working fine after the updates.

        Group B + Windows 7 SP1 x64 + Office 365 C2R + Linux Mint
        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #195731 Reply

      JohnW
      AskWoody Lounger

      I updated my main Win10 Pro x64 desktop last weekend from 1703 to 1709.  Only troubles encountered were with two 3rd party applications.  One just needed to be re-installed as it was not starting up correctly, and another needed to be updated to the latest version – that was VirtualBox, a free update to v5.2.12, so no biggie.

      Today I patched my Win 7 Pro x64 box with all of the current May patches, except the ones marked optional.  My network adapter survived OK.  It is a Realtek PCIe GBE that is integrated on my Asus motherboard.  Everything else seems to be working as well.

      I am attempting the update on my Win10 Home x64 laptop from 1607 to 1709 today, for the second time.  It failed for some reason at 75%, and reverted to the old version.  I uninstalled Bitdefender, and activated and updated Windows Defender instead, before attempting again.  Also ensured that all other Win 1607 updates are current.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #195741 Reply

        HiFlyer
        AskWoody Lounger

        @johnw #195731   “Today I patched my Win 7 Pro x64 box with all of the current May patches, except the ones marked optional.”

        SOQU or SMQR?  (Gp A or B?)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #195776 Reply

          JohnW
          AskWoody Lounger

          SOQU or SMQR?  (Gp A or B?)

          Not sure what those acronyms represent.  I am not in any group that I am aware of, I always load all checked patches (I just skip the optional patches) after the all clear is given, and a new disk image has been taken.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #195795 Reply

            Bob99
            AskWoody Lounger

            @hiflyer just wants to know if you installed the monthly rollup (KB4103718) or the security-only update (KB4103712) for this month.

            Strange looking abbreviations if you haven’t seen the titles of the updates spelled out repeatedly before. SOQU and SMQR don’t match any currently-used title given to the updates by Microsoft, but they used to stand for Security Monthly Quality Rollup (hence the use of SMQR) and Security Only Update, but I don’t know how SOQU came about, since there’s no Q in the title, nor has there ever been to the best of my knowledge.

            Microsoft has gotten tired of spelling it all out as well, so the current titles (for May at least) are “Monthly Rollup” and “Security-only update”, straight from the security bulletins about them. 🙂

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #195853 Reply

              Jan K.
              AskWoody Lounger

              … but I don’t know how SOQU came about, since there’s no Q in the title

              The Q in SMQR is also debatable…

              4 users thanked author for this post.
            • #195856 Reply

              Bob99
              AskWoody Lounger

              The Q in SMQR is also debatable…

               

               

              A big AMEN to that!! 😉  VERY debatable!!

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #195880 Reply

              StruldBrug
              AskWoody Lounger

              These acronyms represent the titles that are still used in the MS catalog.

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #195886 Reply

              HiFlyer
              AskWoody Lounger

              These acronyms represent the titles that are still used in the MS catalog.

              Yep.  Just wanted know which update for May was installed,  should have been more clear.   sorry.

              SMQR (Smacker or Smucker – rhymes with Sucker)  and SOQU  (Soaku)

              When M$ began this rollup update nonsense every other thing had the gratuitous “Q” added in the name (ala 1984 Big Brother doublespeak “War is Peace”).

              Thanks to all who joined in.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #195904 Reply

              HiFlyer
              AskWoody Lounger

              195880

              “These acronyms represent the titles that are still used in the MS catalog.”

              And still shown this month as SMQR (spelled out) in Windows Update.

              See:    Charlie #195764 screenshot (below) this page.

              “Security Monthly Quality Rollup……..KB4103718”

              “With a name like SMuQeRs  it’s got to be good!”

              Down the memory hole.  😉

              • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by  HiFlyer.
              3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #195913 Reply

              anonymous

              Thank you for the education, and the humor. I updated KB4103718 ok, no problems so far. I have Win 7 Pro SP1 x64, and I guess that I am a “Smucker” – SMQR – Group A – Cumulative updates when Woody gives the Green Light / Defcon 3 or better. My NIC is a Marvell Yukon PCI-E Gigabit Ethernet Controller with a Driver Date of 2009-09-28, just for info. Again, thanks to all the great forum posters on this wonderful AskWoody forum.

              4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195733 Reply

      bassmanzam
      AskWoody Lounger

      Win 7 SP1 x64, Group A, Office 2010

      I’ve attached an image of my network devices.  Will I be bricked because of the Intel Centrino Wireless-N device?

      I also checked my Optional Updates for the first time in a very long time.  I noticed that I have the following update:

      Realtek – Network – Realtek PCIe FE Family Controller – 07/03/2013

      Is it prudent to install this update?

      Thanks to all.

      Attachments:
      You must be logged in to view attached files.
      • #195740 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        Will I be bricked because of the Intel Centrino Wireless-N device?

        Microsoft has not published information on mfg. of NICs experiencing problems. My advice is to make an image backup and create a restore point before you start.

        Realtek – Network – Realtek PCIe FE Family Controller – 07/03/2013 Is it prudent to install this update?

        We recommend getting your drivers from the OEM or the device mfg. instead of Windows Update.

        8 users thanked author for this post.
        • #195747 Reply

          Microfix
          AskWoody MVP

          We recommend getting your drivers from the OEM or the device mfg. instead of Windows Update.

          Could not agree more, MS drivers have been troublesome in the past for lots of systems and OEM drivers usually fix any issues.

          Top-Tip PKCano!

          | 2x Group A W8.1 | Group A+ Linux Hybrid | Group A W7 | Group W XP Pro |
            No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
          2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #195781 Reply

          bassmanzam
          AskWoody Lounger

          Thank you PKCano for your advice! You go above and beyond!

      • #196265 Reply

        jburk07
        AskWoody Lounger

        @bassmanzam,

        Just fyi, I have a system similar to yours, including the Intel Centrino Wireless-N 2230 NIC. I installed the rollup (KB4103718) today and the connection is still working. I have a Realtek card for the Ethernet connection, and it is working as well. I know that everyone’s systems are different, but at least this one was successful using the same card as yours.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #196460 Reply

          bassmanzam
          AskWoody Lounger

          Thanks @jburk07, I took the plunge and installed the monthly rollup (kb4103718) and both the wired and wireless connections are still working. Just need to install .NET and MSRT but that will wait for tomorrow.

          Thanks to all the MVPs for all the advice and guidance to help making Windows updates less stressful.

           

           

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #195738 Reply

      Geo
      AskWoody Lounger

      Group A except never downloaded Previews.   Win 7 X64, home Premium, AMD.   Installed with no problems.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195748 Reply

      anonymous

      Still on 1709, I didn’t do anything but set myself as metered and updates are tagged as “awaiting download”.  Win 8.1 pro is up to date and healthy. Win 7 home #1 is up to date and working. Win 7 home #2 had a broken Windows update that I’ve decided not to fix to see how it fares relative to #1 and is running fine. Two of my laptops are now Ubuntu 18, so we’ll see if I miss having Windows or not. Homeserver 2011 is up to date and healthy.  My biggest risk these days is not malware, but Windows updates.

    • #195751 Reply

      Sue C
      AskWoody Lounger

      Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit (Group B)

      Installation of all updates went well. No NIC problems so far. I did backup my computer’s DW1520 Wireless-N WLAN Half-Mini Card internet drivers just in case thanks to Susan Bradley’s and Bob99’s suggestion. Thank you to everyone who helped to make May’s updates relatively painless.

       

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195753 Reply

      CraigS26
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well… I just did the update on my Win 7 home premium PC (group A). Not network issues but my PC is now INSANELY slow. Takes over 2 minutes to boot to desktop and a minute to shut down. Takes a long time to open chrome and open files in general. I’m gonna roll back, this just isn’t working out for me!

      Can’t repeat enough that several post-WU slow-downs (even Firefox loads) were Corrected by just MULTI-RE-STARTS – then W7 Seemed faster than ever. Even on Re-starts after Updates the “Wait – Win is Processing Updates – Don’t Turn-off computer” — TOOK SOOO LONG I thought W7 was Broken.

      Did my Update on May 15. Try 2-3 Re-Starts and I hope things return to Normal for you.

      No excuse for Everyone not getting an App (ie) Macrium Reflect to make Pre-WU Images. Presume we’re all doing that by now.

      WU Grp A - Win 7-64 Hm Prem / Hm-Stdnt Office '10 - NO Java or Flash

      • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by  CraigS26.
      • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by  CraigS26.
      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #195961 Reply

        anonymous

        I agree with Craig. On occasion I have seen a dismally slow computer right after windows updates, and especially after a .NET update.

        Multiple reboots, maybe even as many as five, and then letting the computer sit for 45 min to an hour, and NOT sleep, it will reorganize itself and run fine.

        As a good measure the last thing you can do is a defrag or optimize (TRIM an SSD) the drive.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195761 Reply

      b
      AskWoody Lounger

      Windows 10 version 1803 still ain’t ready for prime time
      If you’re stuck in Win10 April 2018 Update — the notoriously buggy version 1803 — you need to get the latest cumulative update applied, KB 4100403. But before you do that, think. If you “up”graded to 1803 fewer than 10 days ago, it’s still easy to roll back to your previous version:

      Wasn’t it the notoriously buggy Avast which was preventing updates to 1803?

      What widespread bugs are evident after update to 1803?

      Any real reason to roll back?

      • #195915 Reply

        radosuaf
        AskWoody Lounger

        SSD ones?

        MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti D5 4G * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 1803 64-bit + Windows 10 Mobile 1709 (Lumia 640 LTE)
    • #195763 Reply

      pmcjr6142
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’m not installing KB4103718 given the lack of information coming from MS on this issue.  Talk about a crap shoot.  Maybe it will hurt your PC  or maybe not.  If you don’t connect to a LAN or other network and only go thru a modem to the internet, do you have or need a NIC?  I just have a simple home Dell PC.  Looking at the Device Manager in Control Panel, I can’t tell.  It certainly does not list an Intel product.

      • #195767 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        If you are connecting to the Interned you are using a NIC (Network Interface Card). The Internet is a network. Look under “Network adapters” in the Device Manager to see your NIC’s specs.

        • #195802 Reply

          pmcjr6142
          AskWoody Lounger

          PKCano….I had seen this before in Device Manager, but it didn’t really mean much to me.  It would appear that my NIC card is Realtek PCIeGBE Family Controller.  I know enough to know it’s not Intel which was the suspect NIC.  For now, 4103718 remains hidden unless I get more encouragement to install it.  I really don’t want to get  into a situation needing to restore this Win 7 PC or dealing with the NIC.  I can usually grasp what needs to be done, but this situation breaks new ground.

          • #195804 Reply

            PKCano
            AskWoody MVP

            The reports here are that Realtek doesn’t seem to have a problem – lots of people with them.

            5 users thanked author for this post.
            • #195819 Reply

              KarenS
              AskWoody Lounger

              Any word floating around regarding Atheros wireless adapters? We have two PC’s in our home one has a Realtek and the other an Atheros.   Thanks!

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #195820 Reply

              PKCano
              AskWoody MVP

              I haven’t seen anything on Atheros one way or another.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #195833 Reply

              DrBonzo
              AskWoody Lounger

              @karens
              Last night I did a Security Only and IE 11 update on a Win 7 Starter 32 bit netbook with an Atom processor. It has an Atheros AR5895 Wireless Network adapter. Everything went just fine.

              This particular machine also has listed under ‘Network Adapters’ in Device Manager an Atheros AR8132 PCI-E Fast Ethernet Controller (NDIS 6.2) and Microsoft Virtual WiFi Miniport Adapter. This computer always connects wirelessly, so I don’t know if my success says anything about the Ethernet Adapter, or, for that matter, which of the 2 wireless adapters, but I would take the success as an encouraging sign.

              Good Luck!

              3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #195836 Reply

              KarenS
              AskWoody Lounger

              @drbonzo that is encouraging indeed. Both PC’s have Windows 7 Home x64 and are Group A Both have an Antheros AR8152/8158 PCI-E Fast Ethernet Controller (NDIS 6.20). The PC that has the Antheros adapter has an Antheros AR9285 Wireless Adapter. I am still really scared about this update (which is the only one that is outstanding on both PC’s) because repairing the situation if something goes wrong is way beyond my comprehension even though I have read the instructions that are posted. 🙁

            • #195839 Reply

              Demeter
              AskWoody Lounger

              Ditto, me too. Haven’t done any updates yet. I am stalling as I am definitely in the non-techie catagory & unsure if I can fix if problems arise. Important updates listed in Win Update:KB4099633, KB4103718, KB890830. I hid KB 2952664. Win 7 Pro Grp. A

              • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by  Demeter. Reason: added content
              • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by  Demeter. Reason: edited content
            • #195843 Reply

              KarenS
              AskWoody Lounger

              I tried to edit my post above (#195836) but for some reason I don’t have the ability to edit my own post even though I am logged in, not sure why always had that option before.

              Anyway I wanted to add that the only outstanding update that I mentioned that I have left to do for May is the Security Monthly Quality Rollup one (KB4103718).

              • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by  KarenS.
            • #195966 Reply

              OldBiddy
              AskWoody Lounger

              I also have Atheros and so far no issues with the May update.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #195805 Reply

            DrBonzo
            AskWoody Lounger

            It’s possible you may have more than one NIC. In my Device Manager I’ve got a Realtek, like you do, but when I’m connecting wirelessly, that’s not the one I’m using according to the Network and Sharing center. Wirelessly, I’m using an Intel!

            I’m wondering if the NIC issue is only for wireless or only for Ethernet or for both? Pretty hard to tell.

            Edit: Just after I wrote this I installed the Security Only patch for Win7 x64 SP1 (KB 4103712). Everything seems fine. I’m connecting through an Intel Dual Band Wireless – AC 3160 network adapter (NIC).

            Also installed the IE 11 update without any problems.

            • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by  DrBonzo.
            3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #195896 Reply

              DrBonzo
              AskWoody Lounger

              Just updated another Win 7 SP1 x64 Group B (KB 4103712 Security Only and KB 4103768 IE 11) with an Ethernet connection via an Intel 82579LM Gigabit Network Connection network adapter (NIC).

              Absolutely no problems.

              So that’s 2 Win 7 SP1 x64 Group B machines with no issues. Both have Intel NICs, one wireless (see my post immediately above) and the other wired.

              2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #195785 Reply

        DrBonzo
        AskWoody Lounger

        pmcjr6142 – See this post from Bob99; I found it very helpful.

        https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/patch-lady-so-what-about-the-b-patchers/#post-194688

        3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195764 Reply

      Charlie
      AskWoody Lounger

      I asked this question a while ago and got no reply.  So I’ll try again.  Are we supposed to install the Microsoft HID Class, 5-14-2018, 3.3.207.0, 441 KB update, driver, or whatever it is?  My first inclination is to not install it, but want to be sure.  Thanks.   🙂

      Capture2

      Win 7 Home Premium, x64, Intel i3-2120 3.3GHz, Group B

      Attachments:
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      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #195768 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        We don’t recommend installing hardware drivers from Windows Update. If you need a driver, you should download it from the OEM or device mfg.’s website.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #195773 Reply

          Charlie
          AskWoody Lounger

          Thanks, that’s what I’ve always practiced.  But when one comes through as “Important” and is checked, plus never having got one like this before, it throws me off and makes me wonder. Thanks very much for clarifying that PK.

          Win 7 Home Premium, x64, Intel i3-2120 3.3GHz, Group B

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #195799 Reply

        Bob99
        AskWoody Lounger

        …And while you’re at it, uncheck and hide KB2952664. KB2952664 is nothing more than telemetry sent back to Microsoft for some not so clear purposes, which some consider very invasive. Lots of info here on AskWoody about it. Perhaps @pkcano or @kirsty can dig up a few links to prior discussions about it.

        • #195825 Reply

          anonymous

          Bob99 wrote:

          Perhaps @pkcano or @kirsty can dig up a few links to prior discussions about it.

          I dunno, Bob, I think maybe they’re both kinda busy, but fortunately it’s pretty easy for anyone to look up information on this site.

          First, find the search box (located on the right side of the AskWoody homepage, and also at https://www.askwoody.com/forums/search/ ). Then just enter a keyword or two for whatever topic interests you (e.g., 2952664) and hit the search button, and… Voila! Links aplenty!

          Hope this helps.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #196038 Reply

          Charlie
          AskWoody Lounger

          Thanks but there’s no need, I already know about that one.  It came out years ago and is back again.  Now the reason why it’s back is a good question.

          Win 7 Home Premium, x64, Intel i3-2120 3.3GHz, Group B

      • #195810 Reply

        anonymous

        I installed this some while back without any issues. Under “Package Details” on the update catalog entry, it refers to hardware IDs which match the Vendor/Product code for my Microsoft keyboard which is probably why it was offered to me (and others). Since I purchased the keyboard directly from Microsoft, technically they are the OEM/device mfr, so I’m guessing this would be an exception to the rule of avoiding MS hardware updates.

    • #195782 Reply

      Purg2
      AskWoody Lounger

      /snip – wouldn’t you be unable to Scan for Hardware Changes because your NIC is now a BRICK? Or doesn’t the scan need the NIC?

      /snip – Loosing the device driver and it loss of use can easily be regained by reinstalling the driver.

      Am I correct interpreting this to mean that the device manager will see the NIC to “scan for changes” despite the update causing a possible loss of internet capability?  Having never had to do this I don’t want my Win7 buddy to be left w/o internet.

      Win 8.1 Group B, Linux Dabbler

      • #195784 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        The scan for hardware changes is changes on your PC, not on the Internet.

        If you scan for DRIVERS, you can scan on your PC or you may include the Internet.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #195788 Reply

          Purg2
          AskWoody Lounger

          Sounds like I’ll still be able to see it if things go sideways.  Thanks PK.

          Win 8.1 Group B, Linux Dabbler

    • #195786 Reply

      JohnW
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well… I just did the update on my Win 7 home premium PC (group A). Not network issues but my PC is now INSANELY slow. Takes over 2 minutes to boot to desktop and a minute to shut down. Takes a long time to open chrome and open files in general. I’m gonna roll back, this just isn’t working out for me!

      Can’t repeat enough that several post-WU slow-downs (even Firefox loads) were Corrected by just MULTI-RE-STARTS – then W7 Seemed faster than ever. Even on Re-starts after Updates the “Wait – Win is Processing Updates – Don’t Turn-off computer” — TOOK SOOO LONG I thought W7 was Broken. Did my Update on May 15. Try 2-3 Re-Starts and I hope things return to Normal for you. No excuse for Everyone not getting an App (ie) Macrium Reflect to make Pre-WU Images. Presume we’re all doing that by now.

      Good suggestion!  I have made it a habit to always do restarts after updates, and that has cleared out some buggy stuff a few times.  I have a feeling that the WU sometimes leaves things hanging in an unstable state at times when it has finished, for whatever unknown reason.

      And double +1 for taking pre-WU images.  I wouldn’t consider going without, ever!

      • #195818 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Lounger

        While that has not happened to me before, something similar has:

        Occasionally, once the installation of the patches, supposedly, has been completed so I start a new session right after that and, once finished, logoff again, the message that “Windows is being updated, do not shut down your computer” comes up once more and there is some more installing going on without my having told the PC to install anything else. After that extra install (or whatever this might be) is done, nothing remarkable happens the next time I login, do some work and, once finished, log off again.

        So all ends well, in spite of this strange interlude.

        Group B, Windows 7 Pro, Sp1, x64, Intel I-7 “sandy bridge.”

         

    • #195806 Reply

      Bob99
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well, I just successfully updated two computers, both Win7 x64 SP1 with Intel NIC’s using group A KB4103718 with NO problems.

      Only “issue”, if you want to call it that, was a slower-than-usual reboot immediately after installing the update and during the next reboot as well.

      Been smooth sailing since then, no speed impact on either computer! One computer has an Intel i5-750 first generation core processor, the other one has a second generation Intel core processor, the i3-2120. Both are on Intel motherboards with the H55 and H67 chipsets, which incorporate the NIC chip on the motherboard.

      However, before starting, I performed a little “backup” of the NIC drivers in use as I describe in the post @drbonzo refers to above, specifically the next to last paragraph.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #195807 Reply

      Demeter
      AskWoody Lounger

      I am insanely confused. Went back and followed Bob99 instructions to DrBonzo for viewing Network Adapters. Finally figured out how to view and record the driver locations for the NIC. Here is the info from the window that opened:

      Driver File Details

      Intel(R) Centrino(R) Advanced -N6235

      C:\Windows\system32\DRIVERS\NETwsw100.sys

      C\Windows\system32\drivers\vwifibus.sys

      File version 15.9.12

      Can someone enlighten me as to what all of that means if I lose NIC after updating? Win7 Pro i7 Haswell Grp. A Am I looking at the correct information in Network Adaptors? There are about 6 entries under Network Adaptors and I do have “Show hidden devices” unchecked.

       

      • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by  Demeter. Reason: Added content
      • #195813 Reply

        Bob99
        AskWoody Lounger

        The files listed are the drivers for your network card. You need to write the locations down, or copy the files to a location on a hard drive installed within the computer itself and not to a network drive. By this I mean to the C: drive (or D: drive if you have C: for your operating system and D: for your data).

        That way, you can point Windows to the proper, currently-working drivers in the event it “forgets” what you have for a networking card.

        I simply made a new folder on my C: drive labeled “NIC drivers” and copied the files to that folder. In that folder, I also made a text file with the proper locations of all the driver files needed for the card on each computer, as I have two computers. That way, I would have been able to copy the files back to their proper locations if I had needed to. Or, I could have followed the directions in KB4103718 to let Windows “discover” the drivers all over again and install them itself.

        With multiple entries under “Network adapters” in Device manager, you really need to find out which one is currently being used. That’s why I stated in the post you’re referring to that you need to go into the Network and Sharing Center to see the name of the card that’s currently being used. That way you know which entry to focus on in Device Manager.

        I hope this helps clarify things a bit.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #195815 Reply

          Demeter
          AskWoody Lounger

          Clarified a tiny bit but I still feel hopelessly confused. Did I correctly identify the card that’s being used? As for making  new folder on Drive C and copying files to that folder and also making a text file with proper location of driver files needed for card, way above my pay grade. If I do lose NIC after installing KB4103718 would letting Windows “discover” the drivers fix it? I don’t want to be w/o internet connection. Thanks Bob99.

          • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by  Demeter. Reason: eliminated a redundant question
          • #195852 Reply

            Bob99
            AskWoody Lounger

            …If I do lose NIC after installing KB4103718 would letting Windows “discover” the drivers fix it?…

            To answer your question, yes, it should from what I’ve read in the bulletin for KB4103718. The link to the bulletin is here. One you’re reading it, scroll down to the grey and white box under the heading of “Known issues in this update”. The second problem listed is the networking card issue. If you read paragraph 2a, which begins “Alternatively, install the drivers…”, it will also answer your question.

            To make sure you’re looking at the right networking card listing in Device Manager (since you say you have 6 entries under “Network adapters” there), please read the third and fourth paragraphs of my post here. That will tell you how to make sure you’re looking at the right one.

            If you DO have networking issues, point Windows to the locations you’ve written down for the two drivers you mentioned in your earlier post, and it should be able to do the rest.

            Might also be a good idea to get the latest driver(s) for your NIC from your computer manufacturer’s website or from Intel themselves. Start with your manufacturer’s website and if that doesn’t work out then go to Intel’s site. Whatever you do, please do not download and install drivers for your NIC from Windows Update or Microsoft.

            One final note, though: Most folks with Win7 who’ve posted here in this thread have had no networking issues at all after installing this month’s update, so you may very well wind up in that group with the rest of us. 🙂

            4 users thanked author for this post.
            • #195877 Reply

              Demeter
              AskWoody Lounger

              OK. Have read the bulletin for KB4103718, I’ve gone back and re-read your earlier post on finding the networking card in Device Manager & I’m 99% sure I did the steps correctly and came up with  Intel(R) Centrino(R) Advanced- N6235. Now to getting the latest driver(s) from manufacturer, (HP) or Intel, is it driver updates related to wireless connection I’m looking for? Apologies for the tiresome questions, but I reiterate: I’m a non-techie who just wants my computer to work.Holy Cow Batman! I just got into HP’s driver updates and there are so many different updates for my laptop, HP ZBook 17, I don’t know where to begin.

              • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by  Demeter. Reason: added content
            • #196458 Reply

              Bob99
              AskWoody Lounger

              Sorry for the slow reply. As you have seen, there are a LOT of updates available from HP for your laptop. You want to focus on just the latest driver for your Intel Centrino -N6235 networking “card” or “chip”. Go ahead and download it but don’t install it. You just want it on hand in case it’s needed in the future.

              Once you’ve found the latest driver for your laptop from HP, go ahead and take the plunge by following the previously-given advice (and the copying the instructions from KB4103718 for loss of networking card to a safe place in case you need them), and installing KB4103718. Just make sure that it’s the ONLY item being installed by Windows Update. While you’re at it, do a manual signature update check for your anti-malware/anti-virus program. That way, even IT shouldn’t interrupt the update’s installation.

              Once Windows Update changes its window to tell you the update has been successfully installed and that it’s time to reboot, give it ANOTHER 10 minutes or so just to make sure that it has finished all the behind-the-scenes work it does to get updates ready to reboot. If that amount of time has passed and the hard drive is still churning away, wait until the hard drive light stays out fairly consistently before rebooting.

              If you haven’t taken the plunge yet, I hope this helps you further. Again, sorry for the long time between replies.

    • #195814 Reply

      JohnW
      AskWoody Lounger

      Strictly speaking “bricked” also ONLY refers to mobile devices – they have similar size to a brick and when they are unrepairably broken, similar functionality. Using the term for either repairable devices or larger devices (eg a pc) or even parts of a device, like you say is misusing the term 😛

      That may be the most common use of the term today, but it originated long before many of the common portable consumer devices existed.

      I recall it being used 20 years ago in regards to updating the BIOS in a PC.  For example, if you lost power during a BIOS flash update, you would brick your motherboard BIOS chip.

      The real misuse of the term is when an item is actually repairable, then it is not really bricked, as in broken.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #195936 Reply

        Elly
        AskWoody MVP

        The term was in use long before mobile devices were available, or the people I knew were simply early adapters of it… Even this non-techy was well aware of the dangers of inadvertent ‘bricking’. I don’t see that in the internet references (wikipedia)… but computers could ‘brick’ before the internet was a thing… I know that people went out of their way to use a power supply to do certain things on their computer, in order to avoid ‘bricking’ it by risking a  disruption in the electrical power… a well-known problem to be avoided. Floppy disk days… imagine those youngsters thinking that this was invented for a mobile or tablet problem!

        Win 7 Home, 64 bit, Group B

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #195947 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Lounger

          “To brick”, “bricking” and “bricked” are used in place of the verbal constructs “to turn into a doorstop”, “turning into… “, “turned into…” They mean the same: making a useful object into something useless for its intended purpose.
          I like “bricking”, because it makes the noun “brick” into a convenient one-word verb, as it is common in English.

           

          • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by  OscarCP.
          2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195817 Reply

      JohnW
      AskWoody Lounger

      I am attempting the update on my Win10 Home x64 laptop from 1607 to 1709 today, for the second time. It failed for some reason at 75%, and reverted to the old version. I uninstalled Bitdefender, and activated and updated Windows Defender instead, before attempting again. Also ensured that all other Win 1607 updates are current.

      That did the trick!  Removing the 3rd party AV, and switching on Defender, plus making sure that all 1607 updates were current.  Running Win10 1709 Home on the laptop now!  It tried to slip in the 1803 afterwards, which I had to nip with wushowhide.  Got it in time. LOL!

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #195822 Reply

      anonymous

      I haven’t done the update yet and I am Windows 7 64 bit Group B but I have saved my NIC drivers as has been suggested as I use an Intel card.

      Interesting read and great input from all involved.

    • #195834 Reply

      planet
      AskWoody Lounger

      Thanks to all for continuing to guide us. I’ve installed the security only (catalog), IE 11 cumulative (catalog) and the Net cumlative (from WU) for May. Have an Atheros LAN and wireless NIC. No problems to report thus far. All’s well. Peace for about a month.

      Group B Win 7 64 bit

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195858 Reply

      bjm
      AskWoody Lounger

      1709 (16299.461) with Hidden
      Thanks

      Attachments:
      You must be logged in to view attached files.
    • #195845 Reply

      anonymous

      Win 7 updated fine for me. My Network card is a Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller, according to Device Manager.

      I meant to hold off, but my dad saw it say it needed to update after a power outage, and assumed he needed to do it. I thought I’d already told him that we tend to wait until “that guy on the Internet” says it’s okay.

    • #195881 Reply

      Nibbled To Death By Ducks
      AskWoody Lounger

      Reporting in: KB 103718 installed and no NIC issues so far. PC stats below, device and drivers by Broadcomm, apparently.

      It was a very long 17 minutes. (The Install/Reboot)

      Thank you, Great Maker. Thank you, Woody.  Thank you, Patch Lady. Thanks to all the crew here for services above and beyond!

      Now, I’m not a drinking man, but tonight…. 🙂 I really am getting too old for this…

      I swear…the quarter before WIN 7 gets it’s plug pulled, I am for a XP-style revolt against it’s end-of-life, and being forced into Windows 10, as I have seen so much grief THOSE people have had to go thru.

      Again, thanks to all!  We got through the reef once again without “staving ‘er ribs in”!

      Win7 Pro SP1 64-bit, Dell Latitude E6330, Intel CORE i5 "Ivy Bridge", Group "A/B [negative] :)", Air-Gapped backups, "Notify but do not download or install without asking."

      --

      "The more kinks you put in the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the pipes!" -Scotty

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #195884 Reply

      cesmart4125
      AskWoody Lounger

      I made an image of my Kingston SSD using Macrium Reflect.  In the event I have problems after downloading and installing kb 4103718 for 32-bit Win 7, how would I use this image?

      Should I make a point of creating a restore point before downloading and installing this update.  Thanks for answering my questions.

      Charles

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by  cesmart4125. Reason: wanted to be notified of follow-up replies
      • #195885 Reply

        Kirsty
        AskWoody MVP

        A restore point is associated with a system image backup, but it won’t hurt to create another separately as well.

        For information on restoring system image backups, see these:
        http://www.dummies.com/computers/operating-systems/windows-7/how-to-restore-an-image-backup-in-windows-7/
        https://www.howtogeek.com/239312/how-to-restore-system-image-backups-on-windows-7-8-and-10/

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #195892 Reply

          cesmart4125
          AskWoody Lounger

          Kirsty, many thanks!!

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #195908 Reply

          JohnW
          AskWoody Lounger

          That link describes restoring an image made with the Windows image utility, and will only locate an image file made by Windows.  I use both methods, so I wanted to add this for clarification.

          The poster inquired about restoring an image file made with Macrium Reflect, which will require Macrium Rescue Media to restore.  I included basic instructions for this task in another post in this thread.

          4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #195907 Reply

        JohnW
        AskWoody Lounger

        I use Macrium Reflect, so I can try to give a simple answer here, but the user guide is well written, and highly recommended reading!  https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW7/Macrium+Reflect+User+Guide

        You have taken the first big step by installing Macrium and taking an image.  You are almost ready.

        The next thing you should do is open the “Other Tasks” menu in Macrium and click on “Create Rescue Media”.  That will launch the Rescue media Wizard, which will build a bootable rescue media for you, in case you need to restore your system drive.  You can choose to build this on your DVD drive, or a USB thumb drive.

        The wizard will build a Windows PE recovery environment with the Macrium GUI, and any drivers needed will be automatically downloaded for you during the build.  This is the easiest tool I have ever used!

        The rescue media can boot your system even if you cannot boot Windows, or if you want to restore an earlier image to your system drive.  You cannot restore your system drive while Windows is booted, so that is why you need a bootable recovery drive.  Just connect your backup image drive so you can locate the image you want to restore from, and then boot from the recovery drive into Windows PE.

        The Macrium restore GUI is pretty much self explanatory, you browse and select your image file to restore, select the target drive, and go!

         

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #196001 Reply

          Jan K.
          AskWoody Lounger

          It is recommended to have a test disc for… well, testing.

          After a system backup has been created, do a restore to test disc. Close down, insert as boot disc and restart to verify everything’s working properly.

          You do not want to try this in a “real world situation”… plus it will familiarize you with the procedures.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #196047 Reply

            JohnW
            AskWoody Lounger

            Absolutely!  It is not actually a full disaster recovery process until it has been fully tested, including a test restore.   Having a spare drive available can make that a painless process.  Much easier done on a desktop than a laptop though.  Make sure you disconnect your main drive before you attempt this, so that you do not inadvertently select the wrong drive!

            One thing you could do if that is a technical hurdle too high, is boot into recovery and make sure you can browse to your latest image, and can select the correct target drive to restore to.  Then you can power off, before hitting the “Next” button, knowing that much of the process works.

            But there is absolutely nothing like the feeling you get when you successfully complete a full restore!  You feel like you are in full control of your computer destiny, and a master of the universe, LOL!!!  Instant promotion to geek, level II.  🙂

            3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195898 Reply

      TonyS
      AskWoody Lounger

      Thanks Woody et al 🙂

      Successfully updated two Lenovo laptops (W7 x64, Group A, atheros athrx.sys driver) and one HP (W7 x64, Group A, broadcom bcmwl664.sys driver). No issues spotted so far.

      Initial restore point set and Bob99 advice followed to make note of the drivers.

      Now only an old desktop beast remaining (W7 x86) but the hard drive is cloned on a regular basis anyway.

      Win7 (both x86 & x64) Home Premium, Avast Free plus MBAM 3 Premium, PaleMoon not IE, OpenOffice not Office, Sumatra PDF not Adobe.
      • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by  TonyS.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #195900 Reply

      Pepsiboy
      AskWoody Lounger

      Last night I updated my HP laptop and HP desktop with KB4103712, KB4103768, .NET Framework update, and MSRT. So far no problems, except that the HP Wireless Assistant on the laptop was disabled. Took me a while to figure out where to go to get it enabled again, but now all seems to be OK.

      Both systems running Win7 Sp1 x64 Group B.

      Many thanks to Woody and the crew for all the help and great advice.

      Dave

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #195909 Reply

        HiFlyer
        AskWoody Lounger

        @ Pepsiboy #195900 “…the HP Wireless Assistant on the laptop was disabled.”

        Was the problem related to the SOQU (security only) KB4103712?

        What was the fix?

        Thanks  HF

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #195901 Reply

      alpha128
      AskWoody Lounger

      I installed the Windows 7 x64 patches for 2018-05, specifically KB4099633 (.NET rollup) and KB4103718 (Windows rollup).  So far I have not experienced any problems.

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by  alpha128.
      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195906 Reply

      Microfix
      AskWoody MVP

      Brought our Group A W7 Pro x64 back online today and patched from Dec 2017 straight thru to May 2018. No problems encountered whatsoever. The reported NIC issue hasn’t affected the PC phew..

      I did notice the system seemed sluggish to start with but, once cleaned up using disk cleaner and a couple of reboots to remove remnants of installed patches together with disabling meltdown via Steve Gibsons Inspectre utility, all is well 🙂

      Decided on taking the performance hit on the Haswell PC which is annoying but, security comes first. sigh..

      Addition: sfc/ verifyonly found nothing!

      | 2x Group A W8.1 | Group A+ Linux Hybrid | Group A W7 | Group W XP Pro |
        No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195924 Reply

      dgreen
      AskWoody Lounger

      Reporting in on Installing May Updates this morning:

      Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit SP 1 GROUP A
      Processor:  Intel i3-3240 (ivy bridge 3rd generation)
      chipset Intel (R) 7 series/C216
      chipset family SATA AHCI Controller -1 E02
      NIC Realtek PCLE GBE Family Controller

      Windows Update Scanned
      Kb4103718 (rollup)  checked and installed.  No issues, rebooted.
      Did a Windows update scan again
      KB4099633 (.net rollup) checked and installed.  No issues, rebooted.

      This is were the problem started.

      When I did a windows update scan again to get to the MSRT
      I got that red alert with an error code that windows could not update and to try again.
      I did.  Got the error code again.
      Sorry did not write down the code.
      Deceided to shut down my computer and give it a rest for about 1/2 hr.
      Restarted my computer.  Went to Windows update and scanned for updates.
      No problems.  Windows Update scanned.
      MSRT for May (KB890830) checked and appeared to be installing fine.

      However, that was not the case.
      Windows History said the update (KB890830)  failed.
      Windows Update page said update not needed.
      HUH?????

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by  dgreen.
      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #195981 Reply

        Bill C.
        AskWoody Lounger

        I used to get a similar reaction at times to MSE or MSRT updates.  It would say it was a successful install, then if you checked WU for the next batch of updates, it would give the red error warning.

        A reboot would “fix” the problem.  You could again check WU. but the former successful install now said it had failed for an unknown reason.  Trying to do an update via WU or MSE would work and say success, but the definitions number would not have advanced.  Manually downloading the definitions or MSRT would say up to date.

        I believe what was actually happening was the server connection was broken early triggering the failure notice, but after the actual install routine had successfully finished.  Rebooting made you start fresh and was successful.  I deduced this when one time it actually threw an error code that indicated a server disconnect.

        Not a scientific fact, but an observation that was repeated a few times.  Of course, YMMV.

        4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195926 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      For what it’s worth, I’ve done less tweaking on my v1709 VM than in past history, but I don’t think I caused it.

      Do your systems successfully navigate the following command?

      SFC /VERIFYONLY

      Yep, this runs fine on mine.

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    • #195937 Reply

      dgreen
      AskWoody Lounger

      Reporting in on Installing May Updates this morning: Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit SP 1 GROUP A Processor: Intel i3-3240 (ivy bridge 3rd generation) chipset Intel (R) 7 series/C216 chipset family SATA AHCI Controller -1 E02 NIC Realtek PCLE GBE Family Controller Windows Update Scanned Kb4103718 (rollup) checked and installed. No issues, rebooted. Did a Windows update scan again KB4099633 (.net rollup) checked and installed. No issues, rebooted. This is were the problem started. When I did a windows update scan again to get to the MSRT I got that red alert with an error code that windows could not update and to try again. I did. Got the error code again. Sorry did not write down the code. Deceided to shut down my computer and give it a rest for about 1/2 hr. Restarted my computer. Went to Windows update and scanned for updates. No problems. Windows Update scanned. MSRT for May (KB890830) checked and appeared to be installing fine. However, that was not the case. Windows History said the update (KB890830) failed. Windows Update page said update not needed. HUH?????

      Just to give a heads up….
      Rebooted my computer and Scanned Windows Update.
      MSRT May was being offered again.
      Clicked on the update and…….
      Installation was successful this time.
      Must have been some sort of glich.
      Computer is running fine.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195940 Reply

      Pepsiboy
      AskWoody Lounger

      @ Pepsiboy #195900 “…the HP Wireless Assistant on the laptop was disabled.” Was the problem related to the SOQU (security only) KB4103712? What was the fix? Thanks HF

      I’m not sure if it was related or not. The fix was to go to the HP folder, find the Wireless Assistant, open as Administrator, and manually turn it on. So far, everything seems to be OK.

      Dave

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195941 Reply

      Seff
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’ve installed the monthly rollup KB4103718 and the .net framework KB4099633 updates together with the MSRT on my gaming desktop Windows 7 x64 Home machine today, seemingly with no problems.

      Assuming no issues arise then in a day or two I shall install the same updates on my admin desktop Windows 7 x64 Home machine, along with 7 updates for Office 2010.

      Thanks as always to Woody and the Team for their advice.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #196442 Reply

        Seff
        AskWoody Lounger

        Update: Second machine now duly patched, no apparent issues.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195944 Reply

      SueW
      AskWoody Lounger

      Must have been some sort of glich.

      @dgreen, you might not have waited (5-10 minutes) before checking ‘Windows Update’ after you rebooted your system.  I encountered this same issue once, and then realized that I should wait so that Windows could do its “thing” after booting up.

      I’m glad everything turned out well for you!

      Win 7 SP1 Home Premium 64-bit; Office 2010; Group B; Former 'Tech Weenie'

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195942 Reply

      anonymous

      I am not techie, I am only following the guide, but I am curios to know why KB4099637, https://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=kb4099637%20windows%207%20, is not included as a security only update for group B for May 2018. Thanks. CH

      • #195953 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        The guidelines for Group B are in AKB2000003. The security-only updates for Group B refer to security-only updates for Windows, in the attempt to avoid the telemetry included in the Monthly Rollups.

        KB4099637 is a .NET update. Group guidelines recommend installing the .NET Rollups through Windows Update as it was felt that they were not a source of the telemetry being avoided. .NET updates are not included in Group B.

        • #195959 Reply

          anonymous

          Thanks for the answer, CH

        • #195968 Reply

          anonymous

          PKCano, thank you for all you do. But with Group B on occasion there is a .NET security only update.
          While I do agree the original idea was to avoid telemetry, there are “security only” patches concerning .NET and it would be nice if you. MrBrian, or Woody would advise on us Group B people installing these Security Only .Nets.

          Thank you Woody and your MVPs.

          • #195973 Reply

            PKCano
            AskWoody MVP

            While there are often security-only patches for .NET – they ARE NOT part of Group B, never have been. If you choose to do the security-only patches for .NET, you deviate from Group B guidelines.

            • #195977 Reply

              anonymous

              Be aware that a short while back a .Net rollup messed up graphics rendering in programs which use DirectX. The Security Only update did not. Most pro photo-editing software utilizes DirectX. Not worth the risk doing rollups IMO after that last fiasco. YMMV…

            • #196083 Reply

              anonymous

              Thank you Anonymous, I can not let this go. I ask that GonetoPlaid and others investigate this .NET Group B installation procedure.

              Windows Vista came with .NET version 2. Windows 7 came with .NET version 3.5.1. Windows 8.1 comes with .Net 4.5.1. It is part of the OS. You can “disable” it in Windows Components, but it is not uninstalled, just turned off.

              If MS is going to make a .NET Security Only patch, and you are a Group B person, it makes sense to install the .NET Security Only patch.

              Months ago GoneToPlaid said, “I deliberately have not installed any versions of .NET Framework higher than the 4.5 branch on my Windows 7 computers since .NET Framework 4.6 and higher include telemetry and are only needed if you want to run Windows 10 applications on Windows 7 and Windows 8x computers. Just a “heads up” for everyone on Group B.”

              I agree with him and have not installed any .NETs above 3.5.1 on my Windows 7.

              If everyone allows the “.NET rollup” to install, what is to prevent telemetry from being added if not now but maybe in the future? When Woody said he did not think any telemetry was in the .NET rollups this was at the beginning of the new Windows 7 patching method last year.

              I feel people are avoiding this issue because it is “too hard” to try and decide what to do, the rollup is way simpler.

              It seems logical that: If you are Group B and do not want telemetry and do Security Only patches, and since .NET comes in Windows, and MS offers a .NET Security Only patch, that is what should be installed to maintain your OS.

            • #196090 Reply

              DrBonzo

              It seems to me that much of your issue is one of semantics. Group A is group A by definition and Group B is Group B by definition; they are what they are because they are defined to be that way.

              Any individual, no matter to which group they belong, is free to install either the .NET Rollup, .NET Security Only, or, for that matter, none of the .NET patches/updates. To each as they see fit.

              The Security Only patches are easily obtainable from a source such as this, the .NET Blog for May:
              https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/dotnet/2018/05/08/net-framework-may-2018-security-and-quality-rollup/

              Scroll about half way down the page and you’ll see the .Net patches for May listed by type – Rollup or Security Only. Simple.

              3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #196091 Reply

              DrBonzo
              AskWoody Lounger

              Forgot I wasn’t logged in; the above post #196090 is from DrBonzo

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #196164 Reply

              anonymous

              I feel the people of Group B need to do the .NET patches specifically the Security Only ones. Since we are Group B, we tend to focus on the Security Only rather than the rollups. The rollups are easy when you let windows update do it, but if one only wants security updates, those are the ones to get.

              The .NET updates also DO affect windows OS. See the links below.

              https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4099637/security-only-update-for-net-framework-3-5-1-4-5-2-4-6-4-6-1-4-6-2-4-7
              and
              https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4095514/description-of-the-security-only-update-for-net-framework-3-5-1-for-wi

              They say: “Additionally, this update resolves a security feature bypass vulnerability in Windows that could allow an attacker to bypass Device Guard. An attacker who successfully exploits this vulnerability could circumvent a User Mode Code Integrity (UMCI) policy on the computer. ”

              So if you get the .NET updates through WU or better still the Security Only -for each of your installed versions- you are more secure.

              I suggest people research if the .NETs they have over 3.5.1 for Windows 7, are actually needed. Like some programs on your computer, you may not even need them if you do not have a program that requires it. If not, then uninstall them. You will close a point of entry to your computer.

              For those interested in .NETs, Arron Stebner has a verification or cleanup tool. You can use it to see which version you have.

              Arron does keep it updated. The cleanup tool is a last ditch uninstall if all else fails.

              https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/astebner/2013/11/06/net-framework-setup-verification-tool-and-cleanup-tool-now-support-net-framework-4-5-1/

            • #196186 Reply

              PKCano
              AskWoody MVP

              The .NET updates ARE NOT a part of Group B.

            • #195990 Reply

              The Surfing Pensioner
              AskWoody Lounger

              I didn’t know “Group B” had guidelines; I thought we were renegades! Nevertheless, I was happy to install kb 4099633. It seems like ages since WU offered me a .Net update and I had the feeling my PC was due one. No issues as yet.

              4 users thanked author for this post.
            • #196146 Reply

              OscarCP
              AskWoody Lounger

              The Surfing Pensioner wrote: “I didn’t know “Group B” had guidelines; I thought we were renegades!

              And with a beer or six / we get together and sing / the Ballad of Group B!

              Sorry, just couldn’t resist…

              And a week after updating the Group B way, fully and through May, still no problems.

              Group B, Win 7 Pro, Sp1 x64 Intel I-7 “sandy bridge.”

          • #196015 Reply

            SueW
            AskWoody Lounger

            anon, I also employ the Group B approach.  And though “rollup” is a dirty word for us, it has an entirely different meaning in .Net Framework, as explained here:

            https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/dotnet/2016/10/11/net-framework-monthly-rollups-explained/

            Security and Quality Rollup
            The Security and Quality Rollup is recommended for consumer and developer machines. It includes both security and quality improvements and is cumulative, meaning that it contains all of the updates from previous rollups. This makes it easy to catch up if you have missed any of the previous updates. The Security and Quality Rollup update will be made available on Windows Update and Windows Update Catalog.

            Security Only Update
            The Security Only Update is recommended for production machines. It contains only the security updates that are new for that month. This enables you to fine-tune the security updates that are applied. If you have installed the Security and Quality Rollup for the month, then you are up to date and do not need to install the Security Only Update. The Security Only Update will be made available on Windows Server Update Services and Microsoft Update Catalog.

            So although I wasn’t initially sure which mode of .Net Framework to install, I’ve been installing the cumulative ‘Security and Quality Rollup’ whenever WU says it’s “Important” and checked.  So far, so good . . .

            Win 7 SP1 Home Premium 64-bit; Office 2010; Group B; Former 'Tech Weenie'

            2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #195952 Reply

      anonymous

      FWIW, Zbook 17 workstation with Haswell chip and Intel NIC running Win7 Pro x64.

      Group B, installed IE 11 update followed by Win Security Only followed by .Net Security Only for 4.6.1, etc. Hard reboots after each. Slow and a lot of fan activity after the .Net, but who knows with MS. 🙁

      Boot and shut down times have increased 50% to 100% but no pattern in the last 24 hours. Have noted no other impacts so far…, but with MS, who knows… 🙁 This whole backup and update process is a royal pain. Office 2010 updates and MSRT with no hitches so far noted afterwards.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #195978 Reply

      Charlie
      AskWoody Lounger

      …And while you’re at it, uncheck and hide KB2952664. KB2952664 is nothing more than telemetry sent back to Microsoft for some not so clear purposes, which some consider very invasive. Lots of info here on AskWoody about it.

      Oh yeah, this is one I’ve known about for years it seems.  Woody warned us about this when the infamous MS GWX fiasco started.

      Win 7 Home Premium, x64, Intel i3-2120 3.3GHz, Group B

    • #195982 Reply

      anonymous

      after installing May .NET Framework security & quality update via WU update , old .NET Framework security update appeared in WU update list KB2604115 2012-05-08 anyone notice the same ?

    • #195988 Reply

      Mr. Natural
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’m going to start pushing  KB4103712 and KB 4103718 to our Windows 7 systems in the test environment. These are the only 2 updates for Windows 7 that have not been approved in WSUS. There are around 60 computers needing these updates so if I run into any issues I will report back. I should have a good idea if there are issues within the next 2 days. 2 have already been updated with no issues. Most of these are 3 – 4 year old Dell Optiplex (390, 3010, among others) small form factor with onboard nic.

      One of the systems I updated myself was running slow as mentioned by some. A reboot fixed the issue so confirming that.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #196689 Reply

        Mr. Natural
        AskWoody Lounger

        I haven’t run into any issues with these updates in the test environment so they are being approved into production today.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #196027 Reply

      SueW
      AskWoody Lounger

      I updated my system this afternoon as follows:

      1 – imaged my disk with Macrium Reflect

      2 – downloaded KB4103712 (May SO) & KB4103768 (IE11) Updates

      3 – installed each Update and then rebooted

      4 – checked “Windows Update”

      5 – unchecked and hid “Important” update KB4103718 (Rollup)

      6 – hid the 2 unchecked “Optional” updates (KB4103713 and KB4103472)

      7 – checked for updates again

      8 – unhid any hidden updates to install today (none)

      9 – installed 7 Office 2010 updates; KB890830 (MSRT); and KB4099633 (2018-05 Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework …, 4.6.1, … on Windows 7 for x64 ) — all originally found after #4 above

      10 – rebooted

      Note: NIC = Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller

      Once again, Many Thanks to Woody and everyone else here who continue to contribute to AskWoody!

      Win 7 SP1 Home Premium 64-bit; Office 2010; Group B; Former 'Tech Weenie'

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #196033 Reply

      fernlady
      AskWoody Lounger

      I updated this afternoon KB4099633, KB4103718, KB890830 and all went smoothly. Computer has Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller. Thank you Woody and crew for being so patient with this non techie person.

      Windows 7 Home x64 AMD Group A

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #196063 Reply

      Demeter
      AskWoody Lounger

      Geronimo! Took the leap and installed KB4103718, reboot, (5 mins to reboot), KB4099633, reboot, (again, only a couple of mins.) and MSRT. No problems, no slow bootup or webpage loading. Thanks Bob99 and all the other techies who answer queries from those of us in the non-techie group. As always “Thanks” to “Da Boss”. Win 7 x64 Pro, i7 Haswell, Grp. A,  Intel(R) Centrino(R) Advanced-N6235 Now I know what a Network Adapter is!

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #196065 Reply

      Mr. Natural
      AskWoody Lounger

      Many Thanks to Woody and everyone else here who continue to contribute to AskWoody!

      Hear! Here!

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #196068 Reply

      CADesertRat
      AskWoody Lounger

      Just finished updating my W7 Pro x64 with Intel 82579V NIC and Atheros AR9485 wireless network.

      Both seem to be working “So far”.

      I did the “Rollup” KB 4103718, .NET KB 4099633, and MSRT.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #196078 Reply

        CADesertRat
        AskWoody Lounger

        BTW, thanks to all for info on what to watch out for, although so far everything went smooth. I made a clone first and then made a Restore Point before even attempting the updates, I only have 2 more computers to go. Hopefully they will go smoothly also.

    • #196073 Reply

      cesmart4125
      AskWoody Lounger

      Just finished installing May’s updates including KB4103718.  So far , everything seems to be working.  Thanks to Woody, Ms. Susan, PKCano, Kirsty, and my fellow users of AskWoody.  Without your information and advice, I wouldn’t have tried installing KB4013718.

      Best regards,

      Charles

      Win 7 Pro SP1, Intel PRO/wireless 3945ABG network connection, Intel Core 2 Duo CPU @1.80 GHz

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by  cesmart4125.
      • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by  cesmart4125.
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    • #196089 Reply

      samak
      AskWoody Lounger

      A curious thing happened when I checked for updates after installing KBs 4103712 and 4103768 and rebooting. I was offered “2018-03 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB4088875)” as Important but unchecked and “2018-04 Preview of Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB4093113)” as Optional but unchecked. I hid both.
      I have gone back and checked that the Feb, Mar and April updates are all showing up in installed updates so I don’t understand why these were offered to me at all.

      Otherwise all OK (Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller) and PC seems to be running normally.

      W7 SP1 Home Premium 64-bit, Office 2010, Group B, non-techie

    • #196097 Reply

      Bill C.
      AskWoody Lounger

      Win7Pro-64_SP1 on Intel DX58SO2 MB with i7-960.  On board NIC Intel 82567LF-2.  No wireless.  Group B for Monthly Security Only and IE11.

      Finished the final step of the May patching with Group B KB4103712 Monthly Security Only patch for AMD64..  I backed up the Inf folder and the NIC drivers just in case and had the Intel ProSet Install file available.  The KB4103712 install was uneventful.  IE Monthly Security only had been updated last week without issue.  Office 2010 and .NET was updated via WU.

      Thanks to all who took point this month and thanks for Woody, Susan Bradley, PKCano and all the others who shared their info, expertise and experiences.

       

      May also brought an iOS update to version 11.4.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #196098 Reply

      KarenS
      AskWoody Lounger

      @drbonzo that is encouraging indeed. Both PC’s have Windows 7 Home x64 and are Group A Both have an Antheros AR8152/8158 PCI-E Fast Ethernet Controller (NDIS 6.20). The PC that has the Antheros adapter has an Antheros AR9285 Wireless Adapter. I am still really scared about this update (which is the only one that is outstanding on both PC’s) because repairing the situation if something goes wrong is way beyond my comprehension even though I have read the instructions that are posted.

      UPDATE: Since making this post I have bit the bullet, held my breath, prayed for all I was worth and installed KB4103718 on both the PC’s with the Realtec and the Antheros wireless and thank the Good Lord above all seems to be running as it should on both. Thank you so much once again to the experts here on Woody’s, especially DrBonzo and others for posting about specific systems and their results with similar ones to ours. They gave me to courage to take that leap and install the update. Now I can breathe again and not worry about updates for at least a month. WHEW!!! Heavens knows what MS will release for June and I’m scared to find out!

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 5 days ago by  KarenS.
      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #196123 Reply

      anonymous

      Hi Guys ‘n’ gals,

      A quick ?, re; SueW’s previous post on the .NET question on the 4th.
      Sue posted the following…

      Security and Quality Rollup
      The Security and Quality Rollup is recommended for consumer and developer machines. It includes both security and quality improvements and is cumulative, meaning that it contains all of the updates from previous rollups. This makes it easy to catch up if you have missed any of the previous updates.

      My Q?

      Does this mean that I/We can safely UN-install all the old .NET updates?
      I have a heap dating back to 2015 & I’m sure that you all do as well.
      Maybe even older?
      Anyway, just asking if it’s safe to remove all the old c**p.

      Thank you.
      & thanks to Woody & crew for keeping us all “up-to-date.”

      Regs, Mike..
      WIN7, 32 bit, HP, Group “B”.
      ps. KB7103718 installed no probs, but KB4099633….Failed twice.
      I did not try to install it again.

      • #196132 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        You do not need to uninstall the old patches.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #196135 Reply

          anonymous

          Hi PKCano,

          Many thanks for the reply.
          I just thought that they may be taking up valuable space.
          Q?…Are they just listed as in “Update History”, so that we know what is installed?

          Thank you.
          Regs, Mike..

          • #196144 Reply

            PKCano
            AskWoody MVP

            Update History is not what’s currently installed on your computer necessarily. It is history – if Windows Update installed something, then you uninstall it, the uninstall doesn’t show in the history. It is a history of “what has been” in WU.

            To see what is currently installed, look under “View installed updates” (lower left corner of Windows Update). To make it easier to find, you can sort by one column (name or date) by clicking on the title bar of the col. (like in Excel).

      • #196149 Reply

        anonymous

        Hello Anonymous – Mike, if you want to clean the old stuff off your drive then you want to run Microsoft’s “Disk Cleanup”, press the “Clean up System Files” button, and see about removing the “old MS updates and Previous Windows version OS” (some people are afraid of Disk Cleanup but it IS from MS and every Windows version has it). If you do run it, reboot afterwards.

        Please note that there have been times that we have run Disk Cleanup, windows update files and old Windows Versions and the reboot took up to 45 minutes to complete. Usually it is not that long, maybe 5 to 8 minutes, but we have seen 45 minutes!

        We too, got worried but we left it alone and it finally made it to the Desktop.

        Just reboot, sit back and wait. It is finalizing the cleanup at that moment and it does take time to complete.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #196156 Reply

      anonymous

      Win7 Pro SP1, HP dc7900 SFF using Intel 82567LM-3 Gigabit Network Connection

      Made image, made rescue media with Acronis True Image.  Created a restore point.  Did the disk cleanup.

      I am in Group A and just updated with KB4099633, KB4103718, KB890830.  Avoided KB2952664.  All went without incident and NIC appears golden.  Phew!  I did reboot 3 times then did disk cleanup again and will now let the dc7900 do its thing for a couple hours before really putting it back to work.

      Will assess for a couple days and then update second dc7900 and an old eMachines netbook with Win7 Starter.

      Thank yous to Woody, Susan, PK, Noel and  and the many Loungers for such an excellent forum for sharing!!

    • #196205 Reply

      EP
      AskWoody Lounger

      woody:

      My Windows 7 machines are still being offered some older & redundant IE11 updates from Windows Update like KB3185319 and/or KB3175443, even if I had either KB4103718 or KB4103768 installed on these machines.

      Seems like the Windows Update “supersedence” metadata chain for Win7 is partly “broken” again, even with these new Win7 updates installed.

    • #196234 Reply

      anonymous

      My desktop was locally built with Haswell chip, win 7 home x64 and Intel NIC (Intel Ethernet Connection I217-V), and the laptop is by Dell with Intel NIC (Intel Centrino Wireless-N 2230), Win 7 x64.
      For .NET update I have not decided if I want to install KB4099633, 2018-05 Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework, which can be install via WU or manually via Catalog Update, or KB4099637, 2018-05 Security Only Update for .NET Framework, also available via Catalog Update. From the Catalog update for KB4099633, after clicking the “Download”, a window will pop up and in this window there is a list of files available for download. Currently both my machines run .NET Framework 4.5.1, so I will select the file assigned for 4.5.1 and download this file. However, in the list there is file and the file name is:
      “msipathregfix-amd64_5011cb29b096fb674a4795ee8fc2f7fdad33863a.exe”.
      Do I need to download and install this file also? And, if I have to, does it matter which file I install first?
      (I could install KB4099633 via Windows Update, and let MS decides)
      From Catalog update for KB4099637, after clicking “Download”, in the listed files available for download there is also this file:
      “msipathregfix-amd64_5011cb29b096fb674a4795ee8fc2f7fdad33863a.exe”, same file name as the one listed for KB4099633.
      Same question, if I elect to install KB4099637, Security only update for .NET Framework for May, 2018, do I need to download and install this file? Also, if I have to, which file I have to install first?
      Thank y’all in advanced for your help, CH

      • #196244 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        It’s a lot easier to install .NET through Windows Update.

        To download from the catalog
        Instead of clicking “Download”, click on the file name in the title column.
        It will open a popup – click on “More Information” on the right.
        In the Information page, scroll down and see which patch(s) is/are for your version(s).
        Go back to the first screen in the Catalog, click download, and download the patch(s) you need.

        Edit to make patch(s) and version(s) plural (in the event you have more than one).

        • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by  PKCano.
        • #196452 Reply

          anonymous

          Nice answer PKCano. Well said.

          The only other item is that since windows 7 has .NET 3.5.1 pre installed for the OS, he may need the ones for 3.5.1 and 4.5.1/4.5.2 from the catalog.

           

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #196456 Reply

            PKCano
            AskWoody MVP

            Guess I should have put an “s” on version(s). Well, yeah, you’ve got to know what you’re patching.

            • #196467 Reply

              anonymous

              Hi PKC, yes version(s) would do. And so true, in Group B one has to know what they are patching.

              By the way I can not find anything on that odd file:
              “msipathregfix-amd64_5011cb29b096fb674a4795ee8fc2f7fdad33863a.exe”

              Do you have any ideas?

            • #196503 Reply

              PKCano
              AskWoody MVP

              My guess is it’s an .exe file that executes when the update is installed (like the pciclear did with KB4099950). If it’s been bundled with the .NET for a long time, it may have something to do with the d3dcompiler that caused problems for Win7 when .NET 4.7 (or 4.7.1?) first came out. Look and see if it’s been there for maybe a year(?) since then.

    • #196245 Reply

      anonymous

      Windows 7 SP1 64bit, with Broadcom network card.

      Just installed; Security only KB4103712, IE11 KB4103768, KB4099637 which had Security Only update for .NET Framework 3.5.1 (KB 4095514).

      Installed IE11, first, Windows So 2nd, the 3.5.1 SO .Net 3rd. from catalog. MSRT installed last from WU.

      Installed one at a time. The .net required a reboot so that means it had a file in the OS that was in use.

      No network issues.

      Rebooted 3 times and let it sit for several minutes. The .NET was running mscorsvw.exe. The .NET image will be rebuilt after every .NET update and this will make your computer slow. You can 1) let the computer sit for 30 to 40 minutes, or 2) run the command manually from an admin command prompt. See MS Blog below.
      http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dotnet/archive/2013/08/06/wondering-why-mscorsvw-exe-has-high-cpu-usage-you-can-speed-it-up.aspx

      Thanks to all here.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #196258 Reply

      jburk07
      AskWoody Lounger

      Group A, Win7 Home Premium 64-bit SP1, Intel Ivy Bridge, with NICs Intel Centrino Wireless-N 2230 and Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller (for the wired connection).

      I installed the rollup KB4103718 this afternoon after making the usual Macrium image backup (and also backing up the NIC drivers as explained by Bob99, thank you!), and I’m happy to report that both the wireless and the wired connections are working fine so far. What a relief. I also installed the Office updates and the MSRT, but I’ll wait till tomorrow before getting the .NET KB4099633 update done.

      Thanks as always to Woody, Susan Bradley, PKCano, Kirsty, Noel, and all of you generous Loungers who have posted your results and advice to help the rest of us along. This month was even scarier than usual, but I felt mentally prepared with backup plans after reading all of the good information here. Good luck to everyone in getting through another month.

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 5 days ago by  jburk07. Reason: added 64-bit
      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #196288 Reply

      anonymous

      I had went through the exercise you mentioned and I did not  find the information for the question I asked. As I said, I could install the update, KB4099633, via WU and let MS decides. Anyway, I really appreciate your time and response, thanks PK.

      • #196572 Reply

        anonymous

        You wrote:

        As I said, I could install the update, KB4099633, via WU and let MS decide

        Yes, strongly recommend you do this.

        Imho manually updating .NET frameworks via catalog downloads is a royal pain–a largely unnecessary royal pain (which is why .NET updates are not part of Group B). As PKCano correctly replied earlier, it’s a lot easier to install .NET updates through Windows Update.

        And yes, I do understand that .NET patches–although usually not problematic–are not entirely immune from having issues. So suggest you continue to follow discussions here on AskWoody to learn of any issues that might arise with these patches. Then, when Woody publishes his monthly patch commentary in Computerworld and raises his MS-Defcon level, you’ll have a reasonable understanding of any .NET patch issues that have been discovered and how they might affect you(r system)–and you’ll be able to make a well-informed decision as to whether you should install the potentially-problematic .NET patch, or maybe hold off on installing the .NET patch till new info is received, a subsequent stable .NET rollup is released, etc.

        Hope this helps.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #196343 Reply

      anonymous

      Many thanks to PKCano & anonymous for the info. re; cleaning out the old MS Updates etc.

      It did find quite a few old/er files that it regarded as not needed.

      Regards, Mike..

    • #196490 Reply

      James Bond 007
      AskWoody Lounger

      Group B, Windows 7 / Windows 8.1 x64.

      All my Windows systems have been updated to May 2018 level, including the Windows 7 x64 systems which previously had stayed at December 2017 level for the past 5 months. But I still keep the December 2017 system images in case I need or want to roll back.

      I installed the Windows 7 updates in the following order :

      KB4054176 (.NET 3.5.1 Security only update for Jan 2018)
      KB4054172 (.NET 4.5.2 Security only update for Jan 2018)
      KB4056897 (Security only update for Jan 2018), Reboot
      KB4074587 (Security only update for Feb 2018), Reboot
      KB4099950 (Fix NIC problems)
      KB4088878 (Security only update for Mar 2018), Do not Reboot
      KB4099467 (Fix Stop Error when logout), Reboot
      KB4093108 (Security only update for Apr 2018), Reboot
      KB4095514 (.NET 3.5.1 Security only update for May 2018)
      KB4095519 (.NET 4.5.2 Security only update for May 2018)
      KB4103768 (IE11 Cumulative Security update for May 2018), Reboot
      KB4103712 (Security only update for May 2018), Reboot

      The systems appear to be working fine afterwards.

      Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #196491 Reply

      willygirl
      AskWoody Lounger

      Group A, Win7 SP1 x64, Office 2010, Toshiba PC
      Just finished installing May Rollup, MSRT, then Office 2010 updates after reboot. When Office was done installing I did a reboot twice based on what I’ve read here at the lounge, and everything is working fine. Thank you Woody and friends, love you all !!

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #196495 Reply

      anonymous

      On a Win7 Pro x64. I didn’t ask for it, nor my IT but in the past 2 weeks my computer is trying to install Win10 1607, 1703 and 1709

      https://i.imgur.com/imaPyZF.jpg

      6 users thanked author for this post.
      • #196538 Reply

        CADesertRat
        AskWoody Lounger

        I assume that you have WU set to auto. Out of curiosity do you have KB 2952664 installed? That is an upgrade helper from W7 to W10. With all of these forced upgrades that MS has been putting out, they may be starting up the old GWX program again.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #196541 Reply

        anonymous

        Anonymous, CADesertRat is correct. You should to see if updates are on auto and you need to see if several patches were installed and consider removing them in “installed updates” section of Programs and Features.

        These are the ones I have (from woody’s) to avoid.

        KB2952664/KB3150513
        KB3021917
        KB3022345
        KB3068708
        KB3080149

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #197391 Reply

        anonymous

        Just sharing some information, I have Win 7 Pro sp1 x64 and still have GWX Control Panel installed.  It does not seem to be any problem,  and here are some links to check if maybe you would want to consider using it: =

        https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/windows-10-gwx-control-panel.html

        http://blog.ultimateoutsider.com/2015/08/using-gwx-stopper-to-permanently-remove.html

        • #197427 Reply

          geekdom
          AskWoody Lounger

          I keep GWX Control Panel installed as well; it seems like cheap insurance with no dark side. There have been several reports of GWX unauthorized, attempted installation.

          Group G{ot backup} Win7|64-bit|SP1

          • #197506 Reply

            CADesertRat
            AskWoody Lounger

            I also never uninstalled GWX Control Panel, it’s still in place. I thought about uninstalling it many times but thankfully I never got around to it.

      • #197495 Reply

        anonymous

        also note that steve gibson provided a similar program called  never10.  our own woody da boss wrote about both  gwx control panel  and  never10  back in  march 2016:

        https://www.computerworld.com/article/3049165/microsoft-windows/steve-gibsons-never10-vs-josh-mayfields-gwx-control-panel.html

        https://www.grc.com/never10.htm

        is anyone else seeing win 10 trying to install on win 7 ?

    • #196515 Reply

      HiFlyer
      AskWoody Lounger

      @anon #196495

      “On a Win7 Pro x64. I didn’t ask for it, nor my IT but in the past 2 weeks my computer is trying to install Win10 1607, 1703 and 1709”

      Intriguing: I hope a techie on AW supplies an answer.  I can’t.

      More detail would be needed:  WU settings, How you get the updates etc.

      Anything you could add to help an analysis

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #197016 Reply

      anonymous

      I had disabled updates a couple of months back for Microsoft Office 2013 because of a reported issue, and I cannot if the top of my head remember what it was.  Does anyone know if it would be safe to re-enable automatic updating for Office 2013?  Are there any outstanding issues there?

      Apart from that, I have updated my Windows 7, except that instead of KB4103718, I did the security-only patches KB4103768, and KB4103712.   I’ll wait to see if a future roll up solves the network card problems.  I don’t want to risk the possibility of the network card being affected.  The other patches, KB890830 and KB4099633, I updated normally with no problems.

    • #197430 Reply

      HiFlyer
      AskWoody Lounger

      May Group B updates completed on 3 laptops.  All SOQU & IE11 downloaded from AKB2000003, other updates from WU.  No problems with any Net Adapters

      PC1.  Win8.1×64 SOQU, IEll, .NetSQRU plus 5 checked important (office2010, flash, msrt etc)

      All went smoothly no problems.

      PC2.  Win7 AMD SP1x64, Broadcomm802.11g Net Adapter.

      SOQU installed o.k.

      IE114103768 hung for 15 minutes while configuring but finally finished.  This  is an 11 year old laptop with 3gb ram. All seems o.k.

      PC3.  Win7SP1x64 AMD, Broadcomm Net Adapter

      IE11 KB4103768 installed reboot appeared o.k.

      SOQU KB4103712 appeared to be installed o.k. .  Reboot failed.  Several failures of boot up at “windows starting” notice.

      Tried restore system.   No success.

      Tried “repair computer”  2 times.  Report all o.k. except for a bad update.

      Started in safe mode (no CMD)  soon got notice “failure of update to configure,  reverting pending operations”.

      After a short time Windows started and now works o.k.  Apparently both the May SOQU and IE11 were removed.  They are not on the “installed updates” list.

      Don’t know if I should try those updates again, or wait for a good SMQR(ollup)  next month, or????

      Any ideas?

      • #197442 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        I have to ask the obvious question. Did you have the right bitedness?
        Run sfc /scannow – see if there are any problems.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #197450 Reply

        Bob99
        AskWoody Lounger

        @hiflyer

        If sfc returns no errors and you do have the correct bittedness per @pkcano‘s suggestions just above, try this for PC#3:

        You could’ve somehow gotten a bad copy of either update when you went to grab them from the Catalog, so delete both of them and try re-downloading them from the Catalog. Now do the following in the order listed:

        1. Install KB4103712 FIRST and BY ITSELF with NO other updates being installed at the same time. This goes for anti-malware programs as well. No definition update installs while this is being installed.

        After it says it’s finished being installed, open up Task Manager and click on the “Processes” tab, and make sure the checkbox for “Show processes from all users” is checked. You may get a User Account Control prompt while doing this. Go ahead and accept it, because you do want to see all running processes for this part. Once you have it up and running, click on the “CPU” heading in the window. This should arrange the processes from those running the most at the top of the list to those running the least at the bottom of the list. If it doesn’t, just click the heading again and it will show them this way.

        2. Once the only running process is “System Idle Process” running at 99 percent, and all the other processes are shown running at zero percent fairly consistently, go ahead close the Task Manager window (just use the red ‘X’ in upper right corner) and reboot your computer, using the “Restart” option from the shut down menu.

        3. Wait for 10-15 minutes after your computer gets back up to the desktop in order to let EVERYTHING finish initializing, and then install the IE rollup, KB4103768, again, by itself with NO other updates installing at the same time including signature updates.

        Use the same procedure as before, and monitor the running processes until “System Idle Process” is the only running process and then reboot just as before.

        4. Hopefully (fingers and toes crossed) you’ll reboot back to the desktop instead of a failed install.

        Let us know how things go!

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #197464 Reply

      HiFlyer
      AskWoody Lounger

      @pkcano and Bob99;

      Thanks for your replies.  I’ll answer within 24 hours.  It’s 2300 here in EU.

       

    • #197637 Reply

      HiFlyer
      AskWoody Lounger

      Re: my post #197430 above which described problems with May Gp. B updates.

      @pkcano re: your post#197442.  I had downloaded the correct (x64) Gp B updates for May from AKB2000003 (SOQU KB4103712 and IE11cumulative KB4103768).

      sfc /scannow was run today with no problems found.

      @bob99 re: your post#197450.  I followed your outstanding guidance carefully.

      1.  Downloaded (again) both GpB updates, this time from MUC.

      2.  Installed SOQU ……3712, rebooted.  It installed without a hitch.

      3.  Waited till System Idle Process was stable at 90% and all others 0%.

      4.  Clicked to install IE11cumulative…..3768 but got notice it was already installed!

      5.  Searched for it on WU “Installed Updates” and this time found it.

      (yesterday “View Update History” indicated it was installed successfully but the “Installed Updates” did not find it (2 searches).

      Thanks to your combined help the updates succeeded smoothly.  Many thanks once more.

      HF

       

       

       

       

       

      • This reply was modified 4 days, 9 hours ago by  HiFlyer.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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