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  • My Dell XPS with an i7-6700K HAS TPM 2.0–what to do

    Home » Forums » AskWoody support » Windows » My Dell XPS with an i7-6700K HAS TPM 2.0–what to do

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    #2396985

    My 2017 Dell XPS has an i7-6700K which is still an OK processor. AND I just checked based on Woody’s newsletter this week and it shows I have TPM 2.0.

    If I use the registry hack mentioned, would TPM 2.0 be active? Because the registry hack is multipurpose–in this case I need it to allow installation on an unsupported processor, but I don’t want it to not take advantage of the TPM 2.0 built into the machine.

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    • #2396989

      You don’t need to use the hack, you can just install it on a supported platform.

      Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2396994

      –in this case I need it to allow installation on an unsupported processor,

      The registry tweak only bypasses the pre-installation checks, so TPM 2.0 would not be disabled or downgraded.

      Windows 10 Pro version 21H2 build 19044.1387 + Microsoft 365 (group ASAP)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2397102

      Thanks, Susan, I do need the hack because it’s an i7-6700K which the W11 compatibility test software says is unsupported.

      Thanks, b, for explaining that the hack is only active during install…that is great news!

      My son and I can use our audio/video editing machines well into the future!

    • #2397114

      My son and I can use our audio/video editing machines well into the future!

      You should read the fine print :

      “Microsoft recommends against installing Windows 11 on a device that does not meet the Windows 11 minimum system requirements. If you choose to install Windows 11 on a device that does not meet these requirements, and you acknowledge and understand the risks, you can create the following registry key values and bypass the check for TPM 2.0 (at least TPM 1.2 is required) and the CPU family and model…”

      “This PC doesn’t meet the minimum system requirements for running Windows 11 – these requirements help ensure a more reliable and higher quality experience. Installing Windows 11 on this PC is not recommended and may result in compatibility issues. If you proceed with installing Windows 11, your PC will no longer be supported and won’t be entitled to receive updates. Damages to your PC due to lack of compatibility aren’t covered under the manufacturer warranty.

      https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/installing-windows-11-on-devices-that-don-t-meet-minimum-system-requirements-0b2dc4a2-5933-4ad4-9c09-ef0a331518f1

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2397125

      Thanks, Alex!

      So, other than an unsupported processor (i7-6700K) my machine meets all the other minimum requirements.
      24 GB of RAM
      5 TB of SSD (1 TB NVme, 2×2 TB SATA)
      UFEI boot
      TPM 2.0
      Not certain about the graphics cards
      3×23″ 1920×1080 displays
      Currently running Win10 20H2 and currently updating to 21H1.

      As to warranty, it’s 4 years old and out of warranty.

      You can see why I’m loathe to change computers. I guess I can run Win10 to some point into the future, but I am frustrated with Microsoft obsoleting reasonably useful equipment.

    • #2397144

      but I am frustrated with Microsoft obsoleting reasonably useful equipment.

      Your ancient 6th gen Intel CPU lack some new security components utilized by Windows 11.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2397160

      Hi, Alex,

      It seems that the i7-6700K is raising a bit of an uproar. I’m not certain whether or not my TPM 2.0 is via the processor or a separate chip, but my Dell Studio XPS 8910 is reporting TPM 2.0 enabled.

      The tpm.msc utility says “The TPM is ready for use….Manufacturer Name: INTC…Specification Version: 2.0”

      So, I’m guessing Dell thought ahead and installed a separate module when I purchased the machine.

      Other than the TPM, what other features are lacking from the i7-6700K. I am interested as it seems you are discouraging me from doing this upgrade and simply buying a new machine. Well, I did replace an older i5-2400 machine (from 2011) and still haven’t transferred the entire configuration. While the i7-6700K machine (from 2017) isn’t quite as complex as the i5 machine, it will still take days to configure and may require some begging and pleading with software vendors to allow me to install the software I’m currently using without a hassle.

      Thanks!

    • #2397353

      Thanks, Alex! That makes it clear, but I see their point of view as well. I guess I have until October 2025 to replace these machines or see what happens. They are rock stable. I’ve had no BSDs that I can recall on mine.

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