• My tech journey started here and I’m still hooked. How about you?

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    • This topic has 15 replies, 11 voices, and was last updated 3 months ago.
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    #2605806

    2023-11-22-IBM-PC

    Custom desktop Asus TUF X299 Mark 1 16GB RAM i7-7820X
    Four 27" 1080p screens 2 over 2.
    Laptop Clevo/Sager i7-9750H - 17.3" Full HD 1080p 144Hz, 16GB RAM Win 10 Pro 22H2

    • This topic was modified 3 months ago by TechTango.
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    • #2605813

      My journey started with an IBM PC-XT, which was a year or so before the PC-AT. We had Wang Word Processors before the IBM PCs, but they probably weren’t classified as computers.

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    • #2605831

      I started with the Timex-Sinclair TS-1000, then moved to the Commodore 64, then the Commodore 128, and in 1990 to my first PC, which was also my first self-built PC, a model based on the Intel 80386 (386) at 33 MHz. How many PCs I have had since then is not something I can answer, as I have no idea how to define when a PC is upgraded enough to became a new PC. It’s a lot, though. I still have about a dozen of them (only counting the ones in working order).

      Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, KDE Neon
      XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/32GB & GTX1660ti, KDE Neon
      Acer Swift Go 14, i5-1335U/16GB, KDE Neon (and Win 11)

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      • #2605842

        Interesting comments.  I also had a 386 and 486 then Intel’s first Pentium CPU with the flaw that caused a huge bruhaha.  Cratered Intel stock.

        Custom desktop Asus TUF X299 Mark 1 16GB RAM i7-7820X
        Four 27" 1080p screens 2 over 2.
        Laptop Clevo/Sager i7-9750H - 17.3" Full HD 1080p 144Hz, 16GB RAM Win 10 Pro 22H2

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2606093

          We are Pentium of Borg. Division is futile. You will be approximated.

          Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, KDE Neon
          XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/32GB & GTX1660ti, KDE Neon
          Acer Swift Go 14, i5-1335U/16GB, KDE Neon (and Win 11)

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    • #2605849

      My tech journey started with a teletype interface for a timeshare IBM mainframe running 5-baud paper tape for programming in the early ’70’s. My personal tech journey started with a Texas Instruments TI99/4A using a 13″ black and white TV for a monitor and a cassette tape deck for file storage.

      TI-99-4A

      I wrote a program in basic for balancing my checkbook and monitoring my household budget.  Had a couple of game cartridges as well.

      Always create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates; you may need to start over!
      We were all once "Average Users". We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do with our systems, we don't need anyone's approval, and we don't all have to do the same things.

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    • #2605988

      The first personal computer I ever sat down at was an original IBM-PC that a friend had bought. He had a program for people who wanted to learn how to type. In 2-3 weeks, my typing improved more than it did in the whole semester of typing class I’d had in high school.

       

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    • #2605993

      I started with Commodore 64 back around 1984 (?)
      Have a trip down memory lane re-discovering your old computer, console or software you used to have.”
      https://www.old-computers.com/museum/default.asp
      There are actually 1287 systems in the museum.

      And a nice free portable typing tutor program:
      https://portableapps.com/apps/education/typefaster_portable

      A smile is an inexpensive way to change your looks.
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      • #2606079

        Old computers museum site is a hoot!

        Custom desktop Asus TUF X299 Mark 1 16GB RAM i7-7820X
        Four 27" 1080p screens 2 over 2.
        Laptop Clevo/Sager i7-9750H - 17.3" Full HD 1080p 144Hz, 16GB RAM Win 10 Pro 22H2

    • #2605997

      I worked with a System series 1 computers and NCR 315, at work in 1968.
      My first personal computer was Dragon 32

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    • #2606045

      I got started with and IBM 360 and PL/1. Caught the but and got on the PC bandwagon with a TRS-80 Model 1 upon its debut (Don’t call it a Trash-80 near me you’ll get an ear full). Moved on to an Osborne 1 then an IBM PC/AT and many more after that.

      My obsession changed from a Vocation to an Avocation early on and I’m still going strong!

      May the Forces of good computing be with you!

      RG

      PowerShell & VBA Rule!
      Computer Specs

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2606301

      First was a Dragon32 – CoCo/ TRS-80 clone with an external cassette player, which took an AGE to load anything decent or otherwise!

      Some games and programs were manually typed in over days with text provided by subscription magazine freebies.
      These had the usual multiple line errors (some my own typo’s..ahem)
      then didn’t work lol.
      The magazine would provide fixes in the next edition, yup, you guessed it, a month later for syntax errors, leaving much to be desired after eventually getting things to work.

      Some old tricks never change..with, or without magazines.

      Can’t say I miss the Dragon32 although it did work eight or so years ago on a short nostalgia trip and then promptly back into storage in it’s original polystyrene box within a vacpack bag where it’s been ever since.

      Wish I could have done that with my first car

      Win8.1/R2 Hybrid lives on...
      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2606370

      I started with a Timex-Sinclair TS1000, then a Commodore 64, and in 1984 moved into the IBM world with the IBM PC2 5150B, the second release of the seminal IBM PC. And here it is, still sitting on the shelf behind me.

      ibm5150

      Albeit, it’s been “modernized” with a RAM upgrade to 640KB, a half-height 20MB Seagate hard drive, MS-DOS 6.1, and half-height 360KB 5.25″ and 1.44MB 3.5″ floppy drives. The two original full-height 320KB floppy drives are sitting in a box in the closet.

      Many others have come and gone since, but I still have a soft spot for that old PC2. And yes, it still works! Not even a pesky CMOS battery to wear out. (You have to enter the date and time every time you boot.)

       

       

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      • #2606477

        I still have my Compaq Portable Plus (XT-class), a suitcase style luggable. I bought it in 1991 from a college friend to run my BBS upon. I ran the BBS for most of that year, on WWIV (World War Four) BBS software. Most of the users were fellow students, but not all.

        I had been using BBSs for years, and I am glad I got to run one for a brief time while they were still relevant.

        Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, KDE Neon
        XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/32GB & GTX1660ti, KDE Neon
        Acer Swift Go 14, i5-1335U/16GB, KDE Neon (and Win 11)

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2606431

      with a RAM upgrade to 640KB

      All you’ll ever need sayeth his highness B.G.

      May the Forces of good computing be with you!

      RG

      PowerShell & VBA Rule!
      Computer Specs

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2606483

      I used IBM PCs at work, so never got one at home. My first “computer” at home was an Amstrad CPC 464, and then the 6128, and then home consoles (Megadrive etc), until I finally got a laptop. Can’t recall what make, but it only had a b&w screen. When I finally got myself one with a colour screen (a Compaq, I think) it was so expensive back then that I had to take out a loan to get it

      Anyways, the thing that most strikes me about this thread is that it’s in the “Fun” Forum, and the thing that most strikes me about computing today is that it most assuredly ISN’T fun

      We have the large corporations (and governments) constantly trying to spy on us so that they can either sell us crud that we don’t want or just because they can, all the while pretending that they’re the good guys, when in many ways they’re as bad as the bad guys. And, we have the bad guys themselves forever looking for ways to steal our identities or deliver ransomware to our doorsteps or dip into our bank accounts to clear them out

      Games (which for me were the whole reason for getting into home computing) (and, with @Microfix I remember the days of typing in reams of code from a magazine, just to play the game for a minute or so before getting bored with it, even assuming you could get it to assemble and run in the first place) are no longer fun, because they’ve become big business too. Sure, the graphics are awesome and all, but they’re mostly built just to make money via microtransactions or whatever, and there’s something missing from the old days. Heart, and soul, I guess

      Mwah, I write my own nowadays using Unity, and try not to get too paranoid online, but, it really isn’t fun anymore

       

      (Also, those darn kids need to GET OFFA MY LAWN)

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