• NASA to crash spacecraft on asteroid next Monday: your taxes at work.

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    #2480926

    Next Monday NASA is crashing an expensive spacecraft on an inexpensive asteroid.
    (Or: Your taxes at work.)

    But watch this video, courtesy of the Wall Street Journey, and be scared, very scared.
    Watch it again, and be even more scared.

    https://www.wsj.com/video/series/news-explainers/nasas-dart-mission-will-test-earths-defenses-against-asteroids/3C2BF384-4335-45BA-BAF6-AE582A846E0C

    As a (foolish, but hey!) consolation about the cost of NASA’s crash, that things in the USA are not all that bad compare what it’s elsewhere, you can watch the video, that goes then on to cover the expense of the Japan Olympics, the most expensive ever, that was the equivalent quite a few billions of dollars, and got none of the expected revenues in compensation, because the games played to the empty expensive new facilities, as no one other than the athletes and other essential persons were allowed to go there, thanks to covid, and people wouldn’t or be allowed to travel to Japan for the same reason.

    And then there is the video on how much the British Monarchy costs the Brits: a few dollars per year per head. But Charles, now the King, has been promising to cut this cost considerably.

    And other expensive issues involving taxpayers money somewhere.

    And then about the leaky NASA’s Moon rocket.

    Etc., etc. Great show! If not as encouraging as one would prefer to watch to learn about how things are going in our world.

    Ex-Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7); since mid-2017 using also macOS. Presently on Monterey 12.15 & sometimes running also Linux (Mint).

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    • This topic was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by OscarCP.
    • This topic was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by OscarCP.
    • This topic was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by OscarCP.
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    • #2480938

      Yes I saw a tv program about this Nasa-Dart program. Indeed frightning when the rock is coming straight at us. I will try to watch the live show. Perhaps this link is about the same you provide above.

      https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2022/9/26/dart-mission-impacts-an-asteroid/

      Watch NASA Live from 3 to 4:30 p.m. PDT (6 to 7:30 p.m. EDT) to hear commentary from experts before and during the impact at Dimorphos. Images from DART, which will impact the asteroid at 4:14 p.m. PDT (7:14 p.m. EDT), will be streamed to Earth in real-time and shown during the broadcast.

      Follow along with the latest news and updates on the mission website.

      .

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      • #2480943

        The one I have linked in my opening comment here is an excellent Wall Street Journal video. The NASA article is a good one too, but I think the WJS one is better at explaining things and it is followed without interruption by the interesting reportage on the cost of the British Monarchy to the Brits, per head per annum; another on the huge loss to the Japanese National Treasury because of the combination of the most expensive ever Olympics there and the unhelpful effects of covid on the attendance to the games and consequent compensatory revenue, etc., etc. Fascinating watching, indeed.

        And, by the way, I think that the NASA mission to bump and asteroid is a very good idea, in case someone here thought I am against it because of its cost. Mine was a tongue-in-check commentary.

        Ex-Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7); since mid-2017 using also macOS. Presently on Monterey 12.15 & sometimes running also Linux (Mint).

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
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        • #2480945

          Quite right, perhaps I can see it live on tv.!

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        • #2480947

          And, by the way, I think that the NASA mission to bump and asteroid is a very good idea, in case someone here thought I am against it because of it cost. Mine was a tongue-in-check commentary.

          Why not make this an international responsibility , and share the costs? So people have a chance to save the world from going down ?

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          • #2481005

            Fred: “Why not make this an international responsibility , and share the costs? So people have a chance to save the world from going down ?

            Making asteroid redirection into an international project would be a good thing, when the time comes, but this is just about testing one idea of how to do it, to see if it works, and that is best done by a single organization, such as NASA. International cooperative agreements are not easy to arrange (and don’t I know that!), take time, may be stopped by all sorts of things, such as getting their shares of funding approved by the participating governments, something that depends on the politicians in their respective countries.
            Even if those negotiating are bound to be hit over the head by the same asteroid, were one to happen to come around and do that.

            Ex-Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7); since mid-2017 using also macOS. Presently on Monterey 12.15 & sometimes running also Linux (Mint).

            MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
            Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
            macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV

    • #2480941

      And then there is the video on how much the British Monarchy costs the Brits: a few dollars per year per head. But Charles, now the King, has been promising to cut this cost considerably.

      Ehhh, the Brittish pay in £ Brittish Pounds….
      This is a real renomated article about “The Firm”,
      Inside ‘The Firm’: How The Royal Family’s $28 Billion Money Machine Really Works
      https://www.forbes.com/sites/arielshapiro/2021/03/10/inside-the-firm-how-the-royal-familys-28-billion-money-machine-really-works/?sh=25f827642bcc
      Oranje Boven, as we say here.

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      • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by Fred.
      • #2480946

        Fred: “Ehhh, the Brittish pay in £ Brittish Pounds….

        Converted in the WJS video to dollars for us, who have trouble understanding foreign things like pounds.

        Ex-Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7); since mid-2017 using also macOS. Presently on Monterey 12.15 & sometimes running also Linux (Mint).

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV

    • #2480951

      Fred: “Ehhh, the Brittish pay in £ Brittish Pounds….

      Converted in the WJS video to dollars for us, who have trouble understanding foreign things like pounds.

      grin , smile

      * _ _ _ _ *
    • #2480984

      One British pound equals 1.13 U.S. dollars (today anyway).

      Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake as soon as you make it again.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2481006

        Wow! Charlie! You know so much for someone that still cannot be reached on PM!

        But OK, having said that, let’s get back to the NASA asteroid discombobulating mission.

        Ex-Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7); since mid-2017 using also macOS. Presently on Monterey 12.15 & sometimes running also Linux (Mint).

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV

      • #2481346

        One British pound equals 1.13 U.S. dollars (today anyway).

        UK £1 = US $1.09, parity will be reached sometime next week

        • #2481355

          Microfix: “parity will be reached sometime next week

          And everybody will blame Charles, because that is one of the things he’s King for, right?

          And: Wow! I had not even remotely realized how far down the $ <=> £ parity has gone!

          Well, looking at it on the bright side, now at least the imported Mash and Bangers and Spotted Dick will be cheaper here.

          One more thing to also look forward to, just as, on Monday, the very expensive NASA impactor vs. cheap (for free, actually) asteroid smash up.

          Ex-Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7); since mid-2017 using also macOS. Presently on Monterey 12.15 & sometimes running also Linux (Mint).

          MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
          Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
          macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV

    • #2481117

      And it looks like I just cannot get the Wall Street Journal name and acronym right! Oh, the Horror!

      But you’ll be able to see live, on your very own computer monitor, maybe even on your very TV screen, all of US taxpayers’ $308,000,000 crash on a small asteroid that all it has ever done is to orbit a bigger one and, together with it, follow good old Jupiter since for ever and, maybe soon, if this one is really redirected, those two asteroids will no longer have each other for company any more:

      https://www.cnet.com/science/space/nasas-dart-crash-how-to-watch-live-as-spacecraft-collides-with-asteroid/#:~:text=NASA%27s%20DART%20death%20is%20primetime%20viewing%20on%20Monday%2C,3%20p.m.%20PT%2F6%20p.m.%20ET%20via%20NASA%20TV.

      Quote:

      Our YouTube channel, CNET Highlights, will have two streams. The main livestream and a feed from the spacecraft’s DRACO camera. NASA notes that the feed will mostly be black once it switches on, but as the spacecraft approaches, the asteroid pair will come into view. It should be pretty thrilling.

      Here’s how that time translates to different zones:

      US: Sep. 26, 4:14 p.m. PT/7:14 p.m. ET
      Brazil: Sep. 26 , 8:14 p.m. (Federal District)
      UK: Sep. 26, 11:14 p.m.
      South Africa: Sep. 27, 1:14 a.m.
      Russia: Sep. 27, 2:14 a.m. (Moscow)
      United Arab Emirates: Sep. 27, 3:14 a.m.
      India: Sep. 27, 4:44 a.m.
      China: Sep. 27, 7:14 a.m.
      Japan: Sep. 27, 8:14 a.m.
      Australia: Sep. 27, 9:14 a.m. AEST

      Sounds awesome. Where can I find out more about DART?

      We’re glad you asked.

      When DART launched back in November 2021, CNET’s Monisha Ravisetti put together this handy explainer about the mission and its goals. The team at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory also has a ton of resources about the mission, including handy interactives and the latest updates.

      Make sure to check back here for the livestream links closer to launch and check out CNET Science for more space stories.

      First published on Sept. 20, 2022 at 9:45 p.m. PT.

      And more here:

      https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamiecartereurope/2022/09/22/when-and-where-to-watch-live-as-nasa-intentionally-crashes-a-spacecraft-into-an-asteroid-for-the-first-time/?sh=5d2e8fe22285

      Ex-Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7); since mid-2017 using also macOS. Presently on Monterey 12.15 & sometimes running also Linux (Mint).

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV

      • #2481322

        We the people DEMAND JUSTICE for this unprovoked asteroid assault!
        Please send you contributions to xxxscamgods@nowayjose.wag

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
    • #2481128

      I think that the NASA mission to bump and asteroid is a very good idea

      Agreed, since the last big one created the dinosaur extinction. Or so the theory goes…

      • #2481131

         

        JohnW: “Agreed, since the last big one created the dinosaur extinction. Or so the theory goes…

        True enough, except for the birds, that now are understood to be actual dinosaurs (and some even look like it). As mentioned in voiceover in this video on a story of a Florida man attacked by “the most dangerous bird in the world” he was keeping as a pet. The man died.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBM7AI0yp78

        And even more directly identifying birds and dinosaurs (some with very cute chicks):

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DK5azP5xJC0

        So the asteroid miss some. Also something of a mystery why the turtles survived.

        But, one would hope, “Dart” won’t miss its target on Monday. And might push it off its orbit around its bigger friend. For ever.

        (Wonder where then it might go? .. Oh, nooo!)

        Ex-Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7); since mid-2017 using also macOS. Presently on Monterey 12.15 & sometimes running also Linux (Mint).

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
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        macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV

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    • #2481257

      except for the birds, that now are understood to be actual dinosaurs (and some even look like it)

      How about this?

      Crows Are Self-Aware and Capable of Analytical Thought. Almost no other species has that kind of higher intelligence.

      https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/animals/a34165311/crows-are-self-aware-like-humans/

      • #2481271

        JohnW quoted: “Crows Are Self-Aware and Capable of Analytical Thought.

        Too bad they are not commenting here, in AskWoody. We’ll never know what we are missing.

        Ex-Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7); since mid-2017 using also macOS. Presently on Monterey 12.15 & sometimes running also Linux (Mint).

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV

    • #2481287

      JohnW quoted: “Crows Are Self-Aware and Capable of Analytical Thought.

      Too bad they are not commenting here, in AskWoody. We’ll never know what we are missing.

      Probably for the best, considering that a flock of crows is known as a “murder of crows”.

      https://bigthink.com/life/why-group-murder-of-crows/

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    • #2481321

      I thought this thread was about NASA and asteroids. Should these “crow posts” be removed?

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      • #2481348

        maybe someone is in the crows nest looking for the asteroid?

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      • #2481360

        PK: No, don’t do that, we’ll behave from now own. I swear.

        Ex-Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7); since mid-2017 using also macOS. Presently on Monterey 12.15 & sometimes running also Linux (Mint).

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV

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    • #2481837

      Thanks for this thread. I’ll dream about dinosaurs and crows coming out of their nests looking for asteroids.

      Win7 Home x64 MacOS Chromebook

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      • #2481847

        Thanks for this thread. I’ll dream about dinosaurs and crows coming out of their nests looking for asteroids.

        Perhaps, over here, we do not have to wait that long before Man is distict and the new dynosaurs will take over. That really will be a MYSTifing experience!  😇

        * _ _ _ _ *
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    • #2481967

      Myst,

      For some reason, after reading about that dream, this comes to mind:

      “Perched on the arc of silver of the moon,
      sings so very sweetly a nightingale”

      ….

      “To die, perhaps, is to continue a dream
      From moon to moon and from sun to sun.”

      Baldomero Fernández Moreno.
      (Translation from its Spanish original of the beginning and ending of this poem, © OscarCP 2022.)

      Now, more to the point, so as not to disturb PK unduly:

      Remember: the crash will be transmitted live from a small accompanying spacecraft tomorrow, starting at 7:14 PM USA’s East Daylight Time (so one hour later than normally, ahead of the Sun).

      Those more scientifically oriented can use this time, corrected by subtracting or adding an hour from it, and then corrected it further by counting and then subtracting or adding their sum (depending on if they are to my East or to my West) the number of the time zones the world is divided officially and unevenly into that lie between their neck of the woods and this one, always mindful of the International Time Line, that runs from pole to pole and sort of sneaks around in the Central Pacific Ocean.
      And also keeping in mind to make another half hour correction if you live in one of those places where local time is offset by half an hour from that in their own time zone.

      While the less scientifically minded can look a few comments above this one the times at various places on Earth when this once in a life time crash — and never for real and all-natural near you, one may always hope, takes place.

      Or else use some online time service showing the time at important cities in practically all countries and work out the difference with your own, as I do.

      Ex-Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7); since mid-2017 using also macOS. Presently on Monterey 12.15 & sometimes running also Linux (Mint).

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV

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    • #2482785

      Win7 Home x64 MacOS Chromebook

    • #2482793

      I find myself wondering if this project really did much more than prove some schoolboy physics. After all you have one shot.. literally. It took a while to get there as well – ideally you need something which is stationed and doesn’t need to accelerate to do its job..

      If I were going to attempt something, for one it would have to be on a far larger scale (literally) to deflect something earth threatening.

      What would I do? Look to creating a sat with a large bladder of water maintained in the liquid state either by suitable solar intervention or a nuclear reactor – really you’d want to work well away from this planet anyway and it wouldn’t be the first reactor up there..

      You could then fire high pressure pulses of water at the target (which might or might not be rotating..) to either transfer inertia to slow it with a central hit (as the water would turn to ice almost on leaving the source (so it would work best if the water left at the triple point as you want it to freeze before it boils due to the low pressure) and the resulting ice relegate with the pressure of impact, tending to adhere to the target so you could both slow the target by multiple shots or alter the balance of the object, potentially causing it to spiral and deviate from its course. If things got too bad a large thermal charge suitably placed could vaporise the ice to counter or generate a large push.

      The fun could be arranging a way to counter the recoil at the source craft as the water is “launched”..

       

       

      • #2483032

        Actually a gravity tractor might be the way to go. Many objects may not be entirely solid and given enough notice just having an object near the offending mass to pull it off its course would be enough.

        🍻

        Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
        • #2483057

          So actually if you missed the target it might still pull it off course then?

          I’d have thought you’d need a significant mass for that to work (as in space-time distorting, like a planet..), though the main idea on my part was you could ship up and store as much water as practical (over several missions) so you could also theoretically control the exit velocity of the water (low velocity at the start) to build up a suitable chunk of ice by accretion of subsequent discharges onto the initial release.

          I guess the other main idea might revolve on using the high iron content of some objects but that would be a gamble.. a bit like waiting until an icy target got close enough then trying to coat one side of it in vantablack to get it boiling off in the solar warmth to generate a shift..

    • #2483092

      So actually if you missed the target it might still pull it off course then?

      No the tractor idea is long term and way in advance of any impact. Especially useful in objects that are not solid as the the gravity pull would effect the whole where a ‘crash’ would just break stuff up.

      🍻

      Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
    • #2483221

      Did NASA managed to turn the Asteroid to crash on earth ?

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