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  • New : Parallels Desktop 15 for Mac

    Posted on Alex5723 Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Other platforms – for Windows wonks macOS for Windows wonks New : Parallels Desktop 15 for Mac

    This topic contains 16 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  OscarCP 2 days, 7 hours ago.

    • Author
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    • #1907242 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      https://www.parallels.com/blogs/parallels-desktop-15-tech-guarantee-2019/

      In Parallels Desktop 15, this is a must-have upgrade packed with 30+ new features and powerful graphics performance:

      Work Faster – Start Microsoft Office applications up to 80% faster
      Next-level Graphics – Up to 15% faster, plus support for DirectX 11 via Apple Metal*
      Be Productive – Drag and drop screenshot previews and email files right from Finder
      Get Creative – Support for Apple Pencil in Sidecar, Xbox One controller via Bluetooth, IRISPen and more
      Future-Proof – Ready for upcoming macOS Catalina and Windows releases …

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1907256 Reply

      PKCano
      Da Boss

      I have always run the latest version of Parallels on my Macs. But like Woody’s DEFCON, I give it a while after first release for the bugs to be worked out before I upgrade.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1907388 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      In case someone reads this feeling curious about what “Parallels Desktop” actually does but has never heard of it, as was my own case, and as the Web page with the link provided by Alex5723 does not offer an explanation of its general purpose, I have done a little research and found out this: it is an application for creating virtual machines (VMs) where one can run software other than the one native to the machine, for example running Windows applications on a Mac in a virtual machine where Windows has been installed. It is probably quite versatile, considering what actually says in that Web page and that PKCano uses it.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1907654 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      In case someone reads this feeling curious about what “Parallels Desktop” actually does but has never heard of it, as was my own case, and as the Web page with the link provided by Alex5723 does not offer an explanation of its general purpose, I have done a little research and found out this: it is an application for creating virtual machines (VMs) where one can run software other than the one native to the machine, for example running Windows applications on a Mac in a virtual machine where Windows has been installed. It is probably quite versatile, considering what actually says in that Web page and that PKCano uses it.

      There are 3 options to install Windows on a Mac :

      1. Install Windows wiping MacOS (many do this as they like Apple’s MacBook hardware)
      2. Use the build-in Boot Camp app. You need to reboot your computer to switch between the systems.
      3. 3rd party app like Parallels Desktop, VirtualBox.. which let you run both MacOS and Windows at the same time.

      More here : https://macpaw.com/how-to/install-windows-on-mac

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1909079 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      When I ran Windows on a Mac, I used Parallels as well (VMWare Fusion’s performance wasn’t as good, and Oracle VirtualBox was a little glitchy. Boot Camp was way too glitchy, although performance was g00d).

      The new version of Parallels looks good, and I’d go back to Parallels if I ever need to run Windows directly on my Mac. In the meantime, my work is having me RDP into a Windows VM for work purposes.

      Linux can also be installed on it (although the Mac has a UNIX Command Line), and I’ve occasionally done so to run a few Linux weather tools before I could get the source code to compile directly on Mac.

      Nathan Parker

      • #1910841 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Nathan: “Linux can also be installed on it (although the Mac has a UNIX Command Line), and I’ve occasionally done so to run a few Linux weather tools before I could get the source code to compile directly on Mac.

        I would be interested in the opposite use of Linux on a Mac VM, if compiling a program’s source code in the Linux VM produced an actual Linux-compatible executable: one that can be run on an actual Linux machine. Is that even possible? If it were, I would love to have Linux running on my Mac in this way. I recently had to create a Linux executable, and still not having Linux installed on my Windows 7 PC at the time, I had to ask a friend to find me a NASA Linux computer where I could log in remotely from home. I prefer not to have to bother people in this way, if possible.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1909336 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      What’s New in Parallels Desktop 15 for Mac

      Parallels 15 lands ready for macOS Catalina including Sidecar on iPad, DirectX 11 expands Windows game support using Apple Metal

      • This reply was modified 6 days, 5 hours ago by  Alex5723.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1910022 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      I have always run the latest version of Parallels on my Macs. But like Woody’s DEFCON, I give it a while after first release for the bugs to be worked out before I upgrade.

      It seems that some had the new version crash.

      https://9to5mac.com/2019/08/16/parallels-15-macos-catalina-support/

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1910931 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Nathan: “Linux can also be installed on it (although the Mac has a UNIX Command Line), and I’ve occasionally done so to run a few Linux weather tools before I could get the source code to compile directly on Mac.

      I would be interested in the opposite use of Linux on a Mac VM, if compiling a program’s source code in the Linux VM produced an actual Linux-compatible executable: one that can be run on an actual Linux machine. Is that even possible? If it were, I would love to have Linux running on my Mac in this way. I recently had to create a Linux executable, and still not having Linux installed on my Windows 7 PC at the time, I had to ask a friend to find me a NASA Linux computer where I could log in remotely from home. I prefer not to have to bother people in this way, if possible.

      If you run a Linux VM on your Mac through Parallels, VMWare Fusion, or Oracle VirtualBox (Parallels and VMWare Fusion costs, Parallels has the best performance although VMWare Fusion has better support for moving a VM to a Windows PC; VirtualBox is free if you simply don’t want to pay for VM software), then it’s the equivalent of having a physical Linux PC in your office, with the exception of the VM is set using the specs you assign to it and running on top of the Mac, so it could be slightly slower than a dedicated Linux PC. However, for everything I’ve ever done on Linux, Linux on a VM on a Mac was plenty of fast enough.

      Since a Mac has UNIX underpinnings, I’ve occasionally been able to re-compile the code directly on the Mac using Xcode’s Command Line Tools, MacPorts, and X11, so I could run the Linux apps I needed directly on the Mac. For the times I haven’t been able to though, Linux in a VM works.

      I’ve successfully done so with Ubuntu, Fedora, CentOS, and RHEL.

      Nathan Parker

      • #1911022 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks, Nathan, Let me rephrase my question: If I run Linux on a VM and compile the source code of a program in there, let’s say written in C++ or in Fortran, would I get the resulting executable in a binary compatible with Linux, so it can be run “as is” on a real Linux computer, or would I get a regular Mac binary that, being from a Mac, cannot be run on a Linux computer, as I know only too well?

        I would like to develop software on the Mac and then create, somehow, executables for Linux machines, so I can send that to colleagues in joint projects. At present, I can do that with my Windows 7 PC, because it has Linux installed in dual-boot with Windows. It would be nice to be able to do that also with the Mac, so I can shuttle work, as convenient, between the two machines without having to skip a beat. Otherwise, I’ll just make do by compiling all I need to make compatible with Linux on the PC while running Linux. So: not a major issue, but an interesting one for me all the same.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1911079 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      If I run Linux on a VM and compile the source code of a program in there, let’s say written in C++ or in Fortran, would I get the resulting executable in a binary compatible with Linux, so it can be run “as is” on a real Linux computer, or would I get a regular Mac binary that, being from a Mac, cannot be run on a Linux computer, as I know only too well?

      Anything you compile inside the Linux VM itself would be a real Linux app that could be moved to a real Linux PC. It wouldn’t even execute on the Mac side unless you took the source code itself and re-compiled it directly on the Mac (and even then, I’ve only gotten it to work after installing Xcode command line tools, MacPorts, X11, and doing some hefty tweaking).

      So if you install a Linux VM on your Mac, everything inside the Linux VM, including development tools and compiled apps, are real Linux and totally different from your Mac. It’s the equivalent of setting a Linux PC on your desk, just you’re accessing it contained in a file versus its own hardware. It’s the same with installing Windows on a Mac. It’ll do exactly what you’re looking at doing.

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1911120 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Nathan: “Anything you compile inside the Linux VM itself would be a real Linux app that could be moved to a real Linux PC. It wouldn’t even execute on the Mac side unless you took the source code itself and re-compiled it directly on the Mac.

      Thank you so very much for this information! For me, it is a really good thing to know this is at all possible!

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1911139 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Thank you so very much for this information! For me, it is a really good thing to know this is at all possible!

      Glad to assist. Parallels would give you the most performance, but if you wanted to get your feet wet for free, you can try Oracle VirtualBox. I like the polish of Parallels better, but VirtualBox is functional for free. VMWare’s performance isn’t as good as Parallels, but the VM’s are easier to move to a Windows PC if need be.

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1911180 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        One more, related question: How easily can one move files from the Mac to the Linux VM and back, ASCII files in particular? One way I can imagine might work would be to plug an USB pen drive on the Mac and access its contents by opening the USB main directory from inside the Linux VM. And, in the same way, pass ASCII files and others, such as PDFs, GIFs, JPEGs, etc. (that can be used equally well under either OS) from the Linux VM to the Mac. Would that really work as described? Even if it does work, is there an even simpler way?

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #1911194 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          I looked for answers to my question on the Web and found these two topics with relevant information others might be interested to know about as well:

          For VMWare:

          https://pubs.vmware.com/fusion-5/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.vmware.fusion.help.doc%2FGUID-3C0EA5DA-98DD-4835-9C84-354472B25303.html

          For VirtualBox:

          Permanently share a folder between host (Mac) and guest (Linux) OS using VirtualBox

          But, all the same, I also would like to know if the USB drive method I described above would work as well.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #1913453 Reply

          Nathan Parker
          AskWoody_MVP

          One more, related question: How easily can one move files from the Mac to the Linux VM and back, ASCII files in particular?

          Sharing files like you found in the article works. The fastest way is generally if the VM and software is all configured correctly, you can simply drag and drop files between the VM and the Mac side, just like you can on any other Mac (it may copy instead of move the files, but it is still seamless).

          A USB drive is total overkill. File sharing or drag and drop is the quickest method.

          Nathan Parker

          • #1913459 Reply

            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Nathan: “A USB drive is total overkill. File sharing or drag and drop is the quickest method.

            I have been looking online at the instructions for setting up VMware and VirtualBox to be able to use file sharing, drag and drop, and cut and paste, and have found these instructions not only not quite as clear as mud but, perhaps, also a bit more confusing. (Maybe the Parallel’s ones are clearer? No idea, right now.) So, if the “cut and paste” etc. way can not be followed due to fog, at least until one gets to be more familiarized with the VM, could not the USB drive be a reasonably effective substitute? If it can be that, I would like to know. Not as elegant a way to achieve the same goal, of course, but as Einstein is said to have remarked on the importance of the appearance of physical laws: “the elegance you leave to your tailor.”

            So my question here is: can I use an USB drive to transfer files between the host OS (macOS) running on the real “bare metal” machine (a Mac) and the guest OS (Linux) running on the imaginary software VM?

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