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  • New : Parallels Desktop 15 for Mac

    Posted on Alex5723 Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Non-Windows operating systems macOS New : Parallels Desktop 15 for Mac

    This topic contains 32 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Alex5723 2 months, 1 week ago.

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    • #1907242 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      https://www.parallels.com/blogs/parallels-desktop-15-tech-guarantee-2019/

      In Parallels Desktop 15, this is a must-have upgrade packed with 30+ new features and powerful graphics performance:

      Work Faster – Start Microsoft Office applications up to 80% faster
      Next-level Graphics – Up to 15% faster, plus support for DirectX 11 via Apple Metal*
      Be Productive – Drag and drop screenshot previews and email files right from Finder
      Get Creative – Support for Apple Pencil in Sidecar, Xbox One controller via Bluetooth, IRISPen and more
      Future-Proof – Ready for upcoming macOS Catalina and Windows releases …

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1907256 Reply

      PKCano
      Da Boss

      I have always run the latest version of Parallels on my Macs. But like Woody’s DEFCON, I give it a while after first release for the bugs to be worked out before I upgrade.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1907388 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      In case someone reads this feeling curious about what “Parallels Desktop” actually does but has never heard of it, as was my own case, and as the Web page with the link provided by Alex5723 does not offer an explanation of its general purpose, I have done a little research and found out this: it is an application for creating virtual machines (VMs) where one can run software other than the one native to the machine, for example running Windows applications on a Mac in a virtual machine where Windows has been installed. It is probably quite versatile, considering what actually says in that Web page and that PKCano uses it.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1907654 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      In case someone reads this feeling curious about what “Parallels Desktop” actually does but has never heard of it, as was my own case, and as the Web page with the link provided by Alex5723 does not offer an explanation of its general purpose, I have done a little research and found out this: it is an application for creating virtual machines (VMs) where one can run software other than the one native to the machine, for example running Windows applications on a Mac in a virtual machine where Windows has been installed. It is probably quite versatile, considering what actually says in that Web page and that PKCano uses it.

      There are 3 options to install Windows on a Mac :

      1. Install Windows wiping MacOS (many do this as they like Apple’s MacBook hardware)
      2. Use the build-in Boot Camp app. You need to reboot your computer to switch between the systems.
      3. 3rd party app like Parallels Desktop, VirtualBox.. which let you run both MacOS and Windows at the same time.

      More here : https://macpaw.com/how-to/install-windows-on-mac

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1909079 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      When I ran Windows on a Mac, I used Parallels as well (VMWare Fusion’s performance wasn’t as good, and Oracle VirtualBox was a little glitchy. Boot Camp was way too glitchy, although performance was g00d).

      The new version of Parallels looks good, and I’d go back to Parallels if I ever need to run Windows directly on my Mac. In the meantime, my work is having me RDP into a Windows VM for work purposes.

      Linux can also be installed on it (although the Mac has a UNIX Command Line), and I’ve occasionally done so to run a few Linux weather tools before I could get the source code to compile directly on Mac.

      Nathan Parker

      • #1910841 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Nathan: “Linux can also be installed on it (although the Mac has a UNIX Command Line), and I’ve occasionally done so to run a few Linux weather tools before I could get the source code to compile directly on Mac.

        I would be interested in the opposite use of Linux on a Mac VM, if compiling a program’s source code in the Linux VM produced an actual Linux-compatible executable: one that can be run on an actual Linux machine. Is that even possible? If it were, I would love to have Linux running on my Mac in this way. I recently had to create a Linux executable, and still not having Linux installed on my Windows 7 PC at the time, I had to ask a friend to find me a NASA Linux computer where I could log in remotely from home. I prefer not to have to bother people in this way, if possible.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

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    • #1909336 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      What’s New in Parallels Desktop 15 for Mac

      Parallels 15 lands ready for macOS Catalina including Sidecar on iPad, DirectX 11 expands Windows game support using Apple Metal

      • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  Alex5723.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1910022 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      I have always run the latest version of Parallels on my Macs. But like Woody’s DEFCON, I give it a while after first release for the bugs to be worked out before I upgrade.

      It seems that some had the new version crash.

      https://9to5mac.com/2019/08/16/parallels-15-macos-catalina-support/

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1910931 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Nathan: “Linux can also be installed on it (although the Mac has a UNIX Command Line), and I’ve occasionally done so to run a few Linux weather tools before I could get the source code to compile directly on Mac.

      I would be interested in the opposite use of Linux on a Mac VM, if compiling a program’s source code in the Linux VM produced an actual Linux-compatible executable: one that can be run on an actual Linux machine. Is that even possible? If it were, I would love to have Linux running on my Mac in this way. I recently had to create a Linux executable, and still not having Linux installed on my Windows 7 PC at the time, I had to ask a friend to find me a NASA Linux computer where I could log in remotely from home. I prefer not to have to bother people in this way, if possible.

      If you run a Linux VM on your Mac through Parallels, VMWare Fusion, or Oracle VirtualBox (Parallels and VMWare Fusion costs, Parallels has the best performance although VMWare Fusion has better support for moving a VM to a Windows PC; VirtualBox is free if you simply don’t want to pay for VM software), then it’s the equivalent of having a physical Linux PC in your office, with the exception of the VM is set using the specs you assign to it and running on top of the Mac, so it could be slightly slower than a dedicated Linux PC. However, for everything I’ve ever done on Linux, Linux on a VM on a Mac was plenty of fast enough.

      Since a Mac has UNIX underpinnings, I’ve occasionally been able to re-compile the code directly on the Mac using Xcode’s Command Line Tools, MacPorts, and X11, so I could run the Linux apps I needed directly on the Mac. For the times I haven’t been able to though, Linux in a VM works.

      I’ve successfully done so with Ubuntu, Fedora, CentOS, and RHEL.

      Nathan Parker

      • #1911022 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks, Nathan, Let me rephrase my question: If I run Linux on a VM and compile the source code of a program in there, let’s say written in C++ or in Fortran, would I get the resulting executable in a binary compatible with Linux, so it can be run “as is” on a real Linux computer, or would I get a regular Mac binary that, being from a Mac, cannot be run on a Linux computer, as I know only too well?

        I would like to develop software on the Mac and then create, somehow, executables for Linux machines, so I can send that to colleagues in joint projects. At present, I can do that with my Windows 7 PC, because it has Linux installed in dual-boot with Windows. It would be nice to be able to do that also with the Mac, so I can shuttle work, as convenient, between the two machines without having to skip a beat. Otherwise, I’ll just make do by compiling all I need to make compatible with Linux on the PC while running Linux. So: not a major issue, but an interesting one for me all the same.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

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    • #1911079 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      If I run Linux on a VM and compile the source code of a program in there, let’s say written in C++ or in Fortran, would I get the resulting executable in a binary compatible with Linux, so it can be run “as is” on a real Linux computer, or would I get a regular Mac binary that, being from a Mac, cannot be run on a Linux computer, as I know only too well?

      Anything you compile inside the Linux VM itself would be a real Linux app that could be moved to a real Linux PC. It wouldn’t even execute on the Mac side unless you took the source code itself and re-compiled it directly on the Mac (and even then, I’ve only gotten it to work after installing Xcode command line tools, MacPorts, X11, and doing some hefty tweaking).

      So if you install a Linux VM on your Mac, everything inside the Linux VM, including development tools and compiled apps, are real Linux and totally different from your Mac. It’s the equivalent of setting a Linux PC on your desk, just you’re accessing it contained in a file versus its own hardware. It’s the same with installing Windows on a Mac. It’ll do exactly what you’re looking at doing.

      Nathan Parker

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    • #1911120 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Nathan: “Anything you compile inside the Linux VM itself would be a real Linux app that could be moved to a real Linux PC. It wouldn’t even execute on the Mac side unless you took the source code itself and re-compiled it directly on the Mac.

      Thank you so very much for this information! For me, it is a really good thing to know this is at all possible!

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1911139 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Thank you so very much for this information! For me, it is a really good thing to know this is at all possible!

      Glad to assist. Parallels would give you the most performance, but if you wanted to get your feet wet for free, you can try Oracle VirtualBox. I like the polish of Parallels better, but VirtualBox is functional for free. VMWare’s performance isn’t as good as Parallels, but the VM’s are easier to move to a Windows PC if need be.

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1911180 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        One more, related question: How easily can one move files from the Mac to the Linux VM and back, ASCII files in particular? One way I can imagine might work would be to plug an USB pen drive on the Mac and access its contents by opening the USB main directory from inside the Linux VM. And, in the same way, pass ASCII files and others, such as PDFs, GIFs, JPEGs, etc. (that can be used equally well under either OS) from the Linux VM to the Mac. Would that really work as described? Even if it does work, is there an even simpler way?

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

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        • #1911194 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          I looked for answers to my question on the Web and found these two topics with relevant information others might be interested to know about as well:

          For VMWare:

          https://pubs.vmware.com/fusion-5/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.vmware.fusion.help.doc%2FGUID-3C0EA5DA-98DD-4835-9C84-354472B25303.html

          For VirtualBox:

          Permanently share a folder between host (Mac) and guest (Linux) OS using VirtualBox

          But, all the same, I also would like to know if the USB drive method I described above would work as well.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #1913453 Reply

          Nathan Parker
          AskWoody_MVP

          One more, related question: How easily can one move files from the Mac to the Linux VM and back, ASCII files in particular?

          Sharing files like you found in the article works. The fastest way is generally if the VM and software is all configured correctly, you can simply drag and drop files between the VM and the Mac side, just like you can on any other Mac (it may copy instead of move the files, but it is still seamless).

          A USB drive is total overkill. File sharing or drag and drop is the quickest method.

          Nathan Parker

          • #1913459 Reply

            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            Nathan: “A USB drive is total overkill. File sharing or drag and drop is the quickest method.

            I have been looking online at the instructions for setting up VMware and VirtualBox to be able to use file sharing, drag and drop, and cut and paste, and have found these instructions not only not quite as clear as mud but, perhaps, also a bit more confusing. (Maybe the Parallel’s ones are clearer? No idea, right now.) So, if the “cut and paste” etc. way can not be followed due to fog, at least until one gets to be more familiarized with the VM, could not the USB drive be a reasonably effective substitute? If it can be that, I would like to know. Not as elegant a way to achieve the same goal, of course, but as Einstein is said to have remarked on the importance of the appearance of physical laws: “the elegance you leave to your tailor.”

            So my question here is: can I use an USB drive to transfer files between the host OS (macOS) running on the real “bare metal” machine (a Mac) and the guest OS (Linux) running on the imaginary software VM?

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

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    • #1917236 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      So my question here is: can I use an USB drive to transfer files between the host OS (macOS) running on the real “bare metal” machine (a Mac) and the guest OS (Linux) running on the imaginary software VM?

      It should definitely work, yes, but provided that you installed Linux on the VM, plus installed the “virtual machine tools” (Parallels Tools, VMWare Tools, or whatever the “tools” on VirtualBox is called), then drag and drop should work. If it’s not, then something isn’t configured the way it needs to be.

      Nathan Parker

      • #1917240 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        You can drag and drop
        You can also copy and paste because the clipboard works across the two platforms.
        And with Parallels, the other OS is just a three-finger swipe away.

        I used to struggle networking all my Windows computers back before I started using Macs. Now I just AirDrop between the Macs and copy/paste between the Mac hosts and the Windows VMs.

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      • #1917277 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Nathan: “provided that you installed Linux on the VM, plus installed the “virtual machine tools

        That is just it: installing those “VM tools” is what I find unsatisfactorily explained in the manuals and documents provided by the developers of those two VM applications that are available on line.

        If I am going to be motivated enough to install either, or something else, such as Parallels, I would like first to have a reasonably clear idea of what is involved in getting them to work before choosing, downloading and installing one of them, not after I make that move. So any port in a storm, and a USB memory stick just in case.

        Thanks for confirming that a USB drive will also work, if everything else fails. Better than uninstalling the application to get rid if it, or keeping it, but never trying to use it again.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

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        • #1917894 Reply

          PKCano
          Da Boss

          Not to be answering for Nathan, but providing some information.

          A driver is a program that allows the software OS to “talk” to the computer’s hardware. Each OS has its own set of drivers that interpret the OS’s software instructions in order to be able to provide functionality for each of the hardware components.

          The drivers for MacOS don’t work directly in Windows or Linux. And drivers for Windows and Linux don’t work directly in MacOS.

          In the case of Parallels, where you have MacOS as host and you install Windows in a VM, the Windows guest has to use the Macs hardware (b/c it has no hardware of its own). When you install Windows in the VM, Windows senses the Mac’s hardware and installs Windows drivers for the hardware. But Windows drivers can’t directly control the Mac’s hardware. MacOS has to control the hardware.

          So Parallels installs Parallels Tools, part of which are the “pseudo” drivers that translate Windows instructions to the hardware into commands that MacOS can understand and the MacOS then provides the expected functionality. The Tools allow Windows to operate as if it were installed directly on the hardware itself.

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          • #1918218 Reply

            OscarCP
            AskWoody Plus

            I imagine the same should be true of any other VM around, including VMware and Virtual Box. So I am beginning to suspect that a USB memory stick won’t work unless the VM tools are installed first. In which case, I would guess, for me it is likely to be “bye, bye VM with Linux on my Mac” idea. Unless the VM tools are installed along with the VM in the same operation, so the user does not have to do it by hand afterwards, which is not the case with those two I’ve already looked into.

            According to PK Cano: “So Parallels installs Parallels Tools” So, with Parallels, when you install it, its VM tools get installed along with it by the same installer, in a single operation and not by the user afterwards? If that is so, and then the VM is completely ready for use, including accessing a USB driver and any other important peripherals plugged into the host, as well as being able to use copy and paste, etc. right away, then, for me, Parallels is the thing to go for. If so: is Parallels something that one buys and can keep for ever, or something that can only be rented on an annual or some other basis?

            Hmmm… I just found these instructions for installing Linux Mint in a Parallels VM on a Mac, including the tools as an additional step during the actual Linux VM install, but a seemingly easy one that also seems to be well explained, for once: https:

            //kb.parallels.com/124109

            It is from 2017, of Sierra vintage, but I am guessing it remains current today.

            The one thing unclear to me here is this: when one gets to the screen for installing the Tools (shown there in a screenshot), what does one click on, exactly, to get that started?

            Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

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            • #1918227 Reply

              OscarCP
              AskWoody Plus

              I just found out that “Parallels” rents on an annual basis. At $100 a year, that is not a problem for me. But now I have a second question (besides “where to click?”): it says  in the Parallels Web page that their latest version, Parallels 15, now on sale and also available for a 15-day free install to check it out, is “ready for Catalina”, the next version, coming out next month, of macOS. Has anybody used this version 15 with Mojave and found any incompatibilities or other problems that might have something to do with having Mojave on the Mac? I am in no hurry to update Mojave to Catalina, because I can still keep using it for another two years, and will also wait for six months, preferably until the first major update of a new version of macOS is released, before installing it, to give the developers at Apple time to iron out the worst wrinkles.

              Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

            • #1918254 Reply

              PKCano
              Da Boss

              My suggestion is for you to find one of your associates who has a VM installed and get them to show it to you. It doesn’t matter which OS is the host and which OS is the guest. All of them basically work the same way. My impression is you have never seen a Virtual Machine and do not have a clear understanding of what it is or how it works, in spite of what you read.

              A VM is a complete installation of the guest OS, just as if it were installed in its own computer. EXCEPT – it has no actual  hardware. The Virtual machine software (Parallels, VMWare, etc) provide a container (big file – think bubble) for the guest OS to operate in. It operates the same as it would anywhere EXCEPT – it has no actual hardware. The Tools are simply a program that provides the the interpreter between the guest OS and the host OS (among other things) so the guest can use the host’s hardware. The VM doesn’t work right without this – not Patallels, not VMWare, not others.

              Screen-Shot-2019-08-24-at-2.02.56-PM

              During an install of the guest OS on a Mac, Parallels provides the container (bubble) in which to install the guest OS. With a Windows install, it goes through the normal install steps and reboots to the login screen when finished. Immediately after you reach the desktop after login, Parallels automatically installs the Tools, essentially swapping out the Windows installed drivers where necessary and replacing them with Parallels drivers so the Windows installation can use the external hardware. This requires another reboot so the guest can start using the Parallels drivers.

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            • #1918291 Reply

              PKCano
              Da Boss

              I don’t “rent” Parallels. I bought Parallels a few years back for the full purchase price (whatever it was then). I am currently using Parallels 14. Parallels 15 just came out but I don’t install the first issue of any software, so I’m waiting. I can get the upgrade to 15 for $49.99 when I get ready. Last year, they even gave me a $10/seat gift card – And I have Parallels on 5 Macs.

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            • #1918306 Reply

              OscarCP
              AskWoody Plus

              Thanks. I’ve found no option to buy outright in the “Parallels” Web page dedicated to version 15.

              I already knew what a VM does, what is a hypervisor, etc. The explanation by PKCano is, nevertheless, probably going to be useful to others visiting this page. The one thing I did not expect, not having actually installed and used a VM before, was that the VM tools had to be installed separately, as they seem to me to be an essential part of the whole thing, for its fullest utilization by its users. I imagined that, at most, it would be necessary to answer the installer Wizard’s question: “Do you want to install this? Yes/No.” And the explanations available online of how to install them, until today and except  only in the case of Parallels, have not been clear at all to me.

              The best thing to do now, in line with PK’s advice to wait for this new version to settle down, is to wait for a while and then install the free-trial, for-a-limited-time-only version of Parallels 15 and see how that works out, before going any further.

              Also: I still would like to know where to click, as it is not at all clear from the picture illustrating this in that Parallels’ Web page (see my question in my first posting, in this thread, of today.)

              Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

            • #1918365 Reply

              OscarCP
              AskWoody Plus

              Clarifying the above: I knew what a VM does, etc., but not what additional steps were needed to connect it to the peripherals of the host. I was hoping that for some of those peripherals, such as a USB memory stick, the install might need no additional steps, as I was installing, (in my case) in a Mac version of Parallels, a Linux Mint VM, so maybe some of that was worked out automatically during the installation of the latter, over the Internet.

              With my thanks to PKCano for explaining how this is actually done.

              Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

            • #1918415 Reply

              PKCano
              Da Boss

              There IS an option to buy on the Parallels website – $79.99 . $49.99 to upgrade version. This is for the boxed version, but I always just download mine b/c it’s quicker.
              Screen-Shot-2019-08-24-at-4.26.14-PM

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    • #1918613 Reply

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      There is a way to buy Parallels outright, although since Parallels offers a new version each year, the subscription is a good option since macOS upgrades have a tendency to cause issues with Parallels (and VMWare) where keeping Parallels upgraded with the latest version is a good idea for heavy Parallels users.

      If you don’t want to invest any money into testing the waters with VM apps, VirtualBox is decent (or a Parallels trial).

      Usually to install those “tools” such as Parallels Tools, it’s a matter of clicking “Install Parallels Tools” from the Mac side, which mounts a virtual CD on the Linux side, then you simply run a script. Parallels tools is even somewhat graphical (I think it launches Terminal but outputs it a little more graphically). If you needed assistance walking through it, someone here can definitely help. In the past it was a little difficult for me since I wasn’t Linux savvy, but now they’ve all made the process so much easier, plus if you’re Linux savvy at all, you can do it.

      Nathan Parker

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    • #1918662 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Nathan,

      Thanks for explaining that. Now, in the installations step shown here:

      //kb.parallels.com/124109

      Screen-Shot-2019-08-24-at-10.24.21-PM

      would you say that the big black triangle is the place to push to get things moving?

      And in this second screenshot showing the last step of the installation of Parallels’ VM tools, would you say that the “root password” is the one created in a previous step, when installing Linux Mint (in this case) for use in Mint? It looks that, if such is the case, the “user name” is not chosen by the user, because it defaults to “Parallels”.

      Screen-Shot-2019-08-24-at-9.59.10-PM

      Thanks and sorry for all the posting about this one thing.

       

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

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      • #1918846 Reply

        Nathan Parker
        AskWoody_MVP

        Looks like you’re doing it correctly. I think that is the prompt to install Parallels Tools.

        The root password is the password you created when setting up Linux (on the root password creation screen). If you want a different user account name, you can create it on the Linux side (I had a Linux VM once with a few different user accounts since I had different programs that would have overlapped in the user accounts, had to do with weather stuff).

        Seems they’ve moved to a full graphical Parallels Tools installer (just like installing Windows on a Mac in a VM). Very nice and far easier to work with. In the past, I had to either use Terminal to run the command, or work in a semi-graphical interface in terminal. This is far simpler and easier than anything I dealt with.

        Seems you’re getting there and will be there before you know it.

        Nathan Parker

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    • #1918862 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks, Nathan and PK for your help.

      When I have some time (busy right now developing in the Mac software to clean up and process some GPS data sets needed for a NASA project and hoping to be able to do that kind of thing using Linux on a Parallels VM!), then I’ll install the free trial version of Parallels 15, its VM tools and a Linux VM and see how that works out. Once I’m done, I’ll be back here with the news.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W(?) + Mac&Lx

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    • #1946281 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      9to5mac : Parallels 15 review

      When Parallels 15 was released a few weeks ago, I realized that there are two types of people when it comes to virtualization software: those that care deeply and those that cannot fathom why people still run Windows/Linux on top of macOS. The more people I talk to about this, the more I realize that the market might have been broader for running Windows on macOS back during the initial Intel transition, but that today, the market is more in-depth. The people who use this software rely on it for essential tasks related to their jobs and or hobbies. The good thing for them is that Parallels 15 continues to go deeper with Windows integration on macOS. What’s the verdict on Parallels 15? After using it for a few weeks, let’s dive into my Parallels 15 review.

      Parallels 15 review: Key refinements for DirectX 11 and Catalina lead the way for Windows virtualization on macOS

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