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  • No fix for the Feb cumulative update “lost profile” bug in sight. I suggest you Win10 1903 and 1909 customers make sure Pause Updates is engaged.

    Home Forums AskWoody blog No fix for the Feb cumulative update “lost profile” bug in sight. I suggest you Win10 1903 and 1909 customers make sure Pause Updates is engaged.

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      • #2169310 Reply
        woody
        Da Boss

        Microsoft hasn’t yet publicly acknowledged the bug that we’ve known about for nine days: Installing the February cumulative update for Win10 version 1
        [See the full post at: No fix for the Feb cumulative update “lost profile” bug in sight. I suggest you Win10 1903 and 1909 customers make sure Pause Updates is engaged.]

        6 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2169322 Reply
        Mr. Natural
        AskWoody Plus

        That particular patch has been declined in our WSUS system. I don’t do that very often but once in a while I will and this is one of those times. I don’t need any of that drama going on at work. If there’s a whiff of lost data in a patch it gets high scrutiny and usually will be declined regardless.

        Red Ruffnsore reporting from the front lines.

      • #2169333 Reply
        sheldon
        AskWoody Plus

        Win10 1903 pro  -KB 4532693 hid via wushowhide and quality updates delayed for 30 days.

      • #2169354 Reply
        b
        AskWoody Plus

        Microsoft has long warned that you can only extend updates after you’ve installed the currently available updates:

        After the pause limit is reached, you’ll need to install the latest updates before you can pause updates again.

        I’m delighted — and surprised — to tell you that, at least in my tests, that limitation no longer applies.

        You haven’t reached the pause limit.

        Windows 10 Pro Version 2004: Group ASAP (chump/pioneer)

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2169453 Reply
          woody
          Da Boss

          After further experimentation, I’ve found that you’re right and I’m wrong.

          PKCano warned me about it a few hours ago. Looks like you can bump up to 35 days at any point prior to the clock running out — but once you’ve hit 35 days, you can’t go any longer.

      • #2169365 Reply
        Zaphyrus
        AskWoody Lounger

        I am happy I decided to hide the update  when it arrived in my computer,

        Just someone who don't want Windows to mess with its computer.
      • #2169372 Reply
        EP
        AskWoody_MVP

        let’s see what happens next Tue. Feb. 25 if MS will issue any optional updates for 1903/1909 then or if they’ll actually address the problem next Tue.

      • #2169416 Reply
        Seff
        AskWoody Plus

        Would it be sensible then for those of us Windows 7 users who are on the verge of running an upgrade to Windows 10 version 1909 to hold fire for a few more days at least?

        Personally I’m happy to accept that I’m going to upgrade to Windows 10, but don’t see the point in trying to upgrade initially to anything except the current version (including the latest patches which the upgrade is likely to install I imagine), and I don’t see the need for an immediate rush to upgrade because even if there were still February updates for Windows 7 we wouldn’t be installing them yet as it’s still DefCon 2. Last year, for example, I didn’t install the February updates until 8th March.

        It seems to me to be a case of finding the right balance risk-wise between waving goodbye to Windows 7 and greeting Windows 10. It looks like we may not be quite there yet. Or are we?

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Seff.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2169421 Reply
          Alex5723
          AskWoody Plus

          Would it be sensible then for those of us Windows 7 users who are on the verge of running an upgrade to Windows 10 version 1909 to hold fire for a few more days at least?

          I think not. The wait doesn’t matter as each monthly Windows 10 update for the last 5 years had its own catastrophe and more to come.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2169454 Reply
          woody
          Da Boss

          Yep. Based on Susan’s interaction with an official support ticket (see the next post on the main blog), I’d say you’d be well advised to hold off moving from Win7 until we get this inanity ironed out.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2169422 Reply
        Win7and10
        AskWoody Lounger

        This update already was installed last week as I did not know I could pause 7 more days.

        The proof is in the pudding so to speak, so far no issues.

        To tell the truth I am not excited about the maintenance required for Win 10 1909 Home.

        In speaking with some of my friends, they don’t even check for updates or just allow the computer to update itself. Now that is scary!

        Knowing that I can keep pausing for 7 more days is something that is valuable to me and also knowing that I can hide as along as I am in the pause period.

        Win 7 Home Premium x 64 SP1 (DELL INSPIRION i5) Still Alive!
        Win 10 Home 1909 (HP ENVY i7)

        • #2169449 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          You can pause for a MAXIMUM of 35 days.

          • #2169495 Reply
            DriftyDonN
            AskWoody Plus

            pkcano=> on HOME edition, my 35 days are up ….feb29 except on the advanced page Mar1

            go figure…doesnt matter anyway….too late to change it now.

            Pro version 35th day 16 mar  whew!

             

            image made    wait      laugh or cry or scream

             

            • #2169969 Reply
              anonymous
              Guest

              Hi,

              I am using Windows 10 v1903 x64 Home Edition on my laptop and updated patches until Jan 2020 via Windows Update back in Jan 2020. Checked on Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update today and pause update was set until 26 Feb 2020. Hit Advanced Options and maximum pause update can be extended to 27 Feb 2020 i.e. only by 1 day.

              Tinkered by hitting resume updates and Windows Update started it’s checking run. Once the list of available updates are shown and then they are set to “Pending Download” Status. Interrupted the Windows Update process by hitting “Airplane Mode” i.e. cutting the internet connection.

              Checked on Advanced Options again and the maximum pause update is now until 29 Mar 2020. Extended the pause update accordingly. Checked on View Update History indicated those listed patches installation as failed.

              Note : My Internet connection setting is on “Metered Connection”.

              Can anyone replicate this method on Home edition to further extend the pause update from the original maximum allowed?

              2 users thanked author for this post.
              • #2170021 Reply
                PKCano
                Da Boss

                What happens when you turn off the Airplane mode? Does the installation try to resume?

                Does anything show in the Windows Update queue as pending? How about in wushowhide?

              • #2170047 Reply
                anonymous
                Guest

                Hi again,

                PKCano

                Q1) What happens when you turn off the Airplane mode? Does the installation try to resume?

                No, the installation did not resume. Before turning off the Airplane Mode, I have already extended the pause updates to 29 Mar 2020.

                Q2) Does anything show in the Windows Update queue as pending? How about in wushowhide?

                The Windows Update only shows “Updates paused – Your device won’t be up to date while updates are paused.Updates will resume on 29/03/2020” with the Resume Updates button below it and no update queue shown. Running wushowhide troubleshooter at this point i.e. after updates paused status and hitting Hide Updates do not show any pending updates.

                Additional info (May not be relevant) – I have hidden several drivers updates offered via Windows Update back in Jan 2020 via wushowhide . The first posting I made earlier was a couple of hours ago and I have restarted windows while posting this reply. A check at Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update > Advanced Options now shows  the maximum pause update date available is now until 30 Mar 2020 i.e extended by another day.

                4 users thanked author for this post.
              • #2170055 Reply
                Grond
                AskWoody Plus

                I’m going to play Captain Obvious here, but this is, I think, new and possibly important/relevant information here for those of us that use the Pause Updates function: perhaps a way to “reset” or extend the Pause period.

                I’m on Win10 Pro v1903 build 18362.592 updated January 25, my Pause period is maxed and is set to resume on February 29; this has made me strongly consider ignoring this month’s Defcon rating and installing the 2020-02 (February) patches.

                I’m definitely not a seeker but I do like staying reasonably current on Windows patches and don’t like skipping months. I have a system image and rescue media at the ready. Well, they’re hidden in a drawer in an anti-static bag, not near my PC.

                Windows 10 Pro x64 v1909 Desktop PC

              • #2170056 Reply
                PKCano
                Da Boss

                Needs verification, but yes.

                There may be caveats – it causes problems for WU in the future, you get upgraded (not updated) next time around, etc. I’d be careful trying something like this, especially if you are using a production machine.

              • #2170302 Reply
                DriftyDonN
                AskWoody Plus

                Hey dont look a gift horse….etc! My date for pause to end was 29Feb!!! This is a godsend(note small g).

                Works like a charm. Just to bad mcsft will now know about this and mess it up. I can sleep tonight!

                1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #2170508 Reply
                Cybertooth
                AskWoody Plus

                I, too, have been wondering how long before MS “fixes” this.

                 

      • #2169425 Reply
        Zaphyrus
        AskWoody Lounger

        you know, its incredible, that event after 5 years of being in the market,  Microsoft haven’t managed to issue an update that doesn’t cause an issue.

        Just someone who don't want Windows to mess with its computer.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2169455 Reply
          woody
          Da Boss

          We’ve had a few relatively clean cumulative updates. But not nearly enough.

      • #2169428 Reply
        Win7and10
        AskWoody Lounger

        Question: Isn’t it better to let the computer check for updates, find the updates in Windows 10 like it does in Windows 7, then select, hide the updates and pause the updates? If you pause, they are just sitting there waiting to install.

        Feedback welcomed as this is hurting my head…LOL!

         

        Win 7 Home Premium x 64 SP1 (DELL INSPIRION i5) Still Alive!
        Win 10 Home 1909 (HP ENVY i7)

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Win7and10.
      • #2169433 Reply
        RVAUser
        AskWoody Plus

        Someone on another thread mentioned the “Advanced Options” that allows you to set a date in the future, so that you don’t have to remember too come back every seven days and hit the pause button again (which is what I’ve always done – just a single user, 1909).  Any reason why this wouldn’t be a better solution?

        • #2169437 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          You don’t have to come back every seven days. You can click the “Pause” button more than once.
          Example 3 clicks = 21 day pause. If down the road, that is not enough, you have two more clicks at any time to reach the MAXIMUM of 35 days.
          But if you let the pause period end, you get the pending updates.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2169522 Reply
            KYKaren
            AskWoody Plus

            To @PKCano:

            We all need a definitive document (e.g., an AKB article) that puts everyone on the same page (so to speak) about PAUSE — for Home Users, for Pro users, w/o any Deferrals,  with Deferrals, w/o Group Editor #2-Notify download/install, with Group Editor.

            I know you don’t suggest, for Pro users, to use PAUSE at all, but what about users who do? Few of us, understand it, using it or not.

            Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
            Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
            Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

            • #2169524 Reply
              PKCano
              Da Boss
            • #2169527 Reply
              b
              AskWoody Plus

              I know you don’t suggest, for Pro users, to use PAUSE at all,

              Woody has done, for the last six months:

              In version 1903 (either Home or Pro), using an administrator account, click Start > Settings > Update & Security. At the top, click the “Pause updates for 7 days” button. That button changes so it says, “Pause updates for 7 more days.” Click it two more times, for a total of 21 paused days.
              Computerworld | SEP 9, 2019

              Windows 10 Pro Version 2004: Group ASAP (chump/pioneer)

              • #2169543 Reply
                KYKaren
                AskWoody Plus

                Yes, that was the implication — different suggestions by different “da bosses” about forestalling the monthly Patch Tuesday updates.   And, as evidenced here, despite these suggestions (in various locations and in different forms, maybe because of this), there is still confusion about the nature of PAUSE and how it works.  That’s why I say, we need something definitive, all in one place, such as an AKB.

                Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
                Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
                Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

      • #2169442 Reply
        280park
        AskWoody Plus

        Windows 10 Pro Version 1903 Build 18362.592

        On January 29 I clicked the “Pause updates for 7 days” button five times. “Updates will resume on 3/4/2020” is now displayed and “Pause updates for 7 days” is grayed out.

        I am too new to Windows 10 to experiment with anything while these buggy patches are floating around.

        • #2169450 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          5 clicks X 7 days/click = the maximum of 35 days. That’s all you have.

          But you don’t have to click 5 times a once. If you cliick 3 times (=21 days) and you find out you need more time, you still have 2 clicks left to reach 35 days.
          But if you let the pause period end before you click again…….Whamo, you’ve got the patches.

          3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2169458 Reply
            woody
            Da Boss

            That’s quite correct.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2169490 Reply
              280park
              AskWoody Plus

              @PKCano and @woody

              In post #2196326 Woody says “I never set Pause to 35 days – because it’ll then expire after the next cumulative update comes out.”

              Does that mean that over an extended period of time the operator can click on the “Pause updates for 7 days” button more than five times provided that the last click does not extend the expiration date of the pause period to a date equal to or more than 35 days from the last click date?

              For example, suppose on day one the operator clicks the “Pause updates for 7 days” button four times thereby establishing a pause period of twenty-eight days. Then, after waiting eight days the operator clicks the pause button twice extending the pause period to thirty-four days from that date. Then after another seven days has elapsed, the operator clicks the pause button once to extend the pause expiration date to thirty-four days from that date. And so forth.

              • #2169503 Reply
                PKCano
                Da Boss

                No, the maximum is 35 days (5 clicks) then you have to install pending updates before you can pause again.

                3 users thanked author for this post.
              • #2169558 Reply
                bonbon
                AskWoody Plus

                Since I have Windows 10 Pro series, and  my quality and feature updates have the number zero (0) in the boxes, is it possible to extend the time that the updates actually download/install by adding a # of days where the zero’s are or is that just wasting my time and accept the inevitable of the installation of updates after the 35 days are up?

              • #2169564 Reply
                PKCano
                Da Boss

                The maximum deferral is 30 days beginning when the update is released. If you have Pause already set for 35 days, I don’t know which will take precedence since you set Pause first..

                One thing you can try to do is set Group Policy to “notify (download/install)”. Look at KB2000016 in the section for Win Pro, and at the bottom, the settings that I use. There are instructions to set the value in GP = “2” and links to pictures of how to do it. This may work in this case (or not), but it will definitely help in the future.

          • #2169566 Reply
            KWGuy
            AskWoody Plus

            Thanks for the very clear explanation…a big help!

            After the 35 days are up, will the metered connection trick then provide a secondary safeguard to prevent the updates from being installed.  I’ve use metered connection successfully in the patch and am now using the pause feature.

            • #2169571 Reply
              PKCano
              Da Boss

              I think the Metered connection will keep the BIG patches (like the CU) from downloading, but if there are smaller ones, it may not stop them. You can try to hide them with wushowhide when they show up after Pause. But in the long run, you won’t be able to use Pause again until you install the pending updates.

              2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2169457 Reply
        bonbon
        AskWoody Plus

        I have Windows 10 – 1909 series.  I placed my updates on the maximum hold of 35 days back in mid-January.  My 35 days is up on March 1st.  Is there anything else I can do to avoid the buggy February updates?  (My quality and feature updates have the number zero (0) in the boxes.)

        Any suggestions?

         

         

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2169468 Reply
        DriftyDonN
        AskWoody Plus

        5 clicks X 7 days/click = the maximum of 35 days. That’s all you have.

        But you don’t have to click 5 times a once. If you cliick 3 times (=21 days) and you find out you need more time, you still have 2 clicks left to reach 35 days.
        But if you let the pause period end before you click again…….Whamo, you’ve got the patches.

        now you tell US!! 😉

        • #2169472 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          I’ve never said you had more than 35 days.
          You’ve always had 5 clicks = 35 days.
          Didn’t you read AKB2000016?

          + Pause – You can pause updates up to 35 days in 7-day increments. Remember when you do, they will not show up in Windows Update or  wushowhide, so you will not be able to see what is pending. At the end of the Pause period the updates will download and install (unless you have set metered connections). You can increase the “Pause” period at any time by clicking “Pause” again, up to the maximum of 35 days. You can end the “Pause” whenever you want to do so.

           

          3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2169467 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Pardon me if these are dumb questions, I’m new to the whole Win 10 thing.  My desktop is still on Win 7 Professional and I’m planning to buy a new Win 10 desktop soon (trying to find one I can configure with Win 10 Pro).  So I guess it’s important to understand not only what Win 10 I’m getting (Home vs. Pro), but also the exact build it will come loaded with?  I think I’ll take advice and wait until the latest patch woes are fixed.  But – all the talk about delayed update installs in Win 10??  In Win 7 you can permanently choose to get notification and download, but not for you system to ever install without your intervention.  Why can’t that be done in Win 10, and why aren’t Win 10 users pressing for it?

        • #2169474 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          Answering these questions here would be off-topic in this thread about missing profiles and using Pause. There is a lot of information about Win10 on this site. Please spend some time reading, then start a Topic in the Win10 Forum to have your specific questions answered.

        • #2169631 Reply
          Susan Bradley
          AskWoody MVP

          Microsoft has to balance what we think we want with what is best for us.  We had folks in Win7 era that NEVER installed updates.  If you let someone defer updates indefinitely we’re back to having a bunch of insecure computers.  The current 1909 does prompt a lot more than the prior versions and give you warning.

          But honestly to have it back to the 7 way?  I don’t want it that way.  We need updates.  We really do.

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady

          • #2169645 Reply
            Cybertooth
            AskWoody Plus

            As this and so many other threads at Woody’s attest month after month after month, installing updates is emphatically not an unalloyed benefit. Only each one of us is qualified to decide, given our own circumstances, the comparative risks and benefits of installing any or all of any month’s updates (and how long to wait).

            Microsoft or others in the cybersecurity field could perform an invaluable service by seeking to publish reliable statistics on the actual number of computers affected by each exploit that has made it into the wild, compared to the total applicable computer population. Better yet would be formal studies to determine the actual probability of a PC’s getting infected from a given flaw if the flaw remains unpatched. We know that at least some exploits are used for highly targeted and elaborate attacks against high-profile individuals or organizations: how many of us are heads of state or industrial titans that state-sponsored hackers want to spy on or steal from?

            So long as such reliable statistics remain unavailable to the public, you and I and every other PC user on the planet are acting on little more than speculation. Some of us unquestionably (or, perhaps, unquestioningly) succumb to the counsel of fear, others to the imprudence born of overconfidence; and some of us may find a reasonable balance between those two extremes. But that balance is only for each of us to find in our own case, and not for some Redmond nanny to decree for all.

             

            • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Cybertooth.
            • #2169717 Reply
              joep517
              AskWoody MVP

              Publishing statistics on the efficacy of an exploit would only serve to tell the bad guys where to expend their effort. Unfortunately, not publishing statistics lets FUD run rampant. It has long been my opinion that many of the reports of problems are way overblown. If you scour this site and others for any one problem and multiply the count by 100 or 1000 or 100000 you still come up with a very small percentage of Windows users. The absolute number may be large for normal people and even scary to some but in the larger Windows universe, it is small to insignificant. You also see reports of this February update being successfully installed by Susan, bbearren, me, my wife (a decidedly non-techie) and others.

              While running tests to determine which systems seems like a good idea, for the test to be effective Microsoft would have to have such a large group of system configurations it would be prohibitive in time and money.

              --Joe

              2 users thanked author for this post.
              • #2169769 Reply
                bbearren
                AskWoody MVP

                You also see reports of this February update being successfully installed by Susan, bbearren, me, my wife (a decidedly non-techie) and others.

                “No fix for the Feb cumulative update “lost profile” bug in sight.”  Where, exactly, is the bug?  From a reply of mine in an earlier thread,

                For the shop owners/employees posting anecdotes about Windows 10 users bringing in their PC’s for bad update results, in view of nearly one billion Windows 10 installations, unless all the shops are having to turn away hundreds of potential customers because they are already overloaded with customers with the same issues, those anecdotal numbers aren’t significant.

                Is the “bug” in the Microsoft update, or could it be the configuration of the Windows 10 installations that are affected by the update?  One percent of the Windows 10 installed base is approximately 10,000,000 installations.  Is anyone seeing anywhere near that number of complaints from any source?  “Millions of Windows 10 users” would likely make it into mainstream media, don’t you think?

                Taking into account the permutations and combinations of hardware and software for an installed base of ~one billion, the concept of testing updates against such a number is simply nonsense.

                If “hundreds” are having issues but hundreds of millions are not (cumulative updates are pushed by Microsoft), where is the “bug”?

                It’s not a bug for several of us right here at AskWoody; it’s just another update.

                Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
                "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
                "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

            • #2169758 Reply
              wavy
              AskWoody Plus

              Microsoft or others in the cybersecurity field could perform an invaluable service by seeking to publish reliable statistics on the actual number of computers affected by each exploit that has made it into the wild, compared to the total applicable computer population. Better yet would be formal studies to determine the actual probability of a PC’s getting infected from a given flaw if the flaw remains unpatched

              And that is called ‘wishful thinking’ 😄

              🍻

              Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
              2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2169475 Reply
        bbearren
        AskWoody MVP

        Version 1909 (OS Build 18363.657)  KB4532693 Successfully installed on ‎2/‎11/‎2020, no issues.

        I can’t help but wonder, of those having issues with KB4532693, how many were fully updated with every available update Microsoft had offered their systems and were “healthy” (dism /online /cleanup-image /restorehealth followed by a successful sfc /scannow periodically)?

        How many had a recent (a week old or less) known-good drive image to restore in the event of issues?  I wonder, because on August 3, 2009 I had an issue with KB915597, resolved the issue via email exchanges (I still have the emails) with Tanya Wang, Microsoft Windows Update Support Professional, and I’ve not had an issue with a Windows Update since.

        I have driver updates blocked, and that’s it, nothing delayed.  The “buggy updates” are not “buggy” for every PC, just some PC’s.  Instead of “DON’T LET THIS UPDATE DOWNLOAD!!!”, why not “Create a drive image, air-gap it, then try the update to see if it has any effect on your PC, and let us know the results, including your PC specs.”?

        That’s what I do, but I have yet to have anything to report.

        Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
        "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
        "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2169477 Reply
          Alex5723
          AskWoody Plus

          How many had a recent (a week old or less) known-good drive image to restore in the event of issues?

          How many Windows 10 home users know what a image is and of those how many know which apps to use and how to create an image and a rescue USB ? I would say the majority don’t know.
          The majority of users (hundred of millions) don’t have a Microsoft account so can’t flood Microsoft help with bugs they have.

          • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Alex5723.
          • #2169506 Reply
            b
            AskWoody Plus

            The majority of users (hundred of millions) don’t have a Microsoft account so can’t flood Microsoft help with bugs they have.

            How could you know that?

            Windows 10 Pro Version 2004: Group ASAP (chump/pioneer)

            • #2169680 Reply
              Alex5723
              AskWoody Plus

              The majority of users (hundred of millions) don’t have a Microsoft account so can’t flood Microsoft help with bugs they have.

              How could you know that?

              I worked for 40 years in IT. No one that I know had a Microsoft account. All were using local account which I think is the reason Microsoft is forcing new installs to have a Microsoft account :

              https://winfuture.de/news,111558.html

              • #2169718 Reply
                joep517
                AskWoody MVP

                A Microsoft account is a relatively new thing compared to your time in IT. It is even new in the Windows time frame. If you were working in IT at a company of any size you were probably in an AD environment where a local account was all that was needed as a backup to get into the system in case you ran into AD problems.

                --Joe

          • #2169580 Reply
            bbearren
            AskWoody MVP

            How many Windows 10 home users know what a image is and of those how many know which apps to use and how to create an image and a rescue USB ?

            You do realize that you’re making my point, don’t you?

            Everyone MUST have backups.

            I completely agree.  Why is this so hard for folks to wrap their heads around?  I haven’t had any problems with updates/upgrades, but obviously some have.  And yet I stay fully prepared with drive images.

            And hardware failure is a matter of when, not if.  I have replaced motherboards and hard drives on my machines, always with drive images at the ready to make a smooth transition after replacement.  It is not that hard to do, and pays huge dividends in both time and money.

            Why people would rather complain bitterly about Microsoft instead of preparing for an easy resolution to problems is something I simply don’t understand.

            Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
            "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
            "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2169431 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Somebody needs to say it. Why are they moving the user’s data around during updates? Other operating systems do not do this.

        And, why are they displaying screens that tell the user the opposite? “All your files are right where you left them.” Except when we goof, and neglect to put them back!”

        • #2169508 Reply
          Susan Bradley
          AskWoody MVP

          They aren’t moving data around.  What’s happening is that you aren’t logging into your “actual” profile during this rebooting process.

          The only time they move data around is during the feature update process.

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2169744 Reply
            rontpxz81
            AskWoody Lounger

            Susan Bradley,

            you state”you aren’t logging into your “actual” profile during this rebooting process.”

            I’m confused, what is the actual profile?

      • #2169504 Reply
        Susan Bradley
        AskWoody MVP

        I’m going to be the contrarian  here.  I have installed the February updates with no side effects.  I don’t think this is as widespread as the headlines is making this out to be.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        10 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2169509 Reply
          Mr. Natural
          AskWoody Plus

          I think we would not be affected as well but I’d rather not take the chance. Part of the reason being is that we frequently see updated patches to fix previously released patches. Sometimes within a matter of days. I figure a “new and improved” patch will be forthcoming.

          Red Ruffnsore reporting from the front lines.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2169523 Reply
        Cybertooth
        AskWoody Plus

        Does that mean that over an extended period of time the operator can click on the “Pause updates for 7 days” button more than five times provided that the last click does not extend the expiration date of the pause period to a date equal to or more than 35 days from the last click date?

        My head starts spinning when I ponder “pausing” updates vs. “deferring” them (or whatever) and how each of these update settings affects the others and also subsequent months’ patches.

        To my mind, conceptually it’s much simpler to approximate the Windows 7 updating experience with the Windows Update Manager.

         

      • #2169526 Reply
        dph853
        AskWoody Plus

        All this clicking on the pause update button promotes carpal tunnel syndrome.

        1. I use group policy to select option #2 – advise of availability but do not download updates.
        2. Use update settings advanced options to delay quality updates for 30 days
        3. Use wushowhide to hide any updates older than 30 days that I do not wish to install.

        Using this method, I only have to tinker with things once a month, usually after the MS-DEFCON level is adjusted a few days prior to the next patch Tuesday.

         

         

        • #2169534 Reply
          KYKaren
          AskWoody Plus

          Well, you have Win10/Pro.  Others don’t.

          Offline: Win7Pro ∙ SP1 ∙ x64
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-6500U ∙ RAM 12GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender
          Online: Win10Pro ∙ 1909.18363 ∙ x64 ∙ i7-8565U ∙ RAM 16GB ∙ SSD ∙ Firefox ∙ McAfee Internet Security ∙ Windows Defender

      • #2169532 Reply
        mentallo
        AskWoody Plus

        Any advice for those of us who can’t pause updates any further than, say, 2/25/2020?

        Quality updates have been deferred for 30 days under advanced settings and metered connection has been turned on. Anything else? wushowhide?

        • #2169538 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          The Metered connections should keep the CU from downloading, but I would be careful not to turn them off till you are ready to install. I don’t use Pause or Metered in Pro, only Defer and GP “2”. The reasons are explained by my experience at the bottom of the article referenced below.

          I have compiled some explanation of Windows Update in Win10 in AKB2000016. I have also included some of my experiences and the settings I use in Pro Edition. It’s not gospel,  just a guide. As I learn more, I will add that experience as well.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2169542 Reply
          Carl
          AskWoody Plus

          Metered connections works for me. But, I don’t know if this is true for Home versions. I’m running highly modified versions of Win 10 Pro (legitimate, licensed) with no associated Microsoft accounts – local account only.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2169533 Reply
        Carl
        AskWoody Plus

        In addition to pausing updates and GPO to prevent driver updates (I manually install all drivers direct from the manufacturer), I also set my ethernet connection to metered. This prevents all updates. I take this extra step because I’ve lost all faith and trust in the competency of Microsoft.

        Of course, the downside of doing this is you have to remember to turn metered connections off when you wish to resume updates. This may cause confusion for some.

        And finally, I’m still keeping my LOB Group B Win 7 Ultimate machines humming along nicely with ESU updates (thanks Harbor Computer Services). February patches installed without incident.

      • #2169567 Reply
        Brocktoon
        AskWoody Lounger

        I was the ‘advanced options‘ pause guy from the other thread.  As a recap, I’m running Win10 Home 1909 and prior to February’s patch Tuesday I could have hit the ‘pause updates for 7 days’ button up to 5 times which would have extended my pause up to 35 days out … or 3/14 in my case.

        BUT, instead I opted to go to advanced options and at the bottom of the screen I was allowed to select any date to pause WITHIN the 35 day window.  I chose to select 3/1.

        In the name of science and Team Woody I just tested the ability to extend the pause update via the advanced options date select.  What I found looks to jive with what most suspected.

        When I originally paused I was given any date out to 3/14.  When I went to the advanced options now, I was given the choice of selecting any date from tomorrow til 3/14.  Not 35 more days, but still working on the original 35 day window.  I chose to extend my pause from 3/1 to 3/8 … interestingly enough it looks like I could also go backwards and pick any resume date as early as tomorrow.  (who would do that?)

        After I selected the new date, I am now seeing ‘Updates will resume on 3/8’, and ‘pause updates for 6 more days’ … which lines up with my original 3/14 35 day limit.  Under advanced options I can still select any date between tomorrow and 3/14.  I’m assuming I can still extend later to 3/14 if I need.

        So … between the ‘pause updates to 7 days’ vs ‘advanced options’ … 6 of one vs 1/2 dozen … the advanced options route allows you to pick a specific resume date (and maybe go backwards) vs multiples of 7.  But no matter what you choose, once you do your 1st pause it’s ‘Final Answer/Locked In’ for 35 days.  You cannot extend the 35 day window

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2169572 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          That is correct. You have a maximum of 35 days any way you go. you can end the pause at any point you choose. But when you do, you cannot use Pause again until you have installed the pending updates.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2169628 Reply
        Bundaburra
        AskWoody Plus

        Presumably, at some point, either MS will issue a revised patch, or the MS-DEFCON level will be raised.  Hopefully, this will happen before the March updates are due.  There are, no doubt, other mods in this particular update which are worth having and would not cause problems.  As my anti-virus provider says,

        “Many threats rely on exploiting known security flaws. To prevent this from happening, software developers regularly release updates to fix these vulnerabilities and keep their applications more secure.

        As a user, it’s important that you always update your operating system, antivirus software and other applications when prompted and enable automatic updates wherever possible.”

        Some of that may be over-optimistic, but the overall principle is valid.

        Windows 10 Pro 64 bit 1909

        • #2169629 Reply
          Susan Bradley
          AskWoody MVP

          I doubt it.  At this point in the month they are ramping up to March releases.  It’s not widespread enough to pull it back and revise February.  It has to be really widespread (like the UEFI one) otherwise they won’t revise it.

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2169987 Reply
        abbodi86
        AskWoody_MVP

        https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/release-information/windows-message-center#394

        Status of February 2020 “C” release
        The optional monthly “C” release for February 2020 for all supported versions of Windows and Windows Server prior to Windows 10, version 1903 and Windows Server, version 1903 will be available in the near term.

        Are not we already passed C week?

        BTW, i have seen report about that temporary profile issue in Windows 7 too

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2170517 Reply
        rramer
        AskWoody Lounger

        Interestingly enough; back to the profile issue:

        my win 10 user is logging into a WinSvr 2013 with that very issue;
        it’s not affecting his local desktop; just his remote; unfortuneately he’s responsible for financial transactions on that machine; the only thing I’ve found to get around it is to reboot the server.  I’ve done the reg hacks for they make no difference!

        Some of your wisdom would be appreciated; or due to the patching scenarion the problem will remain until the patch is good on either the server or the W/S?

      • #2171033 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        I’ve just come from a Lenovo laptop where Wifi kept turning off with only options Manually or 1/4 etc hours access in future.  Win10 Pro 1909 was set for update intervals 0/0.  The system uses Kaspersky but has no profile error.  I uninstalled KB4532693, reboot, and wifi automatic connect recovered….

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2171298 Reply
        cyberSAR
        AskWoody Plus

        Just my 2 cents worth. We had a long weekend here and most of my clients have taken time off so I figured a good time to update. Updated approx 50 machines (mostly Dell and HP) and haven’t had any issues with all the latest updates applied.

      • #2173164 Reply
        barrym
        AskWoody Lounger

        I sent this to Ask Woody and they suggested I repost it here –

        Hi,

        My settings for updates is paused.

        However, the other day I restarted my pc and it said it was loading updates and carried on; I have the following version status now….

        So, in your opinion, what was the update? If it was a hack, I haven’t seen anything unusual.

        • #2173171 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          Try again.
          Using the Visual tab, put your cursor where you want the image to go.
          Then on the bottom left under the entry box, click on “Select File”.
          Choose the file you want to attach.
          Once it is attached, click on “Insert in content”
          It will appear where your cursor is.

          Attachments are limited to 1MB in size

    Viewing 28 reply threads

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    Reply To: No fix for the Feb cumulative update “lost profile” bug in sight. I suggest you Win10 1903 and 1909 customers make sure Pause Updates is engaged.

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