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  • October 5th is the date

    Home » Forums » AskWoody blog » October 5th is the date

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    #2386966

    B in the forums points out that Microsoft says October 5th is when Windows 11 comes out! Topic: Windows 11 to be released on October 5, 2021 @ AskWood
    [See the full post at: October 5th is the date]

    Susan Bradley Patch Lady

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    • #2387001

      Assuming that they stick with their 8th gen and up rule it seems that I will get a good long vacation until I retire this laptop and get another. Yes, I saw that I can indeed install it if I so choose but I will get no updates – but what is the fun of windows without the excitement of patch Tuesday debacles! 🙂

       

      Mint became nonviable for me when it failed to reliably connect with a HP P1102w laserjet printer. Heck, Dos 3.11 could work with printers 40 years ago. grumble grumble…

      - ThinkPad T570-20HA, i7-7600U, 2.8GHz, UEFI/GPT, 16GB, Sammy 256GB M.2 NVMe PM961. -

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2387012

        I don’t believe the no updates pronoucement is absolute. There has been some “clarification” since then. Updates may or may not work.

        --Joe

        • #2387020

          Like all of this we will simply have to wait and see, until someone reports that they are actually getting updates. 🙂

          - ThinkPad T570-20HA, i7-7600U, 2.8GHz, UEFI/GPT, 16GB, Sammy 256GB M.2 NVMe PM961. -

    • #2387021

      From the announcement:-

      “You can also check to see if Windows 11 is ready for your device by going to Settings > Windows Update and select Check for updates*.”

      I think we should be giving out regular warnings against selecting “Check for updates”, given that doing so automatically downloads and installs everything available to you, whether you want it or not. A lot of users will doubtless click on that thinking they’re getting information on Windows 11, when in fact what they’ll get is a load of useless and potentially troublesome optional updates for Windows 10!

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2387023

        Yes. “Never use “check for updates”. ”  would be a good rule to live by. (I use wumgr)

        - ThinkPad T570-20HA, i7-7600U, 2.8GHz, UEFI/GPT, 16GB, Sammy 256GB M.2 NVMe PM961. -

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2387769

        So how does one check to see what kind of updates are there in settings under Window Updates without downloading and installing them?  I know Susan suggests running only Window Defender updates when they come out on Patch Tuesdays, but how do I get to those updates and those alone without installing the rest until given the green light on those other Patch Tuesday updates?   Use the Microsoft Update Catolog?  Of course, the update number is required for that.

        I always have my Windows updates paused and do not update until again given the green light.   I am always fearful of clicking on “resume updates” lest all will download and install.

        Thanks.

         

         

    • #2387048

      I think October 31st is a more appropriate date for releasing Windows 11.

      Wait, I take that back.

      April 1

      "Censorship is thought control" ----- Ronald Reagan

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2387060

      For Windows, I’ll stick with Win 10 until it’s EOL – or beyond. I’m getting really frustrated with the continuing “change-for-change’s-sake” reworking of the UI, including changes in usability and the reduction of easy customization. Also tired of the trend for the Windows OS  to become increasingly a “nanny OS” and “advertising platform”. These trends may be fine for businesses and for the masses that just want an internet appliance, but they don’t sit well with me – or some others :

      https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/windows-11-usability-tweaks.html

      Win10 Pro x64 21H1, Win10 Home 21H1, Linux Mint + a cat with 'tortitude'.

      5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2387110

        Wholeheartedly agree.
        Win11, with the removal of some of the power user/admin tweaks and tools (such as right-click on Start menu)…very disappointing. At this point, I’ll run 10 until the wheels fall off. Probably have to switch to 0patch at some point, I would imagine – I’m ok with that.

        • #2387176

          Win11, with the removal of some of the power user/admin tweaks and tools (such as right-click on Start menu)…very disappointing.

          The Win+X Quick Link menu still exists in Windows 11:

          Open Win+X Quick Link Menu in Windows 11

          Windows 10 Pro version 21H2 build 19044.1319 + Microsoft 365 (group ASAP)

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2387299

            I was going to say if you are a power user, you use WIN-X and not the mouse. 😉

            • #2387379

              I think I am a power user, and I prefer the mouse. Please be tolerant.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2387534

              Forgot about the keyboard shortcut.
              Besides, most of the time I’m RDP’d in to a box and half of those times I’m on a Mac…. so keyboard shortcuts only get you so far. Mouse is easier to remember. 🙂

          • #2387753

            B
            Reading on at that site I see that it is possible to change whats on that menu!
            Why oh why did I never know this?? 🤡🙄

            🍻

            Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2387542

         

        The preview version I’ve been testing in a VM every so often still had the right click menu. In particular, I remember being happy that it included Windows Terminal, and not PowerShell or CMD, as Windows Terminal is a much nicer interface. This was actually my first exposure to Windows Terminal. I’d heard about it, but I expected it to be added to Windows 10 in an update, not require me to download it from the store.

        That said, I have a fairly large cumulative update to wait on now that I launched the VM again, so we’ll see if this was removed.

        (One thing I noticed and didn’t like is that I can’t launch the Task Manager by right clicking on the taskbar anymore, only by right clicking on the Start Menu. But, really, I should have it just launch with the system anyways.)

         

    • #2387057

      I’m so old I remember when people would sleep overnight at a computer store when a Microsoft release would come out.

      I’m so old I remember using V32 modems (but have fonder memories of V34 and later at home).

      Sound history of modem handshakes

       

      • #2387091

        My first modem was 300 baud (Commodore 64). Second one was 1200 (Commodore 128), then the third (in my first MS-DOS PC) was 2400bps. My first V.32, a US Robotics “Sportster,” if I recall, came after that, around 1992. Got it for an amazing $300 back in the day.

        As for people sleeping overnight at the computer store, I recall that happening just once, which was for the release of Windows 95. Was there any other time?

         

         

        Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, KDE Neon
        Dell G3 15/3579, i7-8750H/16GB, KDE Neon
        Asus P8P67 Deluxe, i5-2500k/16GB, KDE Neon

        • #2387184

          My ASR 33 teletype transferred data at 110 baud.  That was the “fast” device we used.  The other standard device we had used the 45.45 baud standard which I believe is still used today for RTTY (Radio Teletype) by the Amateur radio folks.  It was slow!

          When I moved up to a 300 baud modem connected to a dumb terminal, you’d a thought we’d discovered fire!  Boy was that “fast”.  But that was back when just about every new thing that arrived was an improvement and very desirable.

          Now we have the likes of Windows 8, 10, and 11, etc.  Pretty much no improvements and only additional headaches.  Yay!

          2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2387181

      I don’t mind new OS updates as I’ve been on every single version of Windows (either at home or office) since the first version came out all those years ago.  The big problems with Win 11 as I see it is the need to make the BIOS security changes that are currently part of the Win 11 requirement.  Computer manufacturers will adapt to the requirement but those of us how have PCs that meet the hardware specs for Win 11 will have to enable TPM and secure boot.  Hardware TPM chips are in short supply (they were always an add on for any mother board I purchased) and available at extortion level prices so CPU enablement is the path that most will take.  Sophisticated users won’t face any issues but other home users who might want to update will get frustrated.

      I wonder if Microsoft update will do a hardware scan and not even provide an option for Win 11 if the hardware and security requirements are not met.  The worst thing the company could do (and they just might) is provide the option and then it fails.

      • #2387543

         

        It seems to me that the required CPUs all have TPM build in, so it seems like the aren’t going to allow TPM chips at all. At least, not unless you do a clean install and give up on Feature Updates.

        • #2387549

           

          Finished my update, and I still have a right click menu.

          (Do note I upgraded from Windows 10, as I couldn’t get activated otherwise, and I wanted to test the Personalization options. I’m not sure why Microsoft didn’t do like Windows 8 and have give full features until RTM.)

    • #2387209

      Remember the Windows 95 launch? 24th August 1995 – and the “Start Me Up” promo video that was shown on TV: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0AJM6HMYjM

      Now there’s a pairing – Bill Gates & Mick Jagger!

      Arthur J Davis
      UK

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    • #2387428

      A basic question: “Where (and when) does the release of 21H2 fit into MS’ inspired scheme of upcoming events, or doesn’t it?”

    • #2387483

      Yes, I’m so old I fall asleep every month – usually the second Tuesday, while MS does their system invasion on my computer.  So much for their consideration for users during the Covid situation when everyone really needs stability. Lets hit ’em with Windows 11; that’ll keep them awake; and help MS with more invasive telemetry. Bah humbg MS.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2387503

        Indeed no stability in these covidtimes. Just an other opportunity to rush into more moneymaking.  What a missed chance to bring something good .

        ~
        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2387574

          What a missed chance to bring something good .

          MSFT have been good with opportunities, missed boats and wasting resources chasing shadows, clouds or even rainbows.

          | Quality over Quantity |
    • #2387602

      Ok so you’ll have to jump through more hardware hoops to run Windows 11. Or you can take your chances and see what Microsoft does if your hardware isn’t up to specs. Probably safer to just stick with Windows 10 until this all plays out for the early adopters to see what their experience is. For myself, I just want to wake up and use my computer, and not chase down some random crash or issue that found its way into Windows 11. I just am not all that giddy about what’s new in Windows 11 that I cannot wait a few months to see how stable it is.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2387701

      Since Microsoft seems to be sticking to its original hardware requirements (Intel 8th generation / Ryzen 2xxx or later, TPM 2.0) for Windows 11 for the most part, it means that my main system based on X99 and Broadwell-E CPU with no TPM won’t be able to run Windows 11 in an official and supported capacity.

      There probably will be ways to install Windows 11 to “unsupported” systems like mine, and I may test these procedures once they become well known on VMware virtual machines just to see what it is about. From what I can see at the moment there is nothing that can persuade me it is a worthy upgrade over Windows 10 LTSC, not to say Windows 7 or Windows 8.1. I am only going to test it in virtual machines but I won’t install it on any of my systems.

      Microsoft won’t stop you installing Windows 11 on older PCs
      You’ll be able to run Windows 11 on older PCs — if you install the update manually

      But it seems that Microsoft may decide to withhold updates, even security updates, if you take this route : Microsoft is threatening to withhold Windows 11 updates if your CPU is old

      I will just have to see if Microsoft really intends to do this, like what it did when blocking users from Windows Update when they ran Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 on “unsupported” CPUs like my first generation Ryzen 7 1700X.

      Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst.

      • #2388269

        MS may intend to do this perhaps with future W11 feature updates

        we’ll see if MS is “bluffing” or not when Win11 is generally released by that October date

    • #2387759

       

      Oops. I accidentally put this in the wrong place:

      Finished my update, and I still have a right click menu. (Do note I upgraded from Windows 10, as I couldn’t get activated otherwise, and I wanted to test the Personalization options. I’m not sure why Microsoft didn’t do like Windows 8 and have give full features until RTM.)

      I will say that, after the revelations about not getting updates, I would still not recommend anyone actually upgrade, even on supported hardware. Let a much slower uptake show Microsoft why this is a horrible idea. Let them be worried in 2025 about the much larger numbers of people still on Windows 10.

      Most regular users do not need a TPM. They don’t encrypt their drives. Secure Boot is useful, but it does not need a TPM. And Microsoft should not be able to try and kill the used PC market like this, when used PCs are often better than equivalent priced new PCs. (And your current PC is likely better than what you could pay $200 for).  If PC manufacturers want to compete, make better products. And, if  they can’t, then diversify into making other things. Don’t try to artificially push unnecessary upgrades.

    • #2387826

      I’ve had my very first Windows 10 PC a little over a month.  I probably won’t be switching to 11 until 10 is well into ESU.

      i7-10700k - ASROCK Z590 Pro4 - 1TB 970 EVO Plus M.2 - DDR4 3200 x 32GB - GeForce RTX 3060 Ti FTW - Windows 10 Pro

    • #2388816

      I’ll get it on October 5th…2025.

       

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