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  • OK Google. Say where is the taxi stand in Portuguese.

    Home Forums AskWoody blog OK Google. Say where is the taxi stand in Portuguese.

    This topic contains 35 replies, has 20 voices, and was last updated by  wavy 1 month ago.

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    • #2019437 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Most of the time new technology doesn’t mean much to me. Tell me that Microsoft has a new set of icons and I start snoring. Show me a fancy new laptop
      [See the full post at: OK Google. Say where is the taxi stand in Portuguese.]

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2019487 Reply

      WildBill
      AskWoody Plus

      The Assistant is very picky! I have to go “Say _____________ in Spanish” to get a verbal translation. Else, Google just does a search & shows me the results of the query. Meh… I may have an old phone (LG Tribute Dynasty running on Nougat 7.1.2), or Google Assistant/Translate isn’t up to snuff yet.

      Windows 8.1, 64-bit, back in Group A... & leaning toward Windows 10 V1909. As long as it's a Lot Less Buggy!
      Wild Bill Rides Again...

    • #2019495 Reply

      cyberSAR
      AskWoody Plus

      True story. About a month ago a guy stopped by here to offer his landscaping services. He spoke broken english and I guess he felt I didn’t understand him well enough so he broke out his phone, said something in spanish and it came back something similar to “This will help translate”. I thought WOW that’s pretty cool. Then he said something else into his phone and it replied along the lines of “I can help you sexy lawn orgy”.

      Took his card sent him on his way and threw the card in the trash.

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2019517 Reply

      anonymous

      So does this mean that some of the German PC Technology sites will get better translations. And some of those sites are a bit more thorough in their actual technical analysis than some of the English language  sites. But maybe try out some very technical translations on Google and see how that works before there can be the new sliced bread declared.

      Maybe for simple phrases and such or with not too complicated of a sentence structure and without modal auxiliaries and the subjunctive. But when things get complicated Google translate tends to produce things a bit more confusing and a little less clear.

    • #2019564 Reply

      Charlie
      AskWoody Plus

      I say it’s about time!  We are nearing the end of the 2nd decade of the 21st century.  It’s about time something’s being done about the language problem.  This could be the beginnings of the “universal translator” used in Star Trek.   🙂

      Win 7 Still Alive, x64, Intel i3-2120 3.3GHz, Groups B & L

    • #2019553 Reply

      anonymous

      “…The Hitchhiker’s Babel fish is almost here.”

      Lest we forget: “Meanwhile, the poor Babel fish, by effectively removing all barriers to communication between different races and cultures, has caused more and bloodier wars than anything else in the history of creation.”

       

      6 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2019559 Reply

      anonymous

      I’m Portuguese. Google always translates to Brazilian Portuguese and not to Portuguese of Portugal or European which is the mother country of this language ….. It’s not a Bus Stand (pt-br) but a Bus Stop (pt-pt)…… 🙂

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2019572 Reply

      Charlie
      AskWoody Plus

      They will eventually have both European and American versions.  Same applies to English; there’s the North American and then there’s the (oh my) 20 or more dialects spoken in the U.K.  That is unless they limit it to the Queen’s English.

      Win 7 Still Alive, x64, Intel i3-2120 3.3GHz, Groups B & L

    • #2019599 Reply

      anonymous

      For those “stuck” with a device or phone that has an older version of Android (versions numbers under 7, but over 4.4), I would suggest trying the Google Translate app. It’s good down to Android 5, Lollipop.

      I’ve looked at the specs for the Google Assistant that translates, and it is available as a separate app, but requires the device to have Android 5 and above with at least 1 gig of RAM or Android 6 or above but then it must also have at least 1.5 gigs of RAM.

      Android 5: Minimum of 1 gig of RAM

      Android 6: Minimum of 1.5 gigs of RAM

    • #2019615 Reply

      glnz
      AskWoody Plus

      Just got my first iPhone three weeks ago – I had a blackberry and flip phone until then.  Now I have an iPhone 7Plus.

      Can I do this on the iPhone?

      How?

      By the way, I don’t use Siri, so if I need it, please explain how to turn it back on.

      Yes, I’m the last man on the planet to get a smartphone.

      Thanks.

    • #2019619 Reply

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Man, imagine all the telemetry and de-anonymized data collection Google gets to do with this!

      Your literal voice print, precise location, sentiment analysis, the nature of your interests…. use it enough and they will have enough information to accurately impersonate your voice.

      No thanks.

      And to think, people lose their minds about Microsoft’s telemetry that collects comparatively benign stuff like “was there a delay when running the Start menu animation?” and “Is anyone actually still using Wordpad?”

       

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  warrenrumak.
      11 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2019627 Reply

        Cybertooth
        AskWoody Plus

        Yeah, if I could be certain that whatever I speak into my phone will remain strictly confined to the storage on the phone, then this would be an attractive feature.

         

      • #2019769 Reply

        MWmC
        AskWoody Plus

        I could not agree more. It seems that we have waves of protestations of innocence on the matter from whatever tech giant is caught out on privacy … only to have that same giant exposed for yet another violation not long after. I have an Android phone but don’t use Assistant, nor would i ever have one of those Alexa things, or equivalent, in my home.

        The thing that most infuriates me is that i seem to have to make the rounds of the various privacy options on my devices (Android, iPadOS, Windows) to ensure they are still set in my favor. Their manufacturers don’t seem to have a problem overriding my selections … but on what basis i cannot say. It might only be after major OS updates, but i cannot be certain.

        The bottom line is that makers of hardware and software are not being honest and honorable about letting us make our own privacy choices.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2019797 Reply

        UncleRemus83
        AskWoody Lounger

        Man, imagine all the telemetry and de-anonymized data collection Google gets to do with this!

        Your literal voice print, precise location, sentiment analysis, the nature of your interests…. use it enough and they will have enough information to accurately impersonate your voice.

        No thanks.

        And to think, people lose their minds about Microsoft’s telemetry that collects comparatively benign stuff like “was there a delay when running the Start menu animation?” and “Is anyone actually still using Wordpad?”

         

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  warrenrumak.

        I don’t like the idea of forced telemetry on my PC that I can’t just shut off.  I have no problem with it shipping on by default, just give me a toggle that disables it totally, that’s all I want.  But I  could not agree with you more about Google.  I am still sort of surprised Woody is so in love with Google, arguably the worst anti-privacy company on the planet.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2020158 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody_MVP

        Man, imagine all the telemetry and de-anonymized data collection Google gets to do with this!

        Your literal voice print, precise location, sentiment analysis, the nature of your interests…. use it enough and they will have enough information to accurately impersonate your voice.

        No thanks.

        And to think, people lose their minds about Microsoft’s telemetry that collects comparatively benign stuff like “was there a delay when running the Start menu animation?” and “Is anyone actually still using Wordpad?”

        I couldn’t agree more. I’m not sure why there is such a furor over Windows telemetry, while there isn’t much noise about the universality of Google spying.

        If you want to compare how much Google vs Microsoft spies on you, surf the web with Firefox, with NoScript installed. At every website you visit, click the NoScript button to see what is running in the background. Pretty much every site you visit will be running Google scripts in the background; however, pretty much no sites you visit will be running Microsoft scripts in the background.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
        • #2022632 Reply

          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          RE NoScript
          If you visit some sites that you REALLY want to use and trust them you can hit ‘Temporarily Allow all Scripts on This Page ” What is scary is some times you can do that 6, 7, 8 or more times before every thing is loaded. A half a dozen layers of redirection sucking in what ever. 🥵

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
    • #2019633 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Google already offers a translation of words from one language to another simply by typing the word — or sentence –in a Google search using any commonly used browser (FF, WF, Safari, Chrome…)

      I do that very often in my laptop from English to another language and vice versa, to and from a variety of languages; is it any different when googling something in a cell phone? Notice that the “laptop” query is made using text, not voice; that gets around the “voice print” and “sentiment analysis” mentioned earlier by warrenrumack. As to “location”, well… any Google search, I think, rats on you, including where you are when using Google to do your search, unless (maybe if) you prevent it by having “do not track” (or some equivalent option) selected in the browser setup.

      Word of caution: sometimes you do not get the translation right away, but a series of “hits” to dictionary / translation sites instead. Also, the translation is not always “spot on”.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W + Mac&Lx

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2019690 Reply

        EyesOnWindows
        AskWoody Lounger

        Just use Google and search for the single word translate. That brings up a form that lets you choose input and output languages as well as a microphone button to input the phrase as well as a speaker button to say the phrase in the language chosen. The initial Detect language option is usually sufficient.
        Search Google for translate
        For example type
        Hasta la vista → Bye
        This selects the input language as Spanish.
        Bye
        If you click the swap languages
        button you’ll get:
        Bye → Adiós
        Click it again and you will get:
        Adiós →Goodbye
        Play with it a bit and you will find this English to Spanish translation:
        so long → hasta la vista
        The Spanish to German translation is interesting:
        Hasta la vista → Bis später
        Swapping languages gives:
        Bis später → Hasta luego

        HP Compaq 6000 Pro SFF PC / Windows 10 Pro / 1803
        Intel®Core™2 “Wolfdale” E8400 3.0 GHz / 4.00 GB
        EyesOnWindows

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        • #2019846 Reply

          wavy
          AskWoody Plus

          That little microphone icon is not there in my browser, what am I missing? Palemoon latest W10 Pro 1909

          🍻

          Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
          • #2019874 Reply

            EyesOnWindows
            AskWoody Lounger

            Google Chrome.
            “Google Chrome is up to date
            Version 79.0.3945.79 (Official Build) (64-bit)”

            That’s what I was using to produce what you see. I just tried the same thing using the latest version of Firefox. Neither microphone button appears there.

            Back in Google Chrome, the colorful one’s hint says “Search by voice”. The gray one’s hint says “Translate by voice”. I tried neither as I do not wish to make my voice bio-metrics available to the world thru Google just as I do not provide that opportunity to Microsoft thru Cortana.

            HP Compaq 6000 Pro SFF PC / Windows 10 Pro / 1803
            Intel®Core™2 “Wolfdale” E8400 3.0 GHz / 4.00 GB
            EyesOnWindows

            3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2019706 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Well, I made this experiment with the “reverse” feature of “translate”: I asked it to translate a sentence in Latin to its English equivalent, then to reverse the order going back from the Latin translation to, presumably, the English original. I did a few such back-and-forth operations, one after another. After four of those, “Translate” went into a stable loop. The original English sentence was: “Here he rides his horse”, the end result after several back-and -forth was: “and horses”, going through some very curious transmogrifications of the sentence along the way.

      So:”Tabinde ut Interpretari” (That, according to “Translate”, means “So much for Translate”)

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W + Mac&Lx

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2019719 Reply

        EyesOnWindows
        AskWoody Lounger

        The information loss due to translation is certainly spectacular in Latin. Catalan (old French) is a bit better, with Italian spot-on. Just imagine the consequences of misspellings and synonyms on translation.

        English ⇄ Latin
        Here he rides his horse → Hic invectus equis → The horses → et equorum ↔ and horses

        English ⇄ Catalan
        Here he rides his horse → Aquí cavalca el cavall → Here the horse rides ↔ Aquí el cavall cavalca

        English ⇄ Italian
        Here he rides his horse ↔ Qui cavalca il suo cavallo

        HP Compaq 6000 Pro SFF PC / Windows 10 Pro / 1803
        Intel®Core™2 “Wolfdale” E8400 3.0 GHz / 4.00 GB
        EyesOnWindows

    • #2019722 Reply

      Paul T
      AskWoody MVP

      Here he rides his horse

      Can you translate that to English please? 🙂

      cheers, Paul

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2019875 Reply

        EyesOnWindows
        AskWoody Lounger

        Perhaps a bit of context would help. See “Annie Oakley and Buffalo Bill’s Wild West by Isabelle S. Sayers”, page 58 (in the caption at the bottom of the page):

        68. A stirring moment in any performance of the Wild West was Buffalo Bill’s entry into the arena; here he rides his horse Duke. (Montgomery Ward Ethnological Series stereograph; photocopy by Dolfinger)

        HP Compaq 6000 Pro SFF PC / Windows 10 Pro / 1803
        Intel®Core™2 “Wolfdale” E8400 3.0 GHz / 4.00 GB
        EyesOnWindows

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2019757 Reply

      Mele20
      AskWoody Lounger

      I am not a public figure. I have no interest whatsoever in allowing Google to find yet another way to try and own me. I suppose Woody feels that the percentage of folks who place great value on privacy is too small consider.

      I will continue to avoid ALL Google stuff (blocking all in my hosts file) and will continue to fight for privacy by deliberately buying only iPhones and smart watches, using browsers that care about privacy, and blocking all that I can in Windows that tries to deny me privacy. But this is NOT an ideal answer to the issue as Mitchell Baker points out in a recent interview with the Guardian.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2019759 Reply

      jabeattyauditor
      AskWoody Lounger

      continue to fight for privacy by deliberately buying only iPhones and smart watches

      Isn’t that like buying a Chromebook because you don’t like Microsoft’s telemetry?  🙂

    • #2019790 Reply

      Noel Carboni
      AskWoody_MVP

      Welcome to the 21st Century. We may resist privacy incursion, but once those who compete with us for things, status, position, etc. throw caution to the wind and begin using more technology than we choose to use, then that technology becomes essential, we will have no choice.

      At one point I told myself, I’ll never want a Smart Phone. Then I got a job where 2 factor authentication and intra-office chat and eMail and teleconferencing are a necessity. Guess what’s in my pocket now?

      The other day my wife and I were on a walk… On a whim I woke up my smart phone and asked, “Hey Google, who was the actress in Jurassic Park II?” because I couldn’t think of Julianne Moore’s name. The answer came forth instantly verbally, augmented with photos.

      Maybe we should worry less, delve in, become masters of the new tech, and not be left behind so quickly. So what if our life’s savings will be taken from us before we die? That was probably going to happen anyway.

      -Noel

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2019795 Reply

      Noel Carboni
      AskWoody_MVP

      I wonder what the feedback loop is for Google Translate?

      I mean, if “Where’s the bathroom?” got changed in meaning to “Tell me how to get to the dump” in another language, and thereafter people just kept getting directed to Mount Trashmore just outside of town by shrugging and head-shaking locals, what process is in place to teach the translator that it’s made a subtle mistake?

      -Noel

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #2019898 Reply

      Speccy
      AskWoody Lounger

      The debate goes on whether technology is morally neutral or not but, IMHO, one reasonable middle way might just be that, in the end, albeit morally neutral in the end technology is used in service of people’s values – either in good or bad ways: warrenrumak’s concerns are as pertinent as Noel Carboni’s pragmatism is legitimate.

      Back to the topic, Anon is right: Google translates to Brazilian Portuguese rather than European Portuguese (probably because Portugal has a population of 10 million people while Brazil population is over 200 million people).

      As EyesOnWindows and OscarCP pointed out, subtle language differences between the two countries and back-and-forth translations often lead to confusing results (to make a comparison, consider the meaning of American English words and expressions such as “sneakers”,”second floor”,”in school” and the British English equivalents: “trainers”,”first floor”,”at school” – see where this is going?).

      One small example: shoelaces. The Portuguese (pt-PT) word for it (“atacadores”) is “cardaços” in Brazil (pt-BR). An European Portuguese asking a native Brazilian “Como se apertam os atacadores?” [How do you put your shoelaces on?] will get a weird, slightly afraid look from the Brazilian dude: to him, that question sounds a bit more like “How do you press an attacker?” because the Portuguese expression “um atacante” (an attacker) has the same meaning in both countries (someone who is physically threatening you) but whereas in Portugal, the word “atacador” has one single meaning (a shoelace) in Brazil, it could also be a synonym of “atacante” (an attacker)… thus, unless the Brazilian guy actually faced an angry burglar armed not with a gun but with a pair of big, heavy shoes 🙂 it is pretty obvious how silly the results are!

      Not only that, but also Google Translate often does a poor job translating Brazilian Portuguese to English. For e.g. the question “Como apertar os cadarços?” (pt-BR) translates to “How to tighten the shoelaces?” but the same question “como apertar os cadarços?” (pt-BR) all lowercase translates to “how to fasten the shoelaces?” (fasten the shoelaces? really? like, say, fasten your seat belt?)…

      There are a few, less-known alternatives to Google Translate – often with better results. DeepL is one such example of a tool providing rather decent results. I left as an exercise to our readers trying to translate the above Portuguese question (“Como se apertam os atacadores?”) into different languages – German, Italian, etc – and then those results back to English… and compare the Google Translate results with the DeepL results.

      Edited for content. Please stay on topic. The topic is machine translation of languages, not the merits of the countries of origin.

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Bluetrix.
      • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Bluetrix.
      • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Speccy. Reason: Rephrased last sentence
      • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  PKCano.
      • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  PKCano.
      • #2019948 Reply

        Cybertooth
        AskWoody Plus

        Last time I checked, machine translation had a loooong way to go. I remember a set of slides we did once, that for fun we put through Google Translate (EN–>SP). A “double-blind test” became the Spanish equivalent of “two-shutters test” (prueba de dos persianas), while a certain “mean cholesterol level” for a population became an “evil cholesterol level” (“nivel malvado de colesterol“).

        Edited for content

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Cybertooth.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2020039 Reply

          Speccy
          AskWoody Lounger

          Last time I checked, machine translation had a loooong way to go (…)

          LOL 🙂 I’ve seen a lot of that, too. Two enlightening and memorable examples of how blindly Google Translate is sometimes used as a lazy way to label consumer products were a permanent ink marker (“marcador de tinta permanente”) being described as “an ink pen with thick and permanent stroke” (badly translated to “caneta de tinta espessa e acidente vascular cerebral permanente”) or a power supply cable being translated to “cabo do poder” (lost in translation)…

          Edited for content.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2019937 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      The problem of translating from one language to another when the original is salted with localisms and manerisms that are peculiar, not just to a certain place, but to a particular period of time, can be hard enough for a person, however fluent in both languages. But a machine, however “intelligent”, has an even bigger disadvantage: it is simply not practical to have it learning, whenever the occasion presents itself, haphazardly, over many years, accumulating information that sometimes might be repeated often and sometimes might be encountered just once, but it is lo sufficiently memorable to be remembered by a person who has heard or read it, long after the event. So we can build a huge fund of information in the living data base of our brains from which, with enough practice born out of the need to understand what is being said or written, can be retrieved as needed. Machines, however capacious their built-in memories might be, have the practical limitation that they cannot accumulate so much information just by hanging around in the world for many years and also have a functional difficulty figuring out if the information they come up with actually fits the context of a conversation, something that makes them prone to make, for example, weird or embarrassing translations, as Noel Carboni amusing example shows really well.
      Over the eons of human evolution we have ended up with brains that are capable of communicating with words, spoken or written, often with speed, accuracy and little effort. Language is a huge help in life; it has, for example, kept our ancestors for countless generations safe from being eaten by lions, because someone that saw the lions come around and, even from a distance could give them a pretty good account of where and how many of those were around and what or whom they might be planing to have for lunch. The result of all this very long process is that we tend to be pretty good at using words, however incompetent we might be at many other things. Machines, on the other hand, not so much.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group B & macOS + Linux (Mint) => Win7 Group W + Mac&Lx

      1 user thanked author for this post.

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    Reply To: OK Google. Say where is the taxi stand in Portuguese.

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