• On This Date – Computing History

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    #2419851

    21st January
    1953 Paul Allen was born.

    Historical Computing Event:
    April 4th 1975 – Microsoft was founded as a partnership between Bill Gates and Paul Allen to develop and sell BASIC interpreters for the Altair 8800.

    1953-2018 Paul Allen, RIP

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    • #2420011

      You can also thank Paul Allen and his family for the USS Indianapolis Project, it was quite a surprise to know that it had been found.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2420089

      23rd January

      Historical Computing Event:
      On this date 1996, the first java programming language JDK 1.0
      developed by James Gosling at Sun Microsystems was released.

      "-rw-rw-rw-" extreme computing
    • #2420663

      24th January
      Apple Computer Inc

      Historical Computing Event:
      1984 Apple Computer Inc unveils its revolutionary Macintosh personal computer. The first mass market computer to employ a GUI, together with a prominent TV advert directed by Ridley Scott during the Superbowl XVIII between the LA Raiders and Washington Redskins.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MnrJzXM7a6o

      On January 24, Apple Computer will introduce Macintosh. And you’ll see why 1984 won’t be like 1984.

      unlike nowadays eh

      mac

      "-rw-rw-rw-" extreme computing
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    • #2420675

      Also with the one-button mouse!

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

    • #2421245

      26th January
      Windows Computer Worm

      Historical Computing Event:
      2004 Mydoom: (aka – my.doom, W32.MyDoom@mm, Novarg, Mimail.R and Shimgapi) was initially tagged by McAfee employee Craig Schmugar who discovered it.
      This nefarous e-worm was initially spotted on computers in North America that distributed it’s payloads rapidly to cause $38 billion in damages. To this day holds the highest recorded financial damage caused by a computer worm.

      "-rw-rw-rw-" extreme computing
    • #2422150

      30th January

      Historical Computing Event:
      1982 A 15 year old, Richard Skrenta, writes the first apple in-the-wild computer virus. This code was 400 lines long and disguised as an boot program called “Elk Cloner”. The confessed ‘prank’ was later discovered to be an Apple DOS 3.3 boot sector virus spread by floppy disk to Apple II systems and displayed the following:

      ELK CLONER:
      THE PROGRAM WITH A PERSONALITY

      IT WILL GET ON ALL YOUR DISKS
      IT WILL INFILTRATE YOUR CHIPS
      YES IT’S CLONER!

      IT WILL STICK TO YOU LIKE GLUE
      IT WILL MODIFY RAM TOO
      SEND IN THE CLONER!

      "-rw-rw-rw-" extreme computing
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    • #2423180

      4th February

      Historical Computing Events:
      2004 Mark Zuckerberg launches Facebook from his Harvard dormitory room creating a now, globally familiar online virtual social media platform.
      Whilst Just yesterday, parent company Meta seen it’s share price plummet around $230bn/£169bn in stock market value ooops! 🙂

      2014 Satya Nadella succeeds Steve Ballmer as CEO of Microsoft.

      "-rw-rw-rw-" extreme computing
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    • #2423520

      6th February

      Historical computing event:

      This one is not just historical, is transcendental:

      The patenting of the integrated circuit (IC) on February 6th, 1959:

      https://earthsky.org/human-world/this-date-in-science-microchip-patent/

      Integrated-Circuit

      And then, seven years later, this application of the IC idea started a fast, profound and lasting revolution in computers’ hardware and consequent capabilities:

      https://www.ibm.com/blogs/think/2019/11/ibms-robert-h-dennard-and-the-chip-that-changed-the-world/

      The patenting of the IC followed its invention the previous year:

      https://cybernews.com/editorial/revolutionary-day-the-birth-of-the-integrated-circuit/

      Excerpt:

      Over six decades ago, Jack Kilby submitted one of the most consequential patents in human history.

      ….

      On September 12, 1958, Kilby presented his summer project to TIs management, including the head of the company Mark Shepherd.

      ….

      It’s difficult to overstate the importance of the integrated circuit (IC). Alternatively known as a microchip, the device has virtually created the world we live in today.

      Virtually, all modern devices rely on microchips to power any computer’s logic components, the microprocessors. Basically, if the device requires more ‘brain’ than manual operation, it likely depends on the IC.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

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      • #2424855

        ? says:

        thanks, Oscar. pardon my hooking on to your post. i forgot to post on February 10 and didn’t want to get dates out of sync. i was watching the Decades tv program and they highlighted when the reigning World Chess Champion Garry Kasparov finally lost to IBM’s Deep Blue supercomputer in 1996…

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_Blue_versus_Garry_Kasparov

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    • #2424809

      12th February
      Intel i740 Graphics (first)

      Historical Computing Event:
      1998 Intel unveils its 1st graphics chip i740 (Auburn)
      The new build PC market was targeted by intel with this AGP GPU that came with 2mb to 8mb Vram. The GPU was clocked at 66MHz and the AGP version utilized the ‘system memory’ to produce AGP textures!
      choking up the AGP bus bandwidth with textures in both directions

      "-rw-rw-rw-" extreme computing
    • #2425080

      14th February

      Historical computing event:

      February 14, 1946 John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert unveil the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer (ENIAC):

      https://www.computerhistory.org/tdih/february/14/

      First modern electronic digital computer. Based on the principles elucidated by the group that designed this machine, today known as the “the von Neumann general computer” that set the pattern all modern digital computers are built according to:

      • A central processing unit (CPU) that contains an arithmetic logic unit and processor registers.
      • A control unit that contains an instruction register and program counter.
      • Memory that stores data and instructions.
      • External mass storage.
      • Input and output mechanisms

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Von_Neumann_architecture

      https://www.britannica.com/technology/von-Neumann-machine

      Excerpt (emphasis mine):

      “[The] von Neumann machine, [is] the basic design of the modern, or classical, computer. The concept was fully articulated by three of the principal scientists involved in the construction of ENIAC during World War II—Arthur Burks, Herman Goldstine, and John von Neumann—in “Preliminary Discussion of the Logical Design of an Electronic Computing Instrument” (1946). Although many researchers contributed ideas directly or indirectly to the paper, von Neumann was the principal author, and it is frequently cited as the birth certificate of computer science.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

      • #2425094

        14th February

        (Another) Historical computing event:

        And, as it happens, the 14th of February 2011 was also the first day of a three-days “Jeopardy” contest between the IBM’s “Watson” AI program running on a supercomputer/server farm that contained a huge database of facts of the kind likely to be asked at “Jeopardy”, confronting the 17-straight game winner Ken Jennings and also another champion, Brad Rutter … that Watson won. Jennings signaled his resignation by saying: “I welcome our computer overlords.”

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watson_(computer)

        This was an epoch-making demonstration of the advances in computer science and practice that made possible a “Watson” that could, with very little help, interpret natural language, the way questions and comments were being made, and sort out which were directed at it, parsing these, determining their probably meaning and providing the answers most likely to be relevant to the questions — more often than not the correct ones, as well as an occasional wise-guy remark:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P18EdAKuC1U

        That is why it (and the IBM team that developed it) won. By a lot.

        Watson.wins_.jeopardy

         

        Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

    • #2426125

      17th February
      Windows 2000 retail released.

      Historical Computing Event:
      Released to retail on the 17th February 2000, this was one of my favorites.
      With minimum system requirements of a 133MHz Pentium processor, 64 MB RAM, 2 GB hard disk and a CD-ROM drive.

      Fancy a nostalgic read:
      More info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_2000

      I had this working on an Virtualbox VM a few years back for a nostalgia trip down memory lane when things just worked! Still have the Pro Edition CD and service packs SP4 being the last official with an update rollup 1 for SP4 being the very last from microsoft

      "-rw-rw-rw-" extreme computing
    • #2435296

      30th March 1951

      Census Bureau receives the first UNIVAC 1 computer:

      https://www.computerhistory.org/tdih/march/30/

      The US Census Bureau receives the first UNIVAC I computer, the first commercial computer to attract widespread public attention. Although the Census Bureau began using it at the end of March it was not actually moved to the Census Bureau until a few months later. The UNIVAC was capable of completing 1,905 operations per second, which it stored on magnetic tape. The Census Bureau had helped drive the development of devices that eventually led to computers, beginning with Herman Hollerith’s 1890 punch card machine.

      More to read about this event and its significance here:

      https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/univac-computer-dedicated

      Excerpt:

      UNIVAC and other first-generation computers were replaced by transistor computers of the late 1950s, which were smaller, used less power, and could perform nearly a thousand times more operations per second. These were, in turn, supplanted by the integrated-circuit machines of the mid-1960s and 1970s. In the 1980s, the development of the microprocessor made possible small, powerful computers such as the personal computer, and more recently the laptop and hand-held computers.”

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2435911

      Apple was founded 46 years ago, on April 1, 1976

      The Apple of 1976 should be unrecognizable compared to today’s gigantic corporation, and yet key early decisions by Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and more, are still having an impact today.

      Tim Cook marked the 45th anniversary of Apple with a tweet looking back to his friend and colleague, co-founder Steve Jobs.

      “As Apple celebrates 45 years today, I’m reminded of Steve’s words from many years ago: “It’s been an amazing journey so far, yet we have barely begun.” Thanks to every member of our Apple family for all you’ve done to enrich lives. Here’s to the next 45 years & beyond!”…

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      • #2436038

        It will be 47 next year. Hardly an auspicious anniversary.

        cheers, Paul

        • #2436201

          Because 47 is a prime number? Or some other reason?

          Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

          MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
          Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
          macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

    • #2435962

      The Apple IS falling far from the tree these days, isn’t it?🌳

      🍎😁

      🍻

      Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.
      • #2435965

        wavy: For better, for worse, or for about the same, only with a different, more modern look?

        As I had mentioned already in some older comments, I had two Macs in a row torching their motherboards, when I was using the early desktop models, back in the late 80’s. Fortunately, they were not mine, but my employer’s, and there was no evidence that it was my fault: I was told this had happened before. I have not heard, afterwards, of this happening again to people I know and who have been using Macs since they started working with them, decades ago. And my Mac has not burned the motherboard — nor anything else — after more than four years since I bought it.

        Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

        MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
        Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
        macOS Monterey; browsers: Waterfox "Current", Vivaldi and (now and then) Chrome; security apps. Intego AV and Malwarebytes for Macs.

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