• Ongoing list of problems with this month’s Win10 Creators Update cumulative update KB 4038788

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    #133363

    @MrBrian has been knocking them back. Officially acknowledged: After installing this update, some users may observe performance or unresponsiveness is
    [See the full post at: Ongoing list of problems with this month’s Win10 Creators Update cumulative update KB 4038788]

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    • #133376

      Yep, have definitely had issues with Edge. Just when I was beginning to think it actually could be a decent browser too. Wasn’t random either, all three of my Creator PC’s had the same issue at first with Edge.  I think some even said Internet Explorer had some issues too.

      • #133378

        Please see my comments here. and the discussion following, about some problems in IE11. Although this was in Win7, other versions may have similar problems.

    • #133382

      I can’t install it at all. It just gets to 98% or so then says “We couldn’t complete the updates”, “Undoing changes”, “Don’t turn off your computer”.

      CouldntCompleteTheUpdates

      This happened to me as well around 15063.2xx and at the time I ultimately reinstalled Windows 10 from the released ISO and was finally able to apply the update. I could not explain why it happened, nor was there information that any level of geek prowess could extract in any of the known log files.

      So I tried it again this week with a freshly installed 15063 and nope, it gives the same error in the same way.

      Windows 10 is just broken. With problems like this, and NO WAY for even an experienced Windows tech to diagnose them, it’s simply not a serious system worthy of another look by a business user who needs to rely on the system for work. And it’s not getting any better over time.

      No part of “We couldn’t complete the updates” is sufficient in a system with the moniker “Pro”.

      -Noel

      7 users thanked author for this post.
    • #133390

      What can I say – happy beta testing :).

      Antec P7 Silent * Corsair RM550x * ASUS TUF GAMING B560M-PLUS * Intel Core i5-11400F * 4 x 8 GB G.Skill Aegis DDR4 3200 MHz CL16 * Sapphire Radeon 6700 10GB * XPG GAMMIX S70 BLADE 1TB * SanDisk Ultra 3D 1TB * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Windows 10 Pro 22H2 64-bit
    • #133428

      Both Noel Carboni and lurks about hit the nail on the head about Microsoft. This is what happens when a company stops listening to their customers. I will only add this. Microsoft is fast becoming a issue at the national security level.  The last major corporation to see this kind of attention at the national level was the old AT&T. And we all know how that ended. Redmond is now treading in very dangerous waters. As I have said before, this will not end well for them.

    • #133435
    • #133444

      I installed the .NET September Security-Only patches to 2 machines a few days ago, with no apparent problems (both Win7 x64).

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #133479

      I’ve written a blog post about the black screen during login on HP machines
      Fix for HP’s update KB4038788 login black screen issue
      The problem are conflicting registry entries between HP and Microsoft for some .NET entries.

      Günter Born

       

      Ex Microsoft Windows (Insider) MVP, Microsoft Answers Community Moderator, Blogger, Book author

      https://www.borncity.com/win/

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #133527

      Good News! According to Ed Bott,

      “Anecdotally, I can confirm that I’ve heard far fewer complaints about Windows 10 issues this year than I did following the initial rollout and the Anniversary Update. And Microsoft says that its new, more measured approach to updates is paying off in performance and reliability improvements.”

      ZDNet: Facing complaints, Microsoft adopts a kinder, gentler Windows 10 upgrade pace

      I’m sure that makes everyone feel better about Windows 10 /sarcasm.

      • #133531

        Anecdotally, when Anniversary Update rolled out, Microsoft tossed millions of Win10 users under the upgrade train.

        With Creators Update, the pace has been much slower (although we’ve been fed “adoption” numbers that soft-sell that idea), and the volume of screams has lowered.

        The problem we’ll be facing in the near future is the 6-month upgrade pace. If Microsoft slows down on its pushed upgrades – which is a very good idea – they’re going to start bumping up against that 6-month time limit.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #133590

        Well, as I wrote in the other thread, when half a year after releasing a new version you come up with something like this:

        https://www.neowin.net/news/microsoft-admits-to-gaming-performance-issues-in-windows-10-creators-update

        then it means something REALLY bad is happening in Microsoft. When one of the major features is Game Mode and there are problems with such popular titles as Overwatch or Battlefield 1 then much more work should be applied to testing BEFORE releasing it to public. Not 5 months after.

         

        EDIT: Regarding the article itself, my ThinkPad T460s was downgraded from W8.1 to W10 AU in August and although I have no precise measurements, I get the feeling battery life has worsened quite a bit (although I don’t use Edge at all, maybe that’s why 🙂 ), so I am not so excited about all those battery life improvements AU -> CU they mention.

        Antec P7 Silent * Corsair RM550x * ASUS TUF GAMING B560M-PLUS * Intel Core i5-11400F * 4 x 8 GB G.Skill Aegis DDR4 3200 MHz CL16 * Sapphire Radeon 6700 10GB * XPG GAMMIX S70 BLADE 1TB * SanDisk Ultra 3D 1TB * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Windows 10 Pro 22H2 64-bit
    • #133569

      With Creators Update, the pace has been much slower (although we’ve been fed “adoption” numbers that soft-sell that idea), and the volume of screams has lowered.

      It’s tragic that we find ourselves in a situation where “lowering the volume of screams” from the customers is an improvement.  Tell us again how this is wonderful for us, Microsoft?

      Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, KDE Neon
      XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/32GB & GTX1660ti, KDE Neon
      Acer Swift Go 14, i5-1335U/16GB, KDE Neon (and Win 11)

    • #133572

      From Black screen when Windows 10 restarts after a Windows update on some OEM factory-imaged devices:

      “An update to resolve this issue is now available. We recommend that users who have affected devices apply this update immediately.”

    • #134175

      September 25, 2017—KB4040724 (OS Build 15063.632) is available. Two of the issues listed at KB4038788 are not listed at KB4040724.

    • #133408

      @Noel,

      Unless a person is in complete denial, W10 is little more than an OS which is in perpetual beta test mode. I am personally amazed how MS continues without some sense that a major course correction is required. Truly sad!

      • #133417

        (Awaiting moderation)@Noel,

        Unless a person is in complete denial, W10 is little more than an OS which is in perpetual beta test mode. I am personally amazed how MS continues without some sense that a major course correction is required. Truly sad!

        The above is quoted from an anonymous post, which may not be able to be approved yet, but I did want to respond…

        Right! It’s NO more than that.

        It has occurred to me, more than once now, that Microsoft wants / needs / expects Windows to just wither and die. It seems likely they want to get out of the computer operating system business entirely. I wouldn’t have imagined that to be a possibility, but when you’re too big to fail and have country-sized savings accounts to fund whatever you want to do for years and years, maybe this is how you get out of a particular facet of business.

        There would be those who would say business won’t let them out of continuing to be their OS vendor, but you can always make a pill so bitter that even companies backed up against a wall can’t palate it. Who knows, by pricing WaaS through the roof maybe Microsoft will make even more money while killing Windows.

        It’s kind of a shame, really, because what’s left is… Unix. And (with apologies to those who like it) that’s just not IMO a system worthy of being the world’s computing engine.

        -Noel

        8 users thanked author for this post.
        • #133420

          I believe MS is a crossroads and they have to make choice: be an enterprise software oriented company, be a cloud oriented company, or try to do both. The first builds on their current position. It basically treats consumers as found money, any MS products they buy is just a little extra in the pockets. It also is not cloud/mobile first but attempts to add business oriented features to their existing products. The second jettisons their current strengths and positions. This is a risky strategy. If done wrong the risk is alienating both current and future customers at the same time. Doing both, which I think they are trying to incompetently, implies a lot of attention is being given to the new groups at the expense of the old. If the old groups are starved too badly effectively this becomes option 2.

          MS has forgotten that PCs need OSes and companies need software to function. Companies are often more willing to use a subscription than consumers. It is a boring market but potential a continuous profitable one and definitely less fickle than the consumer market. If they are conceding the OS and related software market, someone else will step in.

          4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #133427

          It certainly is a shame because Windows 7 and although I’ve never used it, I am inclined to take your word for it about Windows 8.1 as well are both just the OS’s that businesses and home users alike need and want. The evidence for that, at least in W7’s case, is in the numbers as it’s still just under 50% even now. Nadella is running MS into the ground IMO.

          With regard to Unix/Linux, I also agree. I have been messing around with Linux and I do like it and will be trying (as soon as I have the motivation and spare change) to get it up and running on it’s own hard drive and set up an NAS on it. However, I can admit that it’s not ready for the big time just yet. It (Zorin/Ubuntu in my case) still has a ways to go in the user friendly/ease of use area as there are several things that are way more difficult than it needs to be and certainly more difficult than doing the same task in Windows. It has potential for sure and is better than I expected it to be, it just takes more work to get it the way you want it the first time you’re trying to figure it all out.

          I do think that Linux will continue to make big strides (if they are smart) with the upcoming EOL for Windows 7 coming up and Windows 10 in no way, shape or form being a viable successor to it or even better than a Mac from what I hear. It’s going to be interesting to see what happens with this situation and how much the alternative OS’s step up their game. I am fairly sure of one thing, though; the desktop computer is in no way becoming obsolete. It may even see a resurgence depending on how all this plays out. People don’t want Windows 10, though. That much is obvious.

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          • #133522

            Sessh wrote:
            It (Zorin/Ubuntu in my case) still has a ways to go in the user friendly/ease of use area as there are several things that are way more difficult than it needs to be and certainly more difficult than doing the same task in Windows.

            Interesting post. Was wondering what desktop environment(s) you’ve been using for your testing, and also hoping you might provide more specifics about key items you found to be way more difficult than it needs to be and certainly more difficult than doing the same task in Windows. What are your specific “deal-breakers”. Thanks.

        • #133452

          It has occurred to me, more than once now, that Microsoft wants / needs / expects Windows to just wither and die. It seems likely they want to get out of the computer operating system business entirely.

          I’ve said the same thing.  There’s no other explanation that makes sense… MS has had a tin ear before, but they’ve never reached the level of epic stupidity it would take for them to think that the way they are going about things now is going to keep Windows viable into the future.

          It seems to me that 8 was a panicked attempt to play catch-up with Google and Apple by trying to use the desktop as a stepping stone, and when that failed in spectacular fashion (even though 8 stripped of Metro/Modern is pretty good), they decided to give it one last Hail Mary shot, and at the same time begin the process of scuttling Windows while they monetize it short-term.

          If that Hail Mary had worked and somehow app devs had been convinced to start writing UWP apps for the Windows Store, and this resulted in significant adoption of Windows phones, the plan to deep-six Windows could be placed on hold or reversed.  Of course, MS was probably painfully aware that this last desperate attempt would probably be too little, too late, and indeed, it has turned out to be exactly the case.

          As such, the plan to destroy Windows appears to be very much “on.”  Right now, the revenue from MS monetization of Windows (beyond the traditional means) is minimal, but certainly, the cash saved by not having to pay beta testers and offloading that task to the home and SOHO users (by means of the forced updates, to ensure that the latest build is tested, and the telemetry that can’t be disabled… what good is beta testing with no bug reports?) helps the bottom line considerably, which of course was the intent behind letting all those testers go.  As such, the permanent beta quality of 10 (and of the patches for other Windows versions) is itself a form of monetization of Windows.

          I’m a little more optimistic about the ability of Unix-like OSes to run the world.  To a very large degree, Linux is already doing that, running servers, embedded systems, nearly all supercomputers, all kinds of IoT things, most routers, from consumer level on up.  About the only place it’s not often found is on the desktop, but with Microsoft sabotaging Windows and Apple still refusing to sell their OS (also *nix based) to people who don’t also buy their hardware (which many of us never will), there looks to be no other choice.

          Desktop Linux development has been moving at a snail’s pace compared to Windows, but with its all-distro combined market share hovering around 2%, it wouldn’t be under active development at all if it were (solely) a commercial product, in all likelihood– so all things considered, it’s doing better than a Windows release would be if Windows had 2% of the desktop market (which is obvious, given that MS appears to have given up on Windows even while they still have 90% of the market, let alone 1/45th that).

          It remains to be seen what effect the pending exit of MS from the desktop market will have on Linux development.   The surge in interest in Linux on the desktop should speed development and provide the impetus to fix the things Linux still doesn’t do as well as Windows.  Right now, there’s just not the interest to drive the resources to drive the development.

          It seems that the PC community is in for some interesting times.  I’m already better off than I was when I first realized where Windows was headed, as my experience so far with Linux has shown me that I can live without Microsoft. If MS is really doing this, it doesn’t look like any of us will have a choice– and that includes the program developers.  Right now, Linux is too small of a market to attract their attention, but that will definitely change if MS is leaving.

          Dell XPS 13/9310, i5-1135G7/16GB, KDE Neon
          XPG Xenia 15, i7-9750H/32GB & GTX1660ti, KDE Neon
          Acer Swift Go 14, i5-1335U/16GB, KDE Neon (and Win 11)

          4 users thanked author for this post.
    • #133441

      > Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. For more information see KB4043345.

      Looks like that I am forced to decline this update. I can not release this update to the clients with the knowledge that those bugs are in this update.
      What is making me sad that the solution seems to be to wait for the next fix… Which is just the next broken CU of next month.

    • #133575

      Creators hit my primary PC a few months ago. There were no issues except possibly a printer driver got squirrelly. I had to use Device Manager to remove it. Then the driver install was problematic as it wouldn’t find the printer’s scanner, I manually installed that portion of the driver and all was fine again.
      Then my second PC got Creators Update. It hosed Homegroup.
      The solution, for my stuff, was to shut down the newly updated PC. Then the primary PC was able to create a new homegroup and password. I left the primary on and the homegroup window open. (there was a warning about an existing Homegroup in this window)
      The secondary came on and homegroup accepted the password. Then a reboot of the Primary finished fixing Homegroup.
      So far, no other issues.
      I have home edition.

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