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  • Open 7Zip and Other Archives on a Mac using The Unarchiver

    Posted on Nathan Parker Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody support Non-Windows operating systems macOS Open 7Zip and Other Archives on a Mac using The Unarchiver

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      • #2190901 Reply
        Nathan Parker
        AskWoody_MVP

        AskWoody mentions the usefulness of installing 7Zip on Windows. Mac users can’t install 7Zip, but there is still a useful tool that can open 7Zip files.

        It’s called The Unarchiver. Not only can it open 7Zip files, but it can also open a ton of other archive formats that Archive Utility (the built-in tool in macOS that opens ZIP files and other compressed files) can’t open. It even opens Stuffit files (Stuffit was heavily used to compress files in older Mac days, especially the Classic Mac OS).

        I’ve successfully used this on a number of large files, and it does a flawless job, even on my older iMac.

        So for those who are stuck needing a tool to open files Archive Utility cannot handle, give The Unarchiver a try. It’s free and easy to install and use.

        Nathan Parker

      • #2190940 Reply
        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        Nathan, in the Mac I have to open files that frequently have been, for example, archived with tar first and then compressed with gzip. I can do this just by double clicking on them, no need to do it from the command line. Do you know if this simple action opens files compressed with other types of compression? To do the opposite, create an archive and compress it, I need to use the command line, which is not a problem, just mildly inconvenient.

        Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • #2190945 Reply
        Nathan Parker
        AskWoody_MVP

        What you’re describing is the Archive Utility tool (built into macOS) I mentioned above. It extracts some, but not all formats (7Zip and Stuffit being two it didn’t, The Unarchiver handles those, plus others Archive Utility can’t).

        I downloaded The Unarchiver, and so far I cleared all of the settings and just have it set to unarchive 7Zip and Stuffit files (since I know I need it for those). As I come across other formats Archive Utility can’t handle, I’ll enable those in The Unarchiver, with the end goal allowing Archive Utility to handle what it can and have The Unarchiver take up the rest (since it can also be set to replace Archive Utility, but I’d rather let Archive Utility handle what it can and let The Unarchiver handle the rest).

        Nathan Parker

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2190947 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        To do the opposite, create an archive and compress it, I need to use the command line

        Not according to this site. It’s right click, Compress.

        cheers, Paul

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2190948 Reply
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Thanks, Paul T: I didn’t even know about Zip, as it has never come my way before. It has always been ‘compress’ (foo.Z) or ‘gzip’  (foo.gz) or ‘tar’ (foo.tar) or a combination (several.files.tar.gz,) until I read that article you gave me a link to. A very neat thing to know. And entering “tar” in the command line, then dropping several files on the Terminal icon and presto! one gets a tar archive with all those files inside. I wouldn’t have figured that out in a thousand years.

          Live and learn. Live, and learn.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • #2190951 Reply
        Nathan Parker
        AskWoody_MVP

        Paul is correct on right-click, Compress. I use it all the time.

        I have un tar’d stuff from the Command Line as well. It just depends on which was the best option at the time I was working.

        Nathan Parker

      • #2195533 Reply
        Nathan Parker
        AskWoody_MVP

        Someone also recommended this to me as another option. It can even create 7Zip files from a Mac:

        https://www.keka.io/en/

        Nathan Parker

        • #2198291 Reply
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Nathan, I was reminded, thinking about what has been posted here, mainly by you, that can be important to have something, in the Mac, that one can use to decompress files that have been compressed in Windows machines, and also to compress files that are then sent to someone with a Windows machine. So one reason for getting something else, besides tar, zip or gzip, that either come with the Mac, or one usually installs them there, at some point, would be to make possible to exchange, as described above, compressed files between a Mac and a Windows PC.

          Not a trivial consideration, as I have found myself having to do these things several times in the past. It helps that I have both a Mac and a Windows 7 PC, but would be nice to do all those things with just one computer, for example the Mac (without resorting to installing Windows in a VM on the Mac). Is any of the applications you have been looking into, good for exchanging files, compressed with some of the kinds of compression usual to each of the two systems, between Macs and Windows PCs?

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2198649 Reply
        Nathan Parker
        AskWoody_MVP

        Between these two utilities (and Archive Utility included with a Mac), you should be able to compress and extract just about anything you’d need without the need of a Windows PC. There’s also Stuffit Deluxe and Stuffit Expander if you need more power with Stuffit files.

        With these utilities, you’ll be able to swap files between Macs and PC’s easily.

        My goal in some of my columns has been to find apps that make it easier for Mac users to work with Windows PC’s without the need of having to keep a Windows VM on. While I have access to a Windows VM for work, I try to force myself to do everything I can on a Mac, hence why I keep coming up with additional solutions to post here on how to make working on a Mac easier.

        Nathan Parker

        1 user thanked author for this post.
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