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  • Patch Alert: Here’s where we stand with the June patches

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Patch Alert: Here’s where we stand with the June patches

    This topic contains 78 replies, has 37 voices, and was last updated by

     Cybertooth 1 week, 4 days ago.

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    • #200063 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      Full article in Computerworld Woody on Windows.
      [See the full post at: Patch Alert: Here’s where we stand with the June patches]

      7 users thanked author for this post.
    • #200098 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I posted this today in another thread, but I think that here is probably more on topic:

      Does anyone here knows if other MS products, such as Office 2016 (the version that users install and run in their PCs, not the “Cloud” one) still have quality checkers?

      I know that “Windows” quality checkers were fired, but it does not necessarily follow that all those in charge of other MS applications have received the same treatment, particularly as those applications are (presumably) developed and (certainly) sold separately from the OS and also to non-Windows users, such as those with Macs. Thus, the question.

      • #200127 Reply

        OscarCP
        AskWoody Plus

        I should explain: I have seen no issues I can recall with any Office patches so far, for several months, unlike the situation with the patches for various versions of the Windows OS. I find this difference suggestive. Having bought Office both for my Windows 7 and macOS machines, I am interested. Maybe I am not the only one here?

        Griping about MSdeeds is fine, but perhaps one should also look at the larger picture now and then?

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #200102 Reply

      mcbsys
      AskWoody Lounger

      Woody, thanks for your diligence in monitoring and reporting patching news. I wonder if you could consider posting a cross-reference to ComputerWorld articles after the post is there, and including a link. Knowing that a post will show up somewhere else, at an unspecified time … isn’t exactly driving traffic to ComputerWorld :).

      • #200104 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        Once the article is up on ComputerWorld, Woody adds the link to the thread on the main blog page. I don’t see it yet on ComputerWorld, so the link isn’t active yet 3:50pm CDT US.

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #200112 Reply

          mcbsys
          AskWoody Lounger

          As an RSS subscriber, I get the initial blog post immediately, but I’m not notified when it is updated. If the point is to inform people about a new article and get them to read it, I think it would be more helpful to send out a “post published” announcement than a “post coming” announcement.

          • #200115 Reply

            PKCano
            Da Boss

            Article is up ComputerWorld Woody on Windows.

            5 users thanked author for this post.
          • #200196 Reply

            woody
            Da Boss

            It’s a chicken-and-egg problem. I need to set up the post in AskWoody so I can reference it in Computerworld. Then, once it’s published in Computerworld, I go back and add the link to AskWoody. I then usually tweet it.

            … except when I get called away. When that happens, it can take hours for me to get back to updating the link. PKCano has kindly filled in for me on link duty lately.

            5 users thanked author for this post.
            • #200368 Reply

              anonymous

              Just a quick note, first thread post might need updating as it still says “Article coming in Computerworld.”

            • #200836 Reply

              woody
              Da Boss

              That’s an artifact of the way the links get generated. I can change it manually…

    • #200132 Reply

      Zaphyrus
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well Mr.woody said it,   1803 isn’t ready to be installed and I AM SO happy to wait.  I am in no rush in upgrade, in fact if it were for me, I would have stayed with Windows 1507.

      Just someone who don't want Windows to mess with its computer.
    • #200144 Reply

      Mr. Natural
      AskWoody Plus

      Awesome post Woody. I agree 100%.

      Red Ruffnsore reporting from the front lines.

    • #200167 Reply

      KarenS
      AskWoody Lounger

      Just a quick question knowing we are still on Defcon 2 and I am still waiting to do updates when Woody changes the level to Defcon 3 or higher….Is it safe to say that if our 2 home pcs (windows 7, group A) are completely updated with all security monthly quality rollup updates up to and including May 2018 (KB4103718) and we have had NO issues,  would June’s monthly rollup (KB4284826) be safe to install?

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #200177 Reply

        Kirsty
        Da Boss

        Hard to say with any patch, until it’s installed! That’s why Woody has taken to advising taking a system image backup before applying patches, in recent months.

        It might be fine, but be prepared for the worst first 😉

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #200251 Reply

          KarenS
          AskWoody Lounger

          I guess therein lies the problem being an absolutely non techie and having next to no experience with computers I have NO idea how to do an image backup! Guess when the time comes I will just have to cross my fingers, say a prayer and hope for the best!!

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #200264 Reply

            Cybertooth
            AskWoody Lounger

            @karens, you can start with these threads: https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/macrium-reflect-free-edition-v7-1/

            and

            https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/idiot-proof-step-by-step-guide-to-backing-up-creating-image/ (never mind the thread title 🙂 ).

            Good luck, and don’t hesitate to post here if you run into any problems.

             

            6 users thanked author for this post.
            • #200271 Reply

              Elly
              AskWoody MVP

              Good information @cybertooth!

              @KarenS- You could start your own topic, so that it is easier to track any questions or issues you are facing. @cybertooth gave good references, but there is a lot of information there, and getting from identifying as non-techy to feeling secure that you can recover easily is soooo important to learn. Believe me, you don’t want to have to restore from scratch… and there are a lot of things, not just patching, that can affect your computer… and creating an image is the least techy way of protecting what you have now, come what may! (Yes there are on-line back up solutions for your data that are set and forget- but having recently reinstalled from my OEM restore disks, I can tell you that just rubbed my nose in how exactly non-techy I am… and I had no idea of how much work it was to uninstall the unneeded extras, redo all my settings, and reinstall the programs I like to use).

              PS- it is best to put your back up on a separate hard drive or USB stick, in case your hard drive fails completely… a separate partition will die with the hard drive, so don’t get stuck thinking you have to partition your drive. If you don’t have a separate medium to back up to, a partition is better than nothing before patching… but you really need to establish a regular back up routine that insures your ability to recover, whether it be from patching, fire, floods, earthquakes, theft, or other loss. Your data matters. Keep it safe!

              Win 7 Home, 64 bit, Group B

              3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #200291 Reply

              Kirsty
              Da Boss

              There’s also some very good backup information in the External Hard Drive topics (yes, it will take a little reading):
              https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/external-hard-drive-options/
              https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/external-hard-drive/

              3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #200630 Reply

              JohnW
              AskWoody Plus

              I have been relying on image utilities for many years to save my bacon from updates gone awry, hard disk failures, malware, fat fingers, etc.

              It may require a small learning curve regarding terminology and concepts, but it is really not difficult to do.  Programs like Macrium Reflect are probably the easiest I have ever encountered.

              1. Creating an image makes an exact complete snapshot in time of your hard drive exactly as it was at the time the image was taken.

              2. No decisions need to be made about what files/folders to back up.  Everything goes!  Simple!  This image is stored in an image container file on another physical drive.

              3. This image job can be scheduled and run in the background while you continue to run Windows normally.  You can store multiple versions of backup images, up to the physical capacity of the secondary drive.

              4. Restoring an image to recover a computer means overwriting the current data on your hard drive with that from a stored image file.  Macrium has an easy wizard that builds a bootable recovery drive (CD or USB flash) to boot your system with.  Just boot with this, and have your latest good image file available on a connected drive.  Restore.  It’s that easy!

              I realize that there are always questions lurking about which of the new patches will affect us.  Everybody’s system is different, so there will never be a 100% safe answer to that.  You will only know once you patch!  Knowing that you can easily roll your entire system back to the way it was earlier is a huge stress reliever!  Once you do this, you will never want to go back!  🙂

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #1790948 Reply

              Morty
              AskWoody Plus

              Mea culpa.

              I’m getting ready to put on my chain mail and sally forth to do battle again with the dragon.

              2019-05 Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 3.5.1, 4.5.2, 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2, 4.8 for Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2 for x64 (KB4499406)

              I bring that up here only to confess that I, being of little faith, have backslided to using Windows 7 built-in backup, instead of the the recommended ones.

              I have EaseUS installed, but frankly never made friends with it. And I’m clueless about how to check the files it saved. And Macrium…well I’m not ready for a new learning curve. My armor is rusty and so am I.

              At least I know that Windows Backup will still be there if everything goes awry.

              At some point, the tools became the masters rather than the slaves. I need to simplify my computing so it works for me, not the other way around.

              Am I making a mistake?

               

            • #1791110 Reply

              Cybertooth
              AskWoody Lounger

              Hi @morty,

              I’ve had decent success with Windows 7’s built-in system backup functionality. It works.

              For me, the main issue with it is that if you want to keep more than one single system backup, you have to be careful to rename the existing backup folder, otherwise Windows will simply overwrite the old image with the new one.

              When my wife got her Windows 10 computer (ugh) two years ago, at first we would use that vestigial Win7-style built-in backup function. But over time this got to be very tedious, having to go in and manually rename the previous backup’s folder so that it wouldn’t disappear into the ether when the new backup was created. Eventually I put her on Macrium Reflect, and she’s now to the point where she can almost go through the whole system imaging process by herself without need of me. (Uh-oh…) Certainly it’s less work for me, as she wouldn’t dare mess with things like renaming folders lest irretrievable damage ensue, so I would have to do it for her.

               

            • #1791306 Reply

              anonymous

              Morty, CyberTooth, anonymous 6536 here. You do release that this is posted in an 2018 June post right?

              Morty, when you get ready to install May 2019 patches again put it in a newer thread like this one. >> https://www.askwoody.com/forums/topic/ms-defcon-4-its-time-to-get-the-may-2019-windows-and-office-patches-installed/

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #1792011 Reply

              Cybertooth
              AskWoody Lounger

              Hey 6536!

              I did notice that Morty’s post was in this old thread, but I couldn’t think of a way to reply to him such that the reply would be in a more current thread and he would see it. Your solution is probably about the best that can be done.  🙂

              Speculating here: maybe Morty got caught by that strange problem the last couple of days, where very old posts were showing up in the “recent replies” section over on the right-hand panel, and thought that “June” in the title meant this June.

               

              • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by
                 Cybertooth.
      • #200275 Reply

        Geo
        AskWoody Plus

        I’m group A  Win 7×64 and install everything except anything marked “Previews”.  You don`t need previews if your a home user.  No problems

      • #200322 Reply

        Seff
        AskWoody Plus

        @karens, you’ve answered your own question – as a non-techie you shouldn’t consider it safe to install the June updates until Woody raises the DefCon rating to 3 or higher, and then in accordance with the accompanying article.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #200411 Reply

        anonymous

        Your question evolved into the need for making backups, which is always highly recommended for a lot of reasons.

        Back to your original question. It is my understanding that while each Group A Windows monthly update is cumulative, it only installs what isnt already installed on the computer. It does not do a complete reinstall of the entire update.

        As such, it would seem that if you are up to date thru May your system has already dealt with the loss of the lan nic issue with no problem. (Mine had no problem with May or had no problem with June).

        That is not to say the June update could not expose yet another issue, thus good idea for a backup, but I’m thinking the lan nic issue is unlikely to affect you.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #200168 Reply

      Noel Carboni
      AskWoody_MVP

      Windows 8.1 continues to hold the title as the most stable version of Windows. Hard to believe.

      Believe it.

      Uptime50Days

      -Noel

      Attachments:
      7 users thanked author for this post.
      • #200178 Reply

        Kirsty
        Da Boss

        No restarts needed after applying updates, then?

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #200222 Reply

          Noel Carboni
          AskWoody_MVP

          Updates are the only reason I need to reboot. It’s funny; even nVidia display drivers don’t need reboots any more, but Microsoft has just stopped trying to develop patches that don’t require it.

          That screen grab above was the end of a 50 day run before I applied updates on June 15 that required a reboot. Sometimes I am too busy with real work to take the chance on an update breaking something or slowing something down so I delay the “patch day” a while. That’s what happened this time.

          My Reliability Monitor would be jammed at the top too except that when I’m developing software applications failures I cause while testing occasionally get tallied as Application Failures or Warnings. Note no Windows failures…

          ScreenGrab_NoelC4_2018_06_28_081332

          And this is no dust-gathering system… Trust me when I say this workstation gets hard use.

          -Noel

          Attachments:
          3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #200241 Reply

            johnf
            AskWoody Lounger

            Noel, isn’t the reason MS patches require a reboot is that otherwise you can’t update the Registry?

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #200274 Reply

              ky41083
              AskWoody Lounger

              No, the registry can be updated live. MS doesn’t want to put the R&D into dynamically reloading updated OS components, and so forces a reboot to load updated components.

              MS actually was going to make reboot-less updates a feature of Vista I believe, and (like many other significant Windows improvements) completely abandoned the project… I don’t recall reading anything that stated MS’s reason for doing the ole “mission abort” on this one…

              2 users thanked author for this post.
            • #200332 Reply

              Noel Carboni
              AskWoody_MVP

              Noel, isn’t the reason MS patches require a reboot is that otherwise you can’t update the Registry?

              I don’t believe a reboot is ever necessary per se. The OS is sophisticated enough to facilitate reboot-less updates, as mentioned above.

              But you have touched on something that bothers me a lot…

              At first it wasn’t possible to run a Microsoft operating system forever. It was not designed to have a free for every allocate, a close for every open…

              Then came NT, which was built upon Digital Equipment Corporation designs for real, serious, sustainable operating systems that really could be run forever. It took a while, since Microsoft didn’t initially want to follow ALL the right paths with it, but finally in the mid to late ’00s the system got to where it could be run virtually forever.

              Things were going in the right direction, then… They weren’t. Suddenly, in the early to mid ’10s it became okay – even expected that a system should be rebooted frequently.

              The PROBLEM with this is that Microsoft could – and will – take shortcuts and not do good designs and implementations that CAN actually be run forever.

              Right when we need technology to be more reliable than ever… Do we need self-driving cars that need regular reboots? Systems that manage folks’ health 24/7 that need reboots?

              I don’t know what savings they THINK they’re going to get from not having to work so hard to make high quality software, but we’ve already seen better. There is no room for worse.

              -Noel

              3 users thanked author for this post.
            • #200342 Reply

              anonymous

              I have an old Linkstation NAS which runs on linux and which I telnet in and use for a lot more than just file storage which has been running without a reboot for nearly 2 years.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #200247 Reply

            Jan K.
            AskWoody Lounger

            Heh… my Win7 Reliability Monitor has been on “10” since Ms had problems with Windows Update a year ago (the funny: “Windows Update has stopped working” followed by “Updates were installed succesful”).

            Could I scroll even further back, we would find the amazing GWX experience.

            Summary: any of the problems were all caused by Ms.

            Updated latest patches yesterday, no problems but took for-ever… more than an hour! But of course I only have a 100 Mbit connection… sigh.

          • #200287 Reply

            Kirsty
            Da Boss

            Sometimes I am too busy with real work to take the chance on an update breaking something or slowing something down so I delay the “patch day” a while.

            That’s the situation I get caught in, several times a year, too. I’m sure many business-use machines are also cautiously patched for the same reason of needing to keep on “just working” 🙂

            4 users thanked author for this post.
            • #200333 Reply

              Noel Carboni
              AskWoody_MVP

              The longest I’ve run a Win 7 system without encountering a need (such as updates, a hardware change, etc.) to reboot is a bit over 6 months, and somewhere around 3 months for Win 8.1.

              I actually have a fair number of scheduled jobs that keep my systems busy 24/7, which is reasonable if a system is this stable – but not at all reasonable if some “as a service” [nonsense] has it rebooting whenever Microsoft sees fit.

              -Noel

      • #200186 Reply

        radosuaf
        AskWoody Lounger

        Yep. Hope it keeps up that way until 2023.

        MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Aorus Radeon RX 570 4GB * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 1809 64-bit
        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #200235 Reply

          WildBill
          AskWoody Plus

          I hope so, too. My fear is that when Windows 7 has completely reached end of life in Jan. 2020, Microsoft starts targeting Windows 8/8.1 the same way it’s targeted Win7. Since Win7 is still running on a good chunk of machines & challenges the Win10 monarchy, it has been more suspect to ‘update’ bugs in the last year or so. This is IMHO… but as Batman (allegedly) said: “Just because you’re paranoid, it doesn’t mean they’re not out to get you.”

          Windows 8.1, 64-bit, now in Group B!
          Wild Bill Rides Again...

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #200245 Reply

            anonymous

            If I recall correctly, GWX appeared at the end of July, 2015, roughly 4 years, 5 months, and change before Windows 7 End of Extended Support.
            And while M$ has said a GWX will never happen again, you can probably bet your bottom dollar that Nadella and his minions have Win 8.1 at least obliquely in their sights.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #200180 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Plus

      Winows 7 with the June Security Only update is holding stable for me — so long as you avoid any of the pitfalls with regards of any persistent NIC settings in the registry. The patches for Meltdown have been revised such that the impact on overall computer performance appears to have been reduced, and in fact enhanced when backing up a computer.

      8 users thanked author for this post.
    • #200220 Reply

      HiFlyer
      AskWoody Lounger

      Griping about MSdeeds is fine, but perhaps one should also look at the larger picture now and then?

      Tiny bit larger pic: Maybe M$ wants to continue selling that product line, not dump it?

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #200239 Reply

        WildBill
        AskWoody Plus

        I believe Microsoft abandoned Win8.1 a long time ago. No manufacturers are installing Win 8.1 on new machines, because they’re in lockstep with Win10. MS forced Win8 users to upgrade to Win8.1 by Jan. 2016 or face end of life. Whether Gartner was in MS’s pocket or not, they basically killed a Win8.1 Enterprise version by recommending that Win7 Enterprise users upgrade to Win10 Enteprise, & Win8.1 users downgrade to Win7. Win8 Enterprise had no upgrade path due to this, IMO.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_8.1#Enterprise_adoption

        Windows 8.1, 64-bit, now in Group B!
        Wild Bill Rides Again...

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #200240 Reply

      AlexEiffel
      AskWoody_MVP

      Yesterday, I read an interview with Satya Nadella. He describes that one of the keys to his success lies in the transformation of the culture and how they adopted a system of metrics linked to customer satisfaction like actual usage and tied their compensation to it to help that happen.

      Sounds like it is very possible some side-effect of this is if you don’t have the satisfaction level you need to get your compensation, you will make it happen, maybe by let’s say, pushing a feature too fast and maybe forgetting to honor some deferral settings so everyone can have the joy of trying the buggy thing…

       

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #200246 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        If you go by the netmarketshare.com results, Windows 7 continues to be the most popular desktop OS in the world, and it hasn’t had any new features in the better part of a decade.  What it did have, until very recently, was all of the stability and reliability one would expect from an OS that has not had any new features added in many years, but was still being patched for bugs and security issues, leading to an ever more stable code base over time.

        Given the enduring popularity of Windows 7 (and of XP in the years before), it seems quite evident that the route to customer satisfaction doesn’t go through “Add a lot of new features at random so we have bullet points to list in the press release”ville.  If MS is trying to improve customer satisfaction, they might try actually giving the customers what they’ve been asking for, begging for, or demanding since the introduction of Windows 10.  I don’t think the customer base for Windows could have been any more clear than we have in communicating to MS what we need from an OS.  They’re either lying to us or lying to themselves about the whole “customer satisfaction” thing.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.16 & Kubuntu 18.04).

        11 users thanked author for this post.
        • #200328 Reply

          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Now there are some misguided people out there looking for ways to dump Windows for Linux, either dual booting with Windows, or running it on a virtual machine, or installing it after plain reformatting the disk. Or even using Macs! Go figure.

        • #200365 Reply

          woody
          Da Boss

          We have a couple of pulled posts.

          Please, folks, you can contribute to the conversation without lashing out at individuals.

          5 users thanked author for this post.
      • #200283 Reply

        Elly
        AskWoody MVP

        He describes that one of the keys to his success lies in the transformation of the culture and how they adopted a system of metrics linked to customer satisfaction like actual usage and tied their compensation to it to help that happen.

        Actual usage might not be an indication of customer satisfaction… case in point, how many people have spent hours and hours, trying to prevent or recover from bad updates? The bad updates keep them working in Windows… but there is absolutely no customer satisfaction in it. How many people give up and leave useless apps on their desktop… which shows they are there (incentivized adoption rate?)… but those same apps are really despised? Again, not an indication of customer satisfaction. How many people have struggled to return settings to what they want to use, only to have them reset again… and the fact that they are using those settings is not customer satisfaction, but control exerted by Microsoft. Actually, it looks like Nadella is rewarding employees for locking customers more firmly into features and apps that they can’t escape, rather than rewarding actual customer satisfaction. Seriously, not one person I know is happy with their Windows experience since GWX. Slavery and submission might satisfy those with power and control issues… but no one should confuse that with success because something is really valued, chosen, and adopted by preference, because it is actually the best. Nadella has not been successful in engendering customer satisfaction along with W10 adoption. It might be the most despised and fastest abandoned OS… definitely earned that title in my circle of family and friends!

        Win 7 Home, 64 bit, Group B

        7 users thanked author for this post.
    • #200252 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      Now Sets is getting pulled from RS5, the only real point to make for 1809 will be a dark theme for Windows Explorer…. making it yet another Win10 version update that adds very little and gives very minimal incentive to upgrade. Maybe instead of 6 months, you guys (MS) do a 180 and decide to do these yearly? Or, maybe, crazy idea here… work on better patch management instead of trying to implement features that are half baked and that you eventually pull the plug on and remove anyway?

      Very stagnant time in Windows land IMHO. People are best staying put (as much as possible) with whatever they have, while MS keeps spinning their tires. Unless you have 1803, which in that case, clean install something, anything else. 😀

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #200254 Reply

        woody
        Da Boss

        I haven’t seen any compelling features in RS5 (probably “1809”), but I haven’t looked very hard.

        With 1803 we have a minor incentive — Timelines, which only work with Edge and Office. And we have a major disincentive — pulling the update deferral settings back into Group Policy.

        Can anybody point me to anything significant that I missed?

        Upgrading Windows twice a year makes absolutely no sense. At all.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #200269 Reply

          anonymous

          Totally agree with Woody. My Win 10 Pro on 1709 has just got stable enough that I like it now. I would like MS to go back to Service Packs once every 2 or preferably 3 years, but that is not going to happen. Thank you Woody and patrons, I watch the Defcon status and update / upgrade when Woody says it is ok. Feature Upgrades are mostly Bells & Whistles that I do not appreciate. Remember when users could download programs that they liked ? We can still do that of course, but the Dedoimedo article says 1803/4 is changing things to what MS wants.

        • #200297 Reply

          zero2dash
          AskWoody Lounger

          Even 1709 was feature-barren, really. I think the only reason why I upgraded to 1709 when I did was because of Defender’s new protection against encryption malware (even though I have a Backblaze subscription so everything is already backed up), but that has been an inconvenient “bust” for me as far as I can tell (in testing). It works, but it’s overly aggressive to the point of annoyance, so I turned it off.

          In 1803, Timeline is useless to me because I don’t use any “apps” or Edge, and I don’t use MS Office. On top of it, 1803 has been rife with issues, so there’s absolutely no incentive there to upgrade either.

      • #200358 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        Maybe not having any attention-grabbing new features is a good thing.  Perhaps it signals an update that will focus on internal, under-the-hood stuff that has been broken by the previous feature updates.  Perhaps it also signals that MS isn’t trying so hard to come up with features for the sake of features as it once seemed to be!

        I’m not a fan of the “release early, release often” software development model, but if one is going to do it, by all means, do it right.  Mozilla, unfortunately, decided to follow Chrome (everywhere, heh) into the rapid-release schedule, but most new Firefox releases are only incrementally different than their immediate predecessor.  Of course, Mozilla never called the releases “feature” releases, thereby creating the expectation that each new point release would have new features.  If a new feature is being developed, Mozilla worked on it until it was ready for release, then released it in whatever the next release was at that point.  They took their time with things like 64-bit support for Windows, e10s, and Quantum (which I wish they’d skipped, but that’s not the point here).  They released big feature updates when they were ready, not when it was a convenient time for marketing purposes.

        The rapid update schedule and the very concept of “release early, release often” were designed around open-source development methods.  They don’t necessarily translate to the closed-source, proprietary model.  Marketing has a seat at the development table in closed-source, whereas open-source scarcely has any marketing at all.  MS has let marketing desires drive the entire WaaS process, and marketing seems to be its only point at all.  That would be an example of how to do it wrong.

        MS releasing a new build whose only features were a new theme for Windows (they’re all over DeviantArt, for free!) sounds like a step toward doing it less wrong, at least.  We’ll have to watch and wait, of course, but if all the updates began to be for things that actually needed fixing, that would be a massive improvement.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.16 & Kubuntu 18.04).

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #200268 Reply

      EP
      AskWoody_MVP

      wow woody. you said in your latest article that Windows 8.1 continues to be the most stable version of Windows. I think I’m glad I did not upgrade my dad’s Toshiba touchscreen laptop from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10. Didn’t want to mess with a good thing 🙂

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #200451 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        We do have some Win8.1 laptops at the office. Yep, all of them are quite stable. All of my Win7 Group B home computers and laptops are just as stable, yet this is because I have been very careful to avoid installing some specific and known bad updates which Microsoft started to release way back in 2015.

    • #200292 Reply

      geekdom
      AskWoody Plus

      I have a rather plain vanilla Windows 7 system. I figure I’ll just keep patching until something breaks.

      My computer is a wallflower. Really.

      Group G{ot backup} Win7Pro · x64 · SP1 · i3-3220 · TestBeta
      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #200452 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        Group G is the only way to go these days. One can no longer trust any updates from Microsoft to uninstall properly. How about last years’s infamous update in which Microsoft tried to block the new AMD Ryzen CPUs from receiving updates? That update killed Windows Update on my Win7 PCs which have Haswell I5 CPUs. I had to restore them from offline backups since uninstalling that update did not resolve the issue.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #200414 Reply

      anonymous

      Just upgraded my two computers for June with no problems noted:

      Windows 7 Pro x64  Realtek PCIe controller – KB4284826

      Windows 10 Pro x64 v1709  Intel Ethernet Connection (2)1219-V – KB4284819

      In retrospect, there has been very little problem with either of these 2 updates this month. Most of the discussion boards including this one talked mostly about windows 10 v1803 or other topics of conversation.

      Here’s hoping July is smooth sailing.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #200459 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        Same here. Yet before I updated my Win7 computers with the June update, I first manually searched my computers’ registries under CurrentControlSet — Enum for whatever the network persistent info key is called, just to make sure that I would not lose network connectivity after applying the June update.

        With regards to the upcoming July updates, who knows? Microsoft’s track record for reliable Windows updates is now in the sewer, thanks to Nadella. With Ballmer, Windows updates used to be quite reliable. With Sinofsky, reliable Windows updates began to sink into the gutter. I really didn’t think that it would get worse than that, yet Nadella proved me wrong. With Nadella, Windows updates have sunk below gutter level and into the sewer in terms of quality and reliability. Nadella should be proud of his remarkable accomplishment since, after all, Microsoft has decided that Windows is dead and that the Cloud is everything.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #200515 Reply

      StruldBrug
      AskWoody Lounger

      W7 Home x64 Realtek PCIe
      Updated Security Only and IE11 after doing a new image. All systems go and no problems.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #200538 Reply

      mbhelwig
      AskWoody Lounger

      2018-06-22 — TRIAL INSTALL OF KB 4284826

      This follows on from my original post —   #186338

      As I do not have a canary, and I have not updated any of my computers since December 2017 I decided to bite the bullet and use my main computer  as a guinea pig —

      Image backup of my computer done with Macrium Reflect

      BIOS updated from F7 to F10
      Programs, and Antivirus updates done.
      Installed KB 4284826 to see what would happen !!!!!!!

      Installed ok

      Using Inspectre program — saw that Meltdown problem was fixed but not Spectre
      Computer was slower than before update, so turned off Meltdown fix with InSpectre program — https://www.grc.com/inspectre.htm — this fixed the speed problem.

      The update put “sleep” and “hibernate” on  my shutdown menu and activated the hibernate function. I have never used either function before — so the update has modified my setup.
      I had to use the command prompt to turn the “hibernate” off and remove the 10Gb hidden file it created from the C: drive.

      “Sleep” was set to “never” but computer is still showing a greyed out “sleep” item on my shut down menu.

      All the Shares on my Server (Win Home Server 2011) appear to be working.
      Network is a Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller.

      FYI — to find out what all the hardware is in my computers I use Speccy — a little program  found here — https://www.ccleaner.com/speccy/download/portable

      Using computer for a few days to see what else pops out of the woodwork.

      Hope this helps.

      mbhelwig

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #200557 Reply

        GoneToPlaid
        AskWoody Plus

        Hello mbhelwig,

        Obviously you are a Win7 user on Group A. I am a Win7 user on Group B. Your notes are very interesting that the June Monthly Rollup additionally changed your computer’s Sleep and Hibernate settings. Is anyone else seeing this with the June Monthly Rollup?

        Instead, it could be that when you updated your BIOS, some default BIOS settings may have changed which affect the allowable types of suspend modes for your computer. I would have suggested that you do not update your BIOS since Intel is still working its mitigations for Meltdown and Spectre, and BranchScope. By updating your BIOS, you may have inadvertently installed Intel’s v1 version of their Meltdown and Spectre microcode. Intel’s v1 microcode has known issues which cause blue screens, and which can cause data corruption or loss of data.

        Who is your motherboard manufacturer, and what is your motherboard model? Alternatively, you can reply with a link for the page from which you downloaded your F10 BIOS update. Then I can download the F10 BIOS file and check it, in order to see if your computer is starting up and loading Intel’s flawed v1 microcode.

        Best regards,

        –GTP

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #200563 Reply

          mbhelwig
          AskWoody Lounger

          Motherboard is a Gigabyte GA-H87M-D3H (rev. 1.x). found here — https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/GA-H87M-D3H-rev-1x#ov

          The F10 bios is  found under support and is dated  2014-07-17 so it is not a recent one. I am using windows 7 pro 64bit OS

          mbhelwig

          • #200570 Reply

            GoneToPlaid
            AskWoody Plus

            I see that the F11 2015 BIOS update was simply for supporting upgrading to Win10. I suspect that this F11 update caused the Sleep and Hibernate settings to change in Windows.

            The F11 2015 BIOS update contains no Meltdown and Spectre microcode updates, as any Meltdown and Spectre BIOS updates for any motherboard BIOS were not released by any vendor until late January 2018. Your motherboard is way past Gigabyte’s support cycle, and will never receive any BIOS updates for Meltdown and Spectre.

            • #200575 Reply

              mbhelwig
              AskWoody Lounger

              I suspected as much — meltdown and Spectre I shall have to live with. I was more concerned about the unnamed network driver mentioned in the recent updates description — hence the image of the OS before starting any updates at all. I have 6 other computers to do — one at a time………..

              Thank you for your help.

              mbhelwig

            • #200608 Reply

              GoneToPlaid
              AskWoody Plus

              Hello mbhelwig,

              To make sure that you will not encounter network issues when updating the other computers with the June rollup, you can do the following.

              Open the registry and navigate to:

              HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Enum\PCI

              Once there, simply search for all keys called:

              SlotPersistentInfo

              If found, delete them, close the registry, and then install the June rollup.

              On another note, your GA-H87M-D3H uses an AMD Aptio 4 BIOS. So do my computers. When I am sure that Intel has produced their final microcode version to prevent Meltdown and Spectre, I will be creating modified BIOS flash files for my computers. The BIOS flash file will contain Intel’s microcode for preventing Meltdown and Spectre. I will be able to do the same for your GA-H87M-D3H. I am not anxious to do this in the immediate future — unless working Spectre attacks are discovered in the wild.

              Best regards,

              –GTP

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #200683 Reply

              mbhelwig
              AskWoody Lounger

              To make sure that you will not encounter network issues when updating the other computers with the June rollup, you can do the following.

              Open the registry and navigate to:

              HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Enum\PCI

              Once there, simply search for all keys called:

              SlotPersistentInfo

              If found, delete them, close the registry, and then install the June rollup.

              Thank you for your reply GPT.

              What does the Registry key “SlotPersistentInfo” do. I have not heard of it before at all.

              A search of my updated computer registry shows that it is not present. I will look tomorrow at the computers that I still have to update.

              The “sleep” and “hibernate” functions do not bother me as they were easily removed.

              mbhelwig

    • #200621 Reply

      Grond
      AskWoody Lounger

      Home-built Win 7 x-64 desktop.
      KB4284826 & MSRT were only Importants listed, both checked. Both installed quickly, no muss, no fuss. Hid the two July Previews (SMQR & .NET).
      And as noted earlier by @gonetoplaid, I also noticed a perceived (by the Mk. I Eyeball test, anyway) slight improvement in performance.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #200771 Reply

        OldBiddy
        AskWoody Lounger

        I was also only offered the June monthly security roll up and the MSRT and went ahead updated. So far no ill effects.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #200635 Reply

      alpha128
      AskWoody Lounger

      I installed the Win 7 x64 June Monthly Rollup (KB4284826) today without any issues.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #200665 Reply

      Anonymous

      Just installed KB4284826 without any issues:  Windows 7 Professional, 64 bit, SP1 – Group A.

      Whoppee! Don’t have to obsess until a few weeks more. 🙂

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #200667 Reply

      jaybee48
      AskWoody Plus

      Full article in Computerworld Woody on Windows. [See the full post at: Patch Alert: Here’s where we stand with the June patches]

      Re latest v1803 patch KB4284848 for Windows 10 Pro, this patch was “missing in action” from Windows Update until the machine was moved into the Semi-Annual Channel (Targeted) branch AND the feature update delay was set to 0 days.  (I usually leave my machine in the Semi-Annual Channel with deferral set to 365 days but needed to test this patch via Windows Update delivery).  This happened on two completely different PCs.

      When I checked yesterday, KB4284848 still hadn’t made it onto the WSUS server I maintain either.

    • #200727 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Plus

      Thank you for your reply GPT. What does the Registry key “SlotPersistentInfo” do. I have not heard of it before at all. A search of my updated computer registry shows that it is not present. I will look tomorrow at the computers that I still have to update. The “sleep” and “hibernate” functions do not bother me as they were easily removed.

      This is the registry key (one or more may exist under ENUM) for PCI networking which if present, could cause users to lose network connectivity after installing any of the March 2018 through June 2018 Monthly Rollups or Security-only Updates. Microsoft appears to have further tracked down the issue to a missing .INF file for third party software in relation to network cards. The entire issue is triggered if SlotPersistentInfo keys are present for real or virtual network cards, when the Windows update updates PCI.SYS to a newer version on the user’s computer.

      To make sure that you do not encounter the above issues, search for any SlotPersistentInfo keys under ENUM\PCI as I previously described, export up each key to a separate .REG file which you should conveniently save to the Desktop, and then delete the key. The odds are that you will not find any SlotPersistentInfo keys on your computers, unless you have installed third party virtualization software. Still, it is a good idea to check for this potential issue and nip it in the bud before you install the June 2018 update on your other computers.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #200972 Reply

        mbhelwig
        AskWoody Lounger

        To make sure that you do not encounter the above issues, search for any SlotPersistentInfo keys under ENUM\PCI as I previously described, export up each key to a separate .REG file which you should conveniently save to the Desktop, and then delete the key. The odds are that you will not find any SlotPersistentInfo keys on your computers, unless you have installed third party virtualization software.

        Thank you for your reply.

        I have checked all the computers that I am responsible for (6) and only one computer has “SlotPersistentInfo”entries in the Registry — three enteries in fact. What will happen to this computer if I remove these three entries from the Registry. Will it still function normally before I put the June update on, or do I have to apply the June update immediately. I am just being careful.

        I gather that the  removed “SlotPersistentInfo” entries do not have to be replaced after the June updates are applied.

        We have never used any virtual software on any of the computers, so that cannot explain why only one computer has these entries. I built and softwared up these computers myself, so I know what has been installed on them.

        mbhelwig

        mbhelwig

    • #200744 Reply

      DrBonzo
      AskWoody Lounger

      I updated 3 Win 7 computers last night with the June patches, all with no issues.

      All are Group B, so it was KB4284867 (Security Only) and KB4230450 (IE 11).

      The machines are:

      Win 7 Starter, 32 bit, Intel Atom cpu, and Atheros AR5895 Wireless Network Adapter

      Win 7 Pro sp1, 64 bit, Ivy Bridge (3rd generation) core i5 cpu, and Intel 82579 LM Gigabit Network Connection (it’s an Ethernet connection)

      Win 7 Pro sp1, 64 bit, Broadwell (5th generation) core i3 cpu, and Intel Dual Band Wireless AC 3160 network adapter.

      The last machine took about 10 minutes to reboot, which is quite long for it. But, to reiterate, all 3 machines work as they did before patching with no noticeable slowdown and no internet connection problems. And just to be clear, all 3 machines are now completely updated Group B style through the June patches.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #200773 Reply

      GoneToPlaid
      AskWoody Plus

      I updated 3 Win 7 computers last night with the June patches, all with no issues. All are Group B, so it was KB4284867 (Security Only) and KB4230450 (IE 11)…

      Same here and Group B, except that I did the identical thing on all of my Win7 home computers on 06/20/2018, yet only after I had performed backups of each computer’s C: OS partition in case anything went bad. I am now 11 days “in” on all four of my Win7 home computers with regards to testing of these updates, with no apparent issues. I really can’t believe it. In fact, and given the past two years of Windows Update Hell, I am rather shocked that I have not encountered any issues.

      Moreover, the issues which I have been experiencing, since around July or September 2017 with some really old XP programs crashing in ntdll.dll on my Win7 computers, either when closing opened files within the program or when closing the old program itself, have finally been fixed. At this point, I consider the June 2018 update for Windows 7 to be golden in terms of resolving several long standing issues, and in terms of somewhat improving the greatly degraded performance of the baked in Windows protection for Meltdown which Microsoft introduced, starting with the January 2018 updates.

      Note that Microsoft presently offers both Meltdown and Spectre protection, via Windows Updates to the OS software and via new CPU microcode which is loaded when the OS starts, ONLY for Windows 10. Note that Windows 7 and Windows 8x DO NOT, via Windows Updates, receive updated and OS loaded CPU microcode to prevent Spectre when these OS’s start, even though doing so is COMPLETELY within Microsoft’s ability to do so. It would appear that Microsoft is throwing Windows 7 and Windows 8x under the bus.

      Regarding Meltdown…

      Hopefully Microsoft’s June 2018 updates do a better job of preventing Meltdown, and with a bit less performance impact. Nevertheless, it would still be wise to update your graphics drivers to the latest version, and to update your web browsers to the latest versions, since these updates may also incorporate vendor protection against Meltdown within these types of products.

       

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #200788 Reply

      moonbear
      AskWoody Lounger

      Seeing as my area is being forecast to be in line for some very nasty weather over the next week and a half to 2 weeks, I decided to go ahead and update early. I haven’t an update cycle go this smoothly since the rollups were introduced. Everything was downloaded, installed and back to smooth sailing in about a half hour. Also as @gonetoplaid has mentioned, the June updates do seem to give some performance back (especially in regards to startup in my case).

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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