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  • Patch Lady – a slap in the face to Partners

    Posted on Susan Bradley Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Patch Lady – a slap in the face to Partners

    This topic contains 36 replies, has 20 voices, and was last updated by  MHCLV941 5 months ago.

    • Author
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    • #1869901 Reply

      Susan Bradley
      AskWoody MVP
    • #1869919 Reply

      GreatAndPowerfulTech
      AskWoody Plus

      The face slaps have been ongoing for years. First, physical media was eliminated some years back, while increasing the price by almost double at the same time. Now, this new “Action Pack” which removes more benefits that were originally designed to help others sell and support Microsoft. Microsoft used to treat partners as partners. Now, they treat them as a profit center.

      GreatAndPowerfulTech

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1869946 Reply

      PKCano
      Da Boss

      Microsoft is in the process of moving everything online under their control.
      Rent from Microsoft. Let Microsoft manage your computing.
      Eventually, there will be no Partners.

      8 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1869945 Reply

      anonymous

      Well I guess this shouldn’t be too surprising coming from a company that clearly doesn’t even value its own customers!

      There’s a real danger here.  Unfortunately, even with the proliferation of Apple and Android products offering alternatives to the consumer desktop/laptop market share, Microsoft is in a monopoly position with a majority of the computing world locked into the Windows/Office platform.  There are simply no realistically viable alternatives.  And even if there were, switching over would be a mammoth undertaking for even the smallest of businesses.

      When the wheels come flying off this wagon, there’s going to be one heck of a kablooey the world over.

      I wonder if there is any real world way in our free market system to preemptively stem the disaster before it happens?

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1870184 Reply

        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        There are simply no realistically viable alternatives

        Even Microsoft knows that Linux is a viable alternative :

        Linux usage on Microsoft Azure has now surpassed Windows.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1870452 Reply

        lurks about
        AskWoody Lounger

        Joe Christina is doing a series of videos on YouTube about ditching Adobe which at first glance does not seem relevant. Joe has compiled a list of software for photographers to use instead of Adobe and his list has software for Windows, Mac, and Linux. Often what people consider mission critical, OS specific software does have a viable alternative for many if not most users. In several cases the options will allow one to use another OS.

        Alienating customers at various levels is not a good long term strategy by any company. Often excellent options already exist but what is missing is the will to make the switch. But if you motivate your customers to start seriously looking they will often find they do have realistic options.

        • #1875230 Reply

          rc primak
          AskWoody_MVP

          Matching exact file types and image/video formats with Adobe products outputs is still an issue in Linux and FOSS products.

          -- rc primak

    • #1869976 Reply

      cptomes
      AskWoody Plus

      Well I guess this shouldn’t be too surprising coming from a company that clearly doesn’t even value its own customers!

      There’s a real danger here.  Unfortunately, even with the proliferation of Apple and Android products offering alternatives to the consumer desktop/laptop market share, Microsoft is in a monopoly position with a majority of the computing world locked into the Windows/Office platform.  There are simply no realistically viable alternatives.  And even if there were, switching over would be a mammoth undertaking for even the smallest of businesses.

      When the wheels come flying off this wagon, there’s going to be one heck of a kablooey the world over.

      I wonder if there is any real world way in our free market system to preemptively stem the disaster before it happens?

      “no viable alternatives” blatantly untrue as a blanket statement.

      If the industry you are in has a mission critical app that will only run on Windows, then this statement is true.

      Even in small/home business support my need for a winblows machine is minimal, and shrinking every year.  Most of our customers don’t buy Office they use OpenOffice or LibreOffice.  My hard drive data recovery and imaging happens from MacOS.  I use Microsoft Remote Desktop from my Mac.  Most of my business customers with Winblows servers only use them for file serving which might transition to a NAS of some kind running a port of open source (Linux) code.

      Since casual users primarily do email, web browsing, and light file creation/editing of documents and images there are plenty of low cost or free Linux or macOS options.  The days of Linux being a nerd-only-hard-to-maintain-os are long gone.

      The reason M$ has a “monopoly” is that managers and bean counters are ignorant of alternatives and unwilling to change.  It’s a matter of time until the current minions and henchmen filling the cubicles all over the world rise through the org charts and then you will see M$ market share dropping in free fall.  Very small segments of the computing industry may stay forever.  Exchange email server clusters in big enterprise environments.  But even if the three big employers near me stay M$ forever that’s about 50,000 seats.  In a world where every one of those seats represents at least one or two home computers, and the total population of the area is about 250,000.  That’s a lot of market share to lose and M$ is doing a fine job of alienating users, support businesses, and now partners.

      Keep driving customers away and jacking up prices and see how well that works out in the long run…

      Hey look! Another Feature Update!

      You mean I shouldn't click Check for Updates?

      Why does it keep saying "Something Happened"?

      3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1870101 Reply

        anonymous

        Actually, I see companies and instances slowly start to steer away from dependancies on Microsoft. They prefer control over their products, want to know what is in the code of software and OS’es and clearly defined support. Preferably not taken care of by some vague figure in India with basically no other knowledge than a database in front of his nose. Then there is the problem of privacy and the control that Microsoft wants to over all its types of users. It’s not for nothing that the EU is requiers open document file formats, for example. That means that the dependancy on Office is basically non-existing anymore. Microsoft became a typical  huge company with a big mouth and know-it-all-better mentality. That’s backfiring now. Telltale sign is the huge amount of Windows 7 users that despite heavy pushing still didn’t move to 10. Big chance that a large percentage never will do so. And if you DESPERATELY want to use Office, there is also the option of setting up one server with some VM’s running Windows + Office for the workplaces that for whatever reason can’t do without.

        I am quite sure though that no sane company is developing stuff especially for Windows, Office etc. anymore. Nowadays, you take care of your software running in a browser. That can be a database, but also a spreadsheet or word processor. In 9 out of 10 times workers only type standard letters, fill in standard company forms, work with standard company spreadsheets etc. When those are transferred to some server/cloudbased service, no one needs Microsoft anymore. Not for their desktop-software at least. It’s the future and I see the transition happen all around me. In the past I used Office daily, nowadays at max a couple of times per month for some legacy-stuff. For the rest I work on some web-based app in a browser. And in 99% those apps are developped in and running on open source backends. Managed by either the company IT department or by a hired external company. Who needs the unreliability and unpredictability of a moloch of the past?

        Microsoft one day soon will become the next IBM. They will not dissapear, but focus on offering cloud services. They can and will be successfull with that if they don’t irritate existing customers so much as they do now. Too many negative experiences will spell a difficult road ahead for them (more than enough competitors in that area, after all). They should just accept that the still existing Windows/Office-users are not the typical users from the past anymore. Most of them are not interested in the latest and greatest gimmicks anymore, yet another transparancy-effect and stupid crashing store-apps. They just need a platform to run their software under their control and under their conditions. It’s totally useless to keep pushing upgrades whole the time. Just patch bugs, leaks and security stuff. And leave it all alone for some years, give people rest. If they don’t do that, it’ll end up in a big mess, much bigger then it already is. Probably January 2020 is the defining moment for their ecosystem…

         

      • #1870104 Reply

        anonymous

        The whole playfield is changing. If you really think about it, even at home things start to be more and more centralized. You mentioned the NAS already, many can install web-based software, sometimes including complete Office suites and much more. All running in a browser, accessible from a pc, Chromebook, tablet, smart-tv etc. No averagely intelligent person would store important files on a pc or notebook. The October-fiasco of Windows 10 update last year was a wake-up call for many people. In fact, you could glue a Raspberry Pi 4 on a screen and combined with some NAS- or server based webapps you’re in business. That already works perfectly well for more and more home users. Companies are catching up quickly. Microsoft for some weird reason clenches on Windows and wants to bring that under their total control. That ain’t gonna work, the aversion against that is growing by the day. Add to that a heavy dose of ignorance and disrespect to customers, plus a rude way of non-communication and every other business would be bankrupt within a year. It’s not for nothing that more and more governments – especially within the European Union – are more and more interested and restrictive on the monopolistic practices of not only Microsoft but als other monstreously large companies like Google and Facebook. If you care about your data and privacy as a company, as well as reliability and thrustworthyness you have to scratch your heads. What Microsoft did since the introduction of Windows 10 – and especially the last 1.5 year or so – is doubtfull business that is even against the law in more and more countries…

      • #1870337 Reply

        anonymous

        As for: “no viable alternatives” blatantly untrue as a blanket statement.

        That’s only true for users that simply use web browsers and a cross platform email client.  Unfortunately, this is rarely the case for businesses or advanced stand alone users.

        We’ve been looking for a direct MS Office alternative since Office 2007 appeared.  No product we’ve tested preserves formatting 100% of the time, but that’s something we could work around with simple changes.  Nearly impossible is preserving the many macro and programming components found in our multitude of documents, spreadsheets, and Access projects.  We’ve found few customers who can time and cost justify the work required to make this transition, train, and account for lost productivity while transitioning.

        Additionally, the application(s) specific to each individual business would need to be substituted, migrated, updated, or recoded to run on another platform.  The amount of time required, both in implementation and then again in retraining is substantial, as is usually the cost.  Again, this is something few businesses can justify.

        And lastly, there is the simple issue of software availability.  Many types of software just don’t exist on platforms other than Windows for quite a few applications and product categories.

        If starting from scratch, one may have the luxury of implementing a purely Linux or Apple based solution, but for those invested in the Windows infrastructure, change is a very expensive and possibly impossible proposition.

        For a good idea about the hurdles, take a look at Munich’s switch to Linux and their return to Windows.  Politics aside, it really boiled down to the real costs of switching and the lack of viable software.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #1870568 Reply

          anonymous

          It’s still untrue as a blanket statement that there are no viable alternatives. There are for many businesses. Yes, there is a cost associated with moving over, but that’s not the same thing as “no viable alternatives.” Increasingly software is being built to run in browser. Porting Windows software is easier than ever, with Wine and such. LibreOffice already is running Excel macros.  Access is being used less and less, with viable ways to convert to a better database system.

          The point is, Microsoft isn’t actually the only game in town anymore. While they will bring over a lot of people through inertia who can’t change, there are increasingly more people who can switch, and people have increasing reasons not to start using Microsoft in the first place.

          It seems foolish to make decisions that chase away customers when your competition is only getting stronger.

          • #1870577 Reply

            anonymous

            “The point is, Microsoft isn’t actually the only game in town anymore. While they will bring over a lot of people through inertia who can’t change, there are increasingly more people who can switch, and people have increasing reasons not to start using Microsoft in the first place.”

            Yes. People are correct to point out that existing systems can be deeply embedded in an MS ecosystem, and that does make it more difficult to change, but I often run into clients who are simply unaware that there are MS alternatives at all, and, just like every one of us here who serves sometimes as an advisor, I’m the guy they’re asking, Where once I would have said, “MS is not an ideal partner, but practically there’s no alternative, I several years ago began to mention viable, better, and cheaper alternatives to many individual products, and more recently even began, in some situations broaching the ideas of alternative OSs depending on circumstances. For instance, an environment can have MS servers in some positions but no longer do all servers in an environment have to be MS. Encouraging the people who make recommendations to clients to think about vendors other than MS is a foolish business strategy.

    • #1870048 Reply

      gkarasik
      AskWoody Plus

      Tech companies are unique in that 100% of their sales are driven by individual customers. You might argue that large corporations make up most of MS’s sales, but I would counter that all those corporations’ technology-buying decisions are made by geeks embedded somewhere in those organizations. And those large-corporate sales make up only part of MS’s overall sales. The rest comprise small and medium businesses whose tech-purchase decisions also are made by geeks. Alienate those geeks and eventually the source of MS’s sales will evaporate. If you doubt this thesis, research the history of Blackberry. Once preeminent in messaging devices, they decided they could afford to concentrate on large corporate sales and shuck support for individual geeks, overlooking the fact that every single one of those corporate sales was driven by a geek who owned a Blackberry. Blackberry quickly lost their dominance and will never regain it. It will take longer for this to happen to MS just because of inertia–it’s far larger than Blackberry ever was even at its height–but with these latest changes to alienate the rest of their captive geeks (they’ve been actively eliminating segments of their loyal geek population for years) it’s now become inevitable.

      GaryK

      • #1870455 Reply

        lurks about
        AskWoody Lounger

        When it is obvious to non-Geeks that they have options other than Windows MS has to become more customer focused rather than less. When I wonder into Best Buys I see a large amount sales space devoted to Chromebooks and Macs along with Windows. First display space reflects on sales which means Best Buys is seeing good Chromebook and Mac sales to someone. Also, MS is relying to much on customer inertia that they will always buy Windows. That is very dangerous as most of their customers use 2 OSes or more on a regular basis (their phone and computer). So the customers are not perturbed about learning or using another OS if necessary. To keep these customers and their informal IT department happy should be a major goal of MS so they do not wonder away.

        The direction MS is headed to be like IBM if they are do not s***w up too bad or end up like Wang or DEC if they really s***w up. IBM seems to suffering a lingering death while Wang and DEC was much more sudden.

      • #1870823 Reply

        Lugh
        AskWoody_MVP

        corporations’ technology-buying decisions are made by geeks embedded somewhere in those organizations

        I doubt that’s widespread these days. So many large companies got severely burned in the 80s & 90s by leaving tech decisions to IT, it didn’t take long to realize that information and communication were far too important to leave under IT control.

        Any company which regards tech as an end in itself—ie to be controlled by the tech people working it—won’t last long in today’s competitive environment.

        Lugh.
        ~
        Alienware Aurora R6; Win10 Home x64 1803; Office 365 x32
        i7-7700; GeForce GTX 1060; 16GB DDR4 2400; 1TB SSD, 256GB SSD, 4TB HD

      • #1870856 Reply

        anonymous

        GaryK,

        While I do understand and appreciate your point about geeks driving most corporate tech buying decisions…

        never underestimate the willingness of a change-averse “important executive” who “knows about software and stuff” and “uses computers a lot” to “make a hard business decision” to override the well-informed and well-considered recommendations of the techies.

        🙁

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1870460 Reply

      EspressoWillie
      AskWoody Plus

      After reading many of the comments, I had to add my two cents.

      I fall into the small business category and am a MS partner.  I use the internal licensing to test our applications on a variety of platforms.  Our clients are finacial institutions, health care, etc. and they all use Windows and MS Office.  This change would hurt us directly.

      The arguement of “no viable alternatives” being false only applies if you have complete control of your environment.  When you depend on clients, they dictate what environment you have.

      So for us small businesses that sell and consult, let’s hope MS will backtrack on this.

      Cheers!!
      Willie McClure
      www.datarim.com
      Talk's cheap, takes money to buy whiskey.
      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1870499 Reply

      anonymous

      Eventually, everything will be back to the mainframe-terminal model; “P”ersonal “C”ontrol will be gone. “The NET is the computer.”–remember who said that?

    • #1870550 Reply

      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      After reading many of the comments, I had to add my two cents.

      I fall into the small business category and am a MS partner.  I use the internal licensing to test our applications on a variety of platforms.  Our clients are finacial institutions, health care, etc. and they all use Windows and MS Office.  This change would hurt us directly.

      The arguement of “no viable alternatives” being false only applies if you have complete control of your environment.  When you depend on clients, they dictate what environment you have.

      So for us small businesses that sell and consult, let’s hope MS will backtrack on this.

      “When you depend on clients, they dictate what environment you have.”  Let me add, the client’s clients also have a hand in dictating that environment.

      How very true.  Those who blissfully suggest it easy to wander off into the lands of Linux, Libre/Open Office, Apple (running what software?) ignore the fact almost no company has a clean sheet of paper from which to start.  Any of these alternatives would likely be fine IF starting from scratch and IF one could find the expertise and IF the company operated in a vacuum.

      I have a client who wanted to avoid Office in the worst way and actually has LibreOffice installed on some of its computers.  However, the client had to purchase some Office 365 seats in order to handle the files send by its clients.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1870610 Reply

        anonymous

        But SOME Office seats is already a huge improvements in comparison with only. And also, Office doesn’t necessarily mean Windows. I work with some employees who demand I deliver stuff in Office-formats because of some ancient templates they stubbornly keep using. Works fine with office 365 on a Mac.

    • #1870574 Reply

      F A Kramer
      AskWoody Plus

      Microsoft had best not rely on me as a source of income for much longer. I am retired. While employed, I used Word frequently and at length every day, now perhaps a letter once a week or less. I used Excel for a gradebook, financial records, banking, etc., but now again once a week or less. Outlook I still use daily for the email and calendar functions, but even that is becoming less important. Nearly all of what I want to do I can do on my Samsung tablet. I doubt that I will ever purchase another desktop computer (even I am a bit surprised by how soon that has become the case) and my laptop is just a larger screen version of what I can do on the Tablet. Which of these three “computers” do I use many times a day? Do I even need to ask.

      The bottom line…. Microsoft will have one fewer customer in another year or so. And I am guessing that my experience is the same as many, many other “non-business” users. In a way it does not matter whether or not Microsoft treats me with contempt, or that Microsoft thinks that it knows best what I should do with my computer(s) and how I should do it. Microsoft is becoming irrelevant in my world.

      = Ax Kramer

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1870695 Reply

      UncleRemus83
      AskWoody Lounger

      Microsoft is in the process of moving everything online under their control.
      Rent from Microsoft. Let Microsoft manage your computing.
      Eventually, there will be no Partners.

      Bingo.  I raised this same alarm to some partners who were enthusiastically trying to sell me on Office 365 back when it was just starting to get the hard push from Microsoft.  I told them they were selling their own funerals because, with this business model, who needs the partners?

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1870833 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss
    • #1870882 Reply

      gkarasik
      AskWoody Plus

      GaryK,

      While I do understand and appreciate your point about geeks driving most corporate tech buying decisions…

      never underestimate the willingness of a change-averse “important executive” who “knows about software and stuff” and “uses computers a lot” to “make a hard business decision” to override the well-informed and well-considered recommendations of the techies.

      🙁

      Yes, you’re right. We’ve all faced those, and they’ve all made decisions we then live with. My larger point is that the foundation of MS’s business has been us recommending MS software. MS is eroding its own foundation. They probably think, if they’ve bothered to articulate it to themselves, that techs are no longer important to their business model because the execs you’re describing are making the decisions. I believe they’re wrong, and that MS in 10 years will no longer be the dominant force it is today. Regardless of their policies, that may be inevitable anyway. We’ll have to wait and see. Why don’t we meet back right here 10 years from today and have a glass of apple cider and see where things are at?

      GaryK

    • #1870973 Reply

      td97402
      AskWoody Lounger

      Microsoft is in the process of moving everything online under their control.
      Rent from Microsoft. Let Microsoft manage your computing.
      Eventually, there will be no Partners.

      Bingo.  I raised this same alarm to some partners who were enthusiastically trying to sell me on Office 365 back when it was just starting to get the hard push from Microsoft.  I told them they were selling their own funerals because, with this business model, who needs the partners?

      My experience is that my clients still depend on me even after the transition to Office 365 applications and hosted Exchange email just as much as when they had an in house Exchange Server and perpetual licensed Office.  I might lose a bit of income in that I don’t get to sell and install a new version of Office every 5 years or so.  It’s not really that big a deal as I am upgrading their hardware and reinstalling their subscription products every 5 years or so anyway.

      I am unhappy about the loss of IUR but with Action Pack renewals at $500 a year these days I can see where I will just subscribe to a few Office 365 seats and buy Server 2019 Essentials.  I might actually save money as I am not likely to continue with Action Pack.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1871155 Reply

      Elly
      AskWoody MVP

      For people who have heavily invested their time, energy, and money into proprietary systems like Microsoft and Windows, it can come as a great disappointment that Microsoft has been morphing their software to act more and more like mal-ware. Proprietary software gives itself rights that shift the power balance from our hands (end users) to their hands, so that we are relying on their good will to provide something acceptable for us. People don’t like what Microsoft did to sneak W10 onto their computers in the first place, but then buy a new system, trusting that Microsoft will not continue to assert their control and power over the new system, despite the fact that the behaviors that are found obnoxious and abusive are being more blatantly installed.

      At some point one has to stop volunteering to give one’s own power up. Does your computer work for you, or for Microsoft? People who use open source operating systems are choosing to look at the long term, retain their power over their hardware, and can assert their power to accept, reject, or change what is available to them. Where power is not balanced, opportunities for abuse arise. It would be important to see what rights Microsoft partners had identified in their contracts. Apparently, just like individual end users, their only choice is to pay up, or quit.

      It might be far more valuable to invest in non-proprietary software in the long run, rather than looking forward to continued power imbalance and abuse… more than simple cost analysis might indicate.

      Maybe I’m inspired by the celebration of the 4th of July, here in the US… but there are generations of those that have given their lives, for freedom… and there are too many people who are ready to sign away rights in order to do things faster, or over the internet, or because it is the latest new thing. Its harder for me to learn a new operating system… but really important, now that Microsoft has proven to be less than a benign tyrant, flexing its power over us, to look at what we do have choice about. Making the choice for myself, and my family, we are going to choose what does not restrict my choice, undermine my control, and use consumer/ad friendly terms for spyware. Free.

      Microsoft partners are seeing why choosing a proprietary system may not benefit them in the long run. It can be an expensive lesson.

      We can turn a blind eye, or see what the lesson is, and learn from it.

      Win 7 Home, 64 bit, Group B

      6 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1871571 Reply

      cptomes
      AskWoody Plus

      As for: “no viable alternatives” blatantly untrue as a blanket statement.

      That’s only true for users that simply use web browsers and a cross platform email client.  Unfortunately, this is rarely the case for businesses or advanced stand alone users.

      We’ve been looking for a direct MS Office alternative since Office 2007 appeared.  No product we’ve tested preserves formatting 100% of the time, but that’s something we could work around with simple changes.  Nearly impossible is preserving the many macro and programming components found in our multitude of documents, spreadsheets, and Access projects.  We’ve found few customers who can time and cost justify the work required to make this transition, train, and account for lost productivity while transitioning.

      Additionally, the application(s) specific to each individual business would need to be substituted, migrated, updated, or recoded to run on another platform.  The amount of time required, both in implementation and then again in retraining is substantial, as is usually the cost.  Again, this is something few businesses can justify.

      And lastly, there is the simple issue of software availability.  Many types of software just don’t exist on platforms other than Windows for quite a few applications and product categories.

      If starting from scratch, one may have the luxury of implementing a purely Linux or Apple based solution, but for those invested in the Windows infrastructure, change is a very expensive and possibly impossible proposition.

      For a good idea about the hurdles, take a look at Munich’s switch to Linux and their return to Windows.  Politics aside, it really boiled down to the real costs of switching and the lack of viable software.

      Blind acceptance and usage of a proprietary software deliberately engineered to force users to continue to buy buggy and proprietary software isn’t a viable path to successful future.  Blame lies equally with m$ and the lemmings who followed them over the cliff with Excel macros and proprietary formats.  Pay now or pay more later to escape.

      Hey look! Another Feature Update!

      You mean I shouldn't click Check for Updates?

      Why does it keep saying "Something Happened"?

    • #1871644 Reply

      cptomes
      AskWoody Plus

      After reading many of the comments, I had to add my two cents.

      I fall into the small business category and am a MS partner.  I use the internal licensing to test our applications on a variety of platforms.  Our clients are finacial institutions, health care, etc. and they all use Windows and MS Office.  This change would hurt us directly.

      The arguement of “no viable alternatives” being false only applies if you have complete control of your environment.  When you depend on clients, they dictate what environment you have.

      So for us small businesses that sell and consult, let’s hope MS will backtrack on this.

      “When you depend on clients, they dictate what environment you have.”  Let me add, the client’s clients also have a hand in dictating that environment.

      How very true.  Those who blissfully suggest it easy to wander off into the lands of Linux, Libre/Open Office, Apple (running what software?) ignore the fact almost no company has a clean sheet of paper from which to start.  Any of these alternatives would likely be fine IF starting from scratch and IF one could find the expertise and IF the company operated in a vacuum.

      I have a client who wanted to avoid Office in the worst way and actually has LibreOffice installed on some of its computers.  However, the client had to purchase some Office 365 seats in order to handle the files send by its clients.

      Quickbooks has macOs native version.

      M$ themselves have macOS native Office.

      Browsers are not OS specific any more, M$ lost that lawsuit.

      M$ is seeing the light and is making it possible to install and run apps compiled for *nix os under Windows.

      For DECADES everyone (big enterprise, small/medium business, home users) have distrusted M$ to publish a version of Windows that’s stable right out of the gate.  Shoving “feature updates” down everyone’s throats every 6 months isn’t a solution.  Fixing your relationship with customers is the solution.

      Several of my customers still use XP based apps running in vm.  Those vm DO NOT have to be hosted on systems running M$ os.  It’s a matter of time until more and more business owners realize they can just virtualize an existing system and run it on a different os host system.

      M$ publishes Remote Desktop for macOS.

      There are probably more examples but I’m not interested in beating the drum that hard in a room full of M$ apologists.

      If you don’t see the freight train coming down the tracks it’s not my problem.

      Hey look! Another Feature Update!

      You mean I shouldn't click Check for Updates?

      Why does it keep saying "Something Happened"?

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1871726 Reply

        jabeattyauditor
        AskWoody Lounger

        If you don’t see the freight train coming down the tracks it’s not my problem.

        Your failure to understand the perspectives of others could be a problem not only for you, but also for your clients – and not everyone who uses/sells/supports Microsoft products is a “M$ apologist.”

        Conversely, not everyone who knows & supports Linux believes it’s the best tool for every shop. Ubuntu, Mint, and Gentoo have all had distribution compromises and/or backdoors in the not-so-distant past; just because the OS has an “L” or a “U” in its name doesn’t mean that everything is perfect.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #1871831 Reply

          cptomes
          AskWoody Plus

          If you don’t see the freight train coming down the tracks it’s not my problem.

          Your failure to understand the perspectives of others could be a problem not only for you, but also for your clients – and not everyone who uses/sells/supports Microsoft products is a “M$ apologist.”

          Conversely, not everyone who knows & supports Linux believes it’s the best tool for every shop. Ubuntu, Mint, and Gentoo have all had distribution compromises and/or backdoors in the not-so-distant past; just because the OS has an “L” or a “U” in its name doesn’t mean that everything is perfect.

          I do understand the perspectives of others.  I just think they are stuck in the old paradigm of “must be descended from NT4” and refuse to open their eyes to the future.  Continuing to do “what we’ve always done” with M$ is just prolonging the pain.  Week after week there are more and bigger data breaches and when you dig down in them it’s a M$ vulnerability at the root.  Linux isn’t the answer.  macOS isn’t the answer.  I’m pretty sure “let’s install the latest M$ os” isn’t the answer either.  maybe a more discriminating attitude towards what is necessary vs what is convenient is the answer.  for some, M$ os is necessary.  but my assertion is that now, and growing into the future, more and more people and organizations will find that M$ is NOT necessary and in fact is both more expensive and less workable.  at this point in time the alternatives to a M$ os are more viable than at any time in the past and the future continues that trend.  ignore that and keep installing M$ products as a knee jerk reaction and you’re going to get run over by the freight train.

           

          Hey look! Another Feature Update!

          You mean I shouldn't click Check for Updates?

          Why does it keep saying "Something Happened"?

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1874320 Reply

      b
      AskWoody Plus

      U-turn:

      Given your feedback, we have made the decision to roll back all planned changes related to internal use rights and competency timelines that were announced earlier this month. This means you will experience no material changes this coming fiscal year, and you will not be subject to reduced IUR licenses or increased costs related to those licenses next July as previously announced.

      We listened to you, and we have acted.

      Updates to program change announcements

      Microsoft capitulates and agrees to undo planned partner product-licensing changes

      Windows 10 Pro Version 1909 (Group ASAP)

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1875244 Reply

        rc primak
        AskWoody_MVP

        So, saved for another year. Then the whole thing can come roaring back just the same way. Am I missing something here?

        -- rc primak

    • #1875066 Reply

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      We’ve been looking for a direct MS Office alternative since Office 2007 appeared.  No product we’ve tested preserves formatting 100% of the time, but that’s something we could work around with simple changes.  Nearly impossible is preserving the many macro and programming components found in our multitude of documents, spreadsheets, and Access projects.

      Then again not even MS Office preserves everything, between versions. And that’s not getting into updates that change how the macro and programming parts work (security updates for exactly those in particular)…

      Unannounced changes between Click-to-Run versions of MS Office aren’t particularly enjoyable. Volume-licensed versions being much more expensive was still tolerated with the greater stability there but since we’re not getting that any more either… (Have sold some 2019 volume licenses. They were to get downgrade rights to the 2016 msi version.)

      Conversely, not everyone who knows & supports Linux believes it’s the best tool for every shop. Ubuntu, Mint, and Gentoo have all had distribution compromises and/or backdoors in the not-so-distant past; just because the OS has an “L” or a “U” in its name doesn’t mean that everything is perfect.

      Exactly.

      Sometimes the best tool for the job is very different. Might be VxWorks, might be QNX, might be OpenBSD… might be z/OS, might be Android.

      My experience is that my clients still depend on me even after the transition to Office 365 applications and hosted Exchange email just as much as when they had an in house Exchange Server and perpetual licensed Office.

      Hah, I wouldn’t be surprised if they asked for help more… because I do get calls about Click-to-Run Office applications looking different from last week whenever MS pushes a large update, even if nothing actually breaks. (And often something does, and then some of the users feel insecure about buttons being arranged differently on screen, so workflow disruptions…) And that’s not getting into 365 Exchange or other service-side changes.

    • #1875279 Reply

      cptomes
      AskWoody Plus

      So, saved for another year. Then the whole thing can come roaring back just the same way. Am I missing something here?

      that’s exactly what I see.

      maybe more than a year.  they’ll market it differently.  make it look like a new service they will offer.

      Hey look! Another Feature Update!

      You mean I shouldn't click Check for Updates?

      Why does it keep saying "Something Happened"?

    • #1875567 Reply

      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      MS has reversed course and will not cancel the licenses or the support incidents.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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