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  • Patch Lady – for those keeping track

    Posted on Susan Bradley Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Patch Lady – for those keeping track

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    This topic contains 48 replies, has 24 voices, and was last updated by  Ascaris 1 week, 2 days ago.

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    • #1900484 Reply

      Susan Bradley
      AskWoody MVP

      My infamous Acer 32 gig max hard drive got 1903 offered up to it.  I did not attach an external USB hard drive, rather I left the internal drive and t
      [See the full post at: Patch Lady – for those keeping track]

      Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      8 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1900490 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      … and if I recall, you bought this beast fairly recently.

      • #1900516 Reply

        Susan Bradley
        AskWoody MVP

        March of 2018 to be exact.  It was shipped with 10, not upgraded to 10.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #1900538 Reply

          woody
          Da Boss

          Less than 18 months ago.

          That doesn’t bode well for current cheap Windows machines, either.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1900500 Reply

      GreatAndPowerfulTech
      AskWoody Lounger

      Microsoft has, on occasion, made some pitiful decisions after OEM’s came a cryin’, begging them to lower their already low hardware standards. Of course, they complied. Vista on a single core CPU with only 512-MB of RAM was an abomination. Putting Windows on a 32-GB drive is absolute insanity, and shows no forward thinking put into the original decision at all. Microsoft should pay to have 64-GB drive installed to replace the 32-GB one.

      GreatAndPowerfulTech

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1900579 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody_MVP

        32GB SSD should not be allowed as the only internal drive. The hardware vendor should be required to put a warning label prominently on the laptop which states 32GB is barely enough to crawl through normal operation. A similar, but not so severe, warning should be affixed to 64GB SSD machines. A Windows machine should have a minimum of a 128GB SSD in order not to have to affix a warning label.

        The one saving grace with a 64GB SSD machine is that you can plug in an SD card to provide more space. Not a great solution, but at least it will make the machine usable.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
        • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 2 days ago by  MrJimPhelps.
        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #1904176 Reply

          carpintero
          AskWoody Lounger

          Implies that it is not so with non-SSD machine.  True?

      • #1900728 Reply

        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Microsoft should pay to have 64-GB drive installed to replace the 32-GB one

        64GB is not enough as Windows OS requires ~20GB, Windows.OLD another 20-30GB, sleep+hibernation ~10GB, Microsoft’s new temp folder ~7GB… Minimum space required should be 128GB.

        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #1901050 Reply

          MrJimPhelps
          AskWoody_MVP

          …plus any installed software.

          You could turn off sleep/hibernation – I always do. That should provide just enough space for usability with a 64GB drive (if you aren’t planning on installing very much software). You could delete the Windows.OLD folders. And you could use a big SD card as the overflow drive for Windows updates.

          It’s ridiculous to have to do all of that just because they were unethical enough to sell you a computer with such a small internal drive. A regular user won’t know about all of the hoops they have to jump through to make it work. You shouldn’t have to be an IT professional to be able to use Windows 10 on your laptop.

          Group "L" (Linux Mint)
          with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #1901495 Reply

          GreatAndPowerfulTech
          AskWoody Lounger

          Microsoft should pay to have 64-GB drive installed to replace the 32-GB one

          64GB is not enough as Windows OS requires ~20GB, Windows.OLD another 20-30GB, sleep+hibernation ~10GB, Microsoft’s new temp folder ~7GB… Minimum space required should be 128GB.

          ~120-GB would be ideal. However, since Microsoft is unlikely to even admit their mistake, I doubt they’ll pay for any drive capacity upgrade.

          GreatAndPowerfulTech

          • #1904191 Reply

            EP
            AskWoody_MVP

            assuming that the commonly used 64bit versions (X64, ARM64) of Windows 10 would be installed on there. the lesser known 32bit/x86 version of Windows 10 takes up less space (well below 100 gigs)

    • #1900506 Reply

      anonymous

      Maybe if Windows wasn’t such a bloated beast, 32 GB would be fine. It’s getting bigger and bigger every year. My Windows 10 install takes 23 GB with updates not including installers and package cache. If you include all things MS on my system it’s around 35 GB. Compare that with my Debian xfce install of 4.8 GB that can do all the same office tasks and more.

      The problem is mainly from Microsoft’s policy on backward compatibility and updates. It’s great that I can run almost any Windows application from the past 20+ years but it’s also causing all the update headaches and bloat.

      The NT kernels life span(1993-now) is longer than that of MS-DOS(1981-2000). MS has stagnated on creating a newer New Technology(NT) but something needs to be done to bring PC computing into the present. They could have the best of both worlds, borrowing from Linux, Chrome OS and OSX to create a fast stable and secure system while leveraging virtualization technology to have backwards compatibility for those who need it. Who knows how many dedicated Windows users they would alienate in the process though.

      We seem to be in the middle of the Windows dark ages and I’m looking forward to a time when we can say goodbye to all the headaches that surround our computers.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #1900591 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody_MVP

        If Microsoft gets rid of backward compatibility, you will have riots in the streets. Anytime they plug one of these compatibility “holes” in order to make Windows more secure, everybody screams that the latest version of Windows 10 broke someone’s ancient application.

        A recent example: SMB v.1 is an old and supposedly insecure protocol for accessing a network drive. It is turned off by default in Windows 10-1809. (It is very easy to turn it back on – go to Windows Features and check the box.) Everybody was screaming that 1809 broke network access! The only reason it broke network access was because so many networks are still running the ancient and insecure SMB v.1! The thanks Microsoft got for trying to plug that hole was all manner of accusations of wrongdoing.

        We are truly spoiled by the huge amount of resources Microsoft has invested in keeping Windows as backward-compatible as possible. When they eliminate one aspect of the backward-compatibility in order to make a needed improvement, it forces people to move forward, and that’s what people don’t like.

        My only fault with Microsoft is that perhaps they don’t do enough to make these things well-known; if they would do more along those lines, more people would know what to do to deal with these things when they happen.

        Still want to run that ancient program? I have a friend who uses an old Greek and Hebrew program for studying the Bible. He didn’t want to have to buy a newer version, so I installed Oracle VirtualBox on his Windows 8.1 computer, installed Windows 2000 in a virtual machine, and like magic his ancient software works as good as new on his brand new Windows 8.1 computer. In other words, there are usually ways to keep using the old stuff, if you really want or need to.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #1900916 Reply

          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          Thank you. Backward compatibility is needed, as you stated. For example if I migrated some PCs manually from 1709 to 1809 with SMB v1 enabled, Windows update kept my setting. On the other hand, new machines distributed with 1809 have SMB v1 disabled as default. Also I have one machine with W10 32bit for running 16bit app from 1999 🙂 It was quite complicated to install 32 bit Win on system with UEFI… Argh.
          But.. At least litlle experienced user should be able to “repair this issue”.
          I find the biggest problem with stability and driver issues. There is lot of going on in the background, that you have absolutely no control of. Fresh install is more than 20 GB. I think W10 is heading towards uncertain future. Please notice when reinstalling driver, that there is still default location A:\ Why?

          There are ancient parts of OS. It is most unwise to have nice graphical interface instead of stable system. Foolish move and no responsibility. Greed, greed, greed.. more money please!

          I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.
          --- Thomas A. Edison

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1901054 Reply

        mn–
        AskWoody Lounger

        The problem is mainly from Microsoft’s policy on backward compatibility and updates. It’s great that I can run almost any Windows application from the past 20+ years but it’s also causing all the update headaches and bloat.

        It’s not *required* to cause all that much bloat if that were done reasonably.
        I’m told Xinuos OpenServer 5 Definitive 2018 can still run MS Xenix applications from way back in the 80s…

        Now, optional cross- and backwards-compatibility support as optional virtualization libraries… hm, yeah, I’ve seen that before. All you need is a robust hypervisor and…

      • #1902166 Reply

        rc primak
        AskWoody_MVP

        They could have the best of both worlds, borrowing from Linux, Chrome OS and OSX to create a fast stable and secure system while leveraging virtualization technology to have backwards compatibility for those who need it.

        When I hear talk of Microsoft (or Google or Amazon) “borrowing” from open-source, I cringe. Remember the Three E’s of Microsoft “borrowing”:

        Embrace, Extend, Extinguish! 

        “Embrace, extend, and extinguish”,[1] (EEE) also known as “embrace, extend, and exterminate”,[2] is a phrase that the U.S. Department of Justice found[3] was used internally by Microsoft[4] to describe its strategy for entering product categories involving widely used standards, extending those standards with proprietary capabilities, and then using those differences to strongly disadvantage its competitors.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embrace,_extend,_and_extinguish

         

        -- rc primak

        • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by  rc primak.
        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #1900659 Reply

      Fred
      AskWoody Lounger

      My infamous Acer 32 gig max hard drive got 1903 offered up to it.  I did not attach an external USB hard drive, rather I left the internal drive and t
      [See the full post at: Patch Lady – for those keeping track]

      ehhh, message is “clear”:  All consumers must buy new hardware every 12 months.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1901057 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody_MVP

        …or wipe the drive and install Linux! These dinky underpowered (and inexpensive) Windows 10 machines might do just fine as Linux machines.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
        3 users thanked author for this post.
        • #1901095 Reply

          anonymous

          +1.  Yes indeed.  I converted an under-powered Win10 machine (originally a Win7) to Linux Mint Cinnamon with Wine, and it’s great. 

          And it runs 16-bit Windows applications straight off (which Win7 would only do if pushed — installing XPM — and Win10 apparently wouldn’t do at all).

          One of my very old 16-bit apps is a (home-brew) emulator to run CPM2.2 applications in 16-bit MS-DOS.  So just as a demo (there is no real need for this gadget nowadays) I did once produce a screenshot of Wordstar 8-bit, thinking it is running on an 8080 processor in CPM, actually running in an emulator within what the emulator thinks is MS-DOS 3.1, but is actually  Linux Mint 64-bit.  Yee-hah.

          +1 HMcF.  Linux Mint Cinnamon 18, with Wine. (DosBox may be involved there somewhere as well.)

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #1903585 Reply

          Mark
          AskWoody Plus

          You two are giving me ideas as to what to do with my old Dell laptop.  I’m pretty sure it could run Win 10…but why?  I’ve got a newer Asus with Win 10 v1709 and it runs just fine.

          I’ve been wanting to give Linux a try, so maybe this is the opportunity to do so.

          Windows 10 Pro x64 v1709, Windows 7 Home Premium x64, Windows Vista Home Premium x64
          • #1904153 Reply

            anonymous

            I downloaded (and test-installed) the ISO images for both Mint Cinnamon and Mint XFCE.  I preferred the look-and-feel of the Cinnamon desktop, so I went with that.

            I also sometimes come across (I think it’s) Debian, in stand-alone bootable tools like Clonezilla and Gparted.  I still prefer the combination which I took, for my routine use.

            Good luck.
            HMcF

            MVP Edit: Please keep on topic, thank you.

    • #1900726 Reply

      Alex5723
      AskWoody Plus

      So I let it go for it… and….. and…. and…

      Once again once it kicked a reboot it gave the message that it couldn’t find the mounted drive and would not finish the upgrade to 1903.

      Dear Microsoft, you should have trained your AI to check for free space, compatible HW drivers… use installed drivers instead of replacing drivers…

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1901136 Reply

      plodr
      AskWoody Plus

      32GB is fine for an android phone or tablet and linux but not Windows 10.

      I’m reading posts in forums with folks having the same issue Susan is facing. If the update is next to impossible and it is for a “normal” user, then the people won’t update to another version.

      MS only offers support/patches for the flavors of Windows 10 Home and Pro for 18 months. How many unpatched Windows 10 computers will be out there surfing the net?

       

       

      Got coffee?

      • #1901155 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody_MVP

        In Microsoft’s defense, I understand that they do prompt the user to insert an SD card whenever there isn’t enough space to do an update. If this is true, then the user will be able to continue hobbling along with their woefully underpowered Windows 10 laptop.

        Group "L" (Linux Mint)
        with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
        • #1901163 Reply

          Susan Bradley
          AskWoody MVP

          It HAS a SD card in there.  It still barfs.

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #1901165 Reply

            Susan Bradley
            AskWoody MVP

            Literally the only way I can get the machine to complete an update is by attaching an external USB hard drive.  SD cards do not work even though Windows 10 senses the SD card and acts like it should use it when it reboots it fails to remount the SD card and thus fails the upgrade process.

            Susan Bradley Patch Lady

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #1901201 Reply

              MrJimPhelps
              AskWoody_MVP

              A laptop should never require the user to attach an external drive in order to get it to work.

              Susan, you know a lot more about this stuff than most, and if it’s a hassle for you, it is unconscionably difficult for most. Perhaps a class-action lawsuit would end this unethical practice. I’m not sure what else would alert the regular folks not to buy this junk thinking that it will work.

              Group "L" (Linux Mint)
              with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
            • #1905405 Reply

              Ascaris
              AskWoody_MVP

              Microsoft didn’t force the OEMs to put Windows 10 on such an under-equipped device.  The blame for this should go to the hardware OEMs, not to Microsoft.  Granted, Windows is a massive OS as far as hard drive space is concerned, and if it were more space-efficient (like Linux), it could work, but it’s not.  That’s something that the OEMs know, and they decide to put Windows 10 on 32GB drives anyway.

               

              Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.16.4).

            • #1905425 Reply

              PKCano
              Da Boss

              I would have to put part of the blame on Microsoft, too, for publishing unreasonably small system requirementts for Win10:

              • Processor: 1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster processor or SoC.
              • RAM: 1 gigabyte (GB) for 32-bit or 2 GB for 64-bit.
              • Hard disk space: 16 GB for 32-bit OS 20 GB for 64-bit OS.
              • Graphics card: DirectX 9 or later with WDDM 1.0 driver.
              • Display: 800×600

              That’s not realistic.

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #1905442 Reply

              Microfix
              Da Boss

              Those specs equate to my (road warrior) 2010 acer netbook being capable to run W10. WOW! LOL
              Not a chance that Beacon OS is getting ANYWHERE near it.
              It too has 32Gb SSD and LXDE/XFCE hybrid install is only 5Gb and runs like a charm..go figure

              ********** Win7 x64/x86 | Win8.1 x64 | Linux Hybrids x64 **********

            • #1905443 Reply

              Ascaris
              AskWoody_MVP

              Ok, that’s a good point.  MS gets some of the blame too!

              Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.16.4).

            • #1901202 Reply

              MrJimPhelps
              AskWoody_MVP

              I appreciate your letting us know that the SD card doesn’t work. I have had a few moments of insanity lately, seriously considering buying a Surface Go for my daughter, thinking that I could simply put in a big SD card to get it to work.

              For a Windows 10 laptop, it will have to be 128GB internal drive or bigger. Nothing less will do.

              Group "L" (Linux Mint)
              with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
            • #1901205 Reply

              MrJimPhelps
              AskWoody_MVP

              @sb Susan, have you tried using an SD card USB adapter, which will treat the SD card like an external USB drive, or more likely, like a USB flash drive? Will that get you through the update process successfully? Or perhaps a standard USB flash drive is all you need.

              Group "L" (Linux Mint)
              with Windows 8.1 running in a VM
    • #1901156 Reply

      EP
      AskWoody_MVP

      what is the model number of that Acer computer w/ the 32Gb drive, Susan Bradley?

      It’s not only Microsoft’s fault but also Acer’s fault for making such a machine with paltry storage space.

      perhaps take up or mention the storage problem in the Acer community forums:
      https://community.acer.com/en/

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1901157 Reply

      WSkxxxk
      AskWoody Lounger

      Susan,

      I am using this as a means to convey 7/26/19 Master-Patch-List errors as I could find no other way.  (Perhaps a link should be on the Master Patch List – for error reports only, questions and comments to the lounge?)

      Under Windows 8.1/Server 2012 R2:  The “Security-only” item has a double error in it.  The listed Patch Number is for a Cumulative IE 11 patch, an alternative to the listed Internet Explorer 11 patch for Win8.1, but the necessary one for Server 2012 R2 – as I understand it.  The link labeled by that Patch Number is to the Monthly Rollup.  The correct Patch Number is 4507457 as in your blog.

      Here comes some comment:   (1) This Security-Only patch, as I read it, is not offered by Windows Update, only through the Microsoft Update Catalog.  Is this unusual?  (I hope.)  (2) Both of the two NET Framework patches looked like a can of worms to this untutored eye.  I did not install them and Windows Update, run after all other patches were installed, did not offer them.

      • #1901159 Reply

        PKCano
        Da Boss

        (1) This Security-Only patch, as I read it, is not offered by Windows Update, only through the Microsoft Update Catalog.

        This has always been the case. The Security only Update and the IE11 CU are Catalog only (or you can download them from AKB2000003 on this site for both Win7 and Win8.1.

        (2) Both of the two NET Framework patches looked like a can of worms to this untutored eye.

        Yes, the Rollup is a bundle that contains separate patches )each with its own KB number) for each of the versions of .NET. Best to get .NET through Windows Update b/c the mechanism knows which versions you have installed and takes care of the installation accordingly.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1901162 Reply

        Susan Bradley
        AskWoody MVP

        I’ll fix thank you!  Security only patches are indeed only the catalog or WSUS.  Even for Windows 7 they do not come down on Microsoft update.  Only the rollup updates come down on Microsoft update.  It’s been this way for a while.

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #1901158 Reply

      AngryJohnny75
      AskWoody Lounger

      I know someone who has a similar (but older) device – a 32 GB eMMC Acer Cloudbook that came with 1507. It’s a cheap laptop that he wanted to use simply to browse the Internet. He used it with 1507 until November 2018 when he had me fix it for him. I managed to use the  the Media Creation Tool and two USB flash drives to get it to upgrade to 1803 at the time. I’m still waiting for him to return it to me so that he can get 1903 installed on it.

      Some folks who purchase these devices think they are getting a bargain. Little do they know that they basically purchased a ‘throw-away’ device. Hopefully they have some IT savvy friends who can fix it for them twice a year. I tell those that I know that there is no such thing as a cheap new Windows 10 laptop or tablet. If their budget is $250 or less, they’re better off with something else, such as an Android tablet.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #1902165 Reply

        rc primak
        AskWoody_MVP

        If they’re going to put out something named a Cloudbook, they could at least use a Cloud OS.  Windows is not there yet, so Chrome OS looks like the current most likely candidate.

        -- rc primak

      • #1905445 Reply

        Ascaris
        AskWoody_MVP

        If all he needs is to browse the internet:

        32GB is plenty of space to run Linux, and you can pick any browser you wish to use.  You might be able to avoid that twice-a-year appointment to fix the laptop!

        It seems like setting up Linux for a non-techie would be asking for trouble, but while I have never tried this personally, I’ve read a lot of testimonials about people doing this and having the friends/family support calls drop to near zero.  You’ve already got problems with Windows 10, and unless it goes on a diet, each new build is going to be a problem.

        Group "L" (KDE Neon User Edition 5.16.4).

    • #1901456 Reply

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Dear Patch Lady, you have proven beyond a shadow of a doubt that the OEM of your ASUs is not someone to be trusted with one’s $$$ when it sends it with Windows 10 installed knowing full well that it will be hard or impossible to upgrade it to some future Win 10 version, and that this will be sooner rather than later given the pace of such upgrades.

      Having accomplished that, you are now entirely free to use your Acer to the full by installing some flavor of LINUX that will fit in your 32 GB with room to spare and serve your reasonable needs well (as long as you do not use it for CAD design of ultra-modern skyscrapers or playing hyperrealistic 3-D games), and can be used unchanged in both software and hardware as it came from factory until and unless you feel like updating it.

      • #1904189 Reply

        anonymous

        wrong OEM OscarCP.  Susan is using an ACER 32gb device, not ASUS

    • #1901939 Reply

      John
      AskWoody Lounger

      I can’t see buying a Windows PC with anything less then 128Gb storage and 8 Gb RAM. I hope you got a good deal on that laptop Susan because more then likely it will be impossible to upgrade anything on it. I would rather buy a cheap notebook with a slow spin drive and then upgrade it to a SSD. It seems PC makers are rather stingy with these Chromebook killers which are really not that useful.

    • #1902164 Reply

      rc primak
      AskWoody_MVP

      Because I dual-boot Windows and Linux, I go for at least a 250GB SSD. Only Intel core-ix processors (for Linux compatibility). And 8 to 16GB RAM, which gets used by both Widnows and Linux for caching in large file transfer operations (like archiving extra copies of a backup set).

      Not so long ago, ASUS and Acer, among others were selling small-capacity (32GB or even 16GB) devices which ran or booted from a required compressed Windows Image (WIMBoot devices). these could not be converted to Linux due to the required WIM during boot-up.  The WIM was inside a ROM which could be written to about eight times before it would become unwritable.  Upgrading these devices, which were sold as 2-in-1 netbooks, was nearly impossible. They could barely survive a year of CUs. Did I mention they were also 64-bit hardware but tied to a 32-bit WIM and OS? They were running Windows 10.

      So things could be worse, Susan, and they have been worse.

      Cheap is as cheap does. But if you want to go really cheap, use a free OS — Linux!

      (Bonus for kids — they may learn how to write code. Linux is very adaptable if you learn how to do some stuff in the Command Line. Many kids see this as a game, not a chore.)

      -- rc primak

    • #1903321 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      I just upgraded my Lenovo Ideapad 100s from 1803 to 1903 using Windows Update. I had to run disk cleanup first, which freed about 9.97 GB of space, before I could kick off the in-place upgrade. It took awhile on the eMMC SSD in this thing, but I’m happily typing this message along on 1903 in Firefox.

      I don’t know why I had success and you had failure; my system is a similar spec to a Stream (Intel Atom CPU, 32GB eMMC SSD drive, 2GB RAM, microSD slot). I’m counting my blessings that I didn’t have the sorts of issues that you have had with yours.

      And if I may (on the Linux suggestion) – the issue I’ve had with that is, these systems (or at least my Ideapad 100s) comes with a 64-bit CPU and a 32-bit UEFI BIOS. After using a 64-bit Ubuntu ISO along with a 32-bit UEFI bios file, I was able to get Ubuntu installed, however sound does not work because the sound drivers are supposedly somehow tied to the CPU and there are no sound drivers that work under Linux. Been there, done that.

    • #1903648 Reply

      JohnFDoe
      AskWoody Lounger

      The problem is mainly from Microsoft’s policy on backward compatibility and updates. It’s great that I can run almost any Windows application from the past 20+ years but it’s also causing all the update headaches and bloat.

      It’s not *required* to cause all that much bloat if that were done reasonably.
      I’m told Xinuos OpenServer 5 Definitive 2018 can still run MS Xenix applications from way back in the 80s…

      Now, optional cross- and backwards-compatibility support as optional virtualization libraries… hm, yeah, I’ve seen that before. All you need is a robust hypervisor and…

      Indeed, as someone knowing their way around the Windows inner workings, I find that the biggest sources of bloat are the following (Numbers are from Win8.1)

      1. Making Windows Installer cache complete MSI files for uninstall, not just the uninstall scripts (instead of fixing the code that checks the signatures on those MSIs) wastes more space than any other part of the the Windows directory.

      2. Keeping almost all files that might be installed (including old versions) under WinSxS wastes about 2 to 3 GB.

      3. Dotnet is more than 2 GB.

      4. Using an almost complete copy of the 32-bit system32 instead of stubs calling their 64 bit counterparts wastes more than 1 GB

      5. Keeping an uncompressed copy of all potentially available drivers wastes hundreds of MB to some GB

      6. The Windows update format introduced with NT 6.00 (CBS) forces updates to include a lot of actually unchanged files, thus wasting space in the update-download directories.

      7. The cumulative update policy (patchocalypse) caused every monthly update to be the size of a full service pack DVD, instead of just the files changed that month, with rare cumulative service packs.

      8. The decision to store the entire install image on the hard drive instead of keeping it on a pristine read-only media.

      9. Various things implemented more than once wastes additional space.

    • #1904186 Reply

      carpintero
      AskWoody Lounger

      don’t have enough room.. cleaned up the C drive… C drive and the SSD drive

      couldn’t find the mounted drive

      Mounted?
      Ok, later in the thread we learn about an SD card,
      which presents a mixture of space and mounting issues, which I would like to tease apart.

      If someone’s C + SSD were to amount to enough room, would the installation still choke on the presence of an SD card?

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by  carpintero.
      • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by  carpintero.
      • #1904431 Reply

        mn–
        AskWoody Lounger

        If someone’s C + SSD were to amount to enough room, would the installation still choke on the presence of an SD card?

        This is the impression I got, at least. Haven’t actually checked myself if it’s so.

        Well, any number of systems have a SD card reader built in nowadays so should be easy to test…

    • #1904483 Reply

      RockE
      AskWoody Plus

      Hi, Susan. I’ve had problems with a woefully underprovisioned computer, too.

      My granddaughter was given an HP Stream Notebook a few years ago which came with Windows 8 installed. The Stream has a 32GB SSD as its C: drive, two USB ports, and a memory card reader. Quite some time ago I slipped in a 64GB memory card and relocated to it the folders named Pictures, Downloads, Videos, etc.
      Over the years I have upgraded it (first to 8.1, then to each version of Windows 10 in turn) until version 1903 came out.
      Each time I contemplated upgrading her Notebook I first made sure that I had all the drivers from HP.
      Each time I created an image of the current operating system (so I could always restore the image in case anything went “pear shaped”).

      Each time I upgraded the system it required more storage than the paltry little 32GB SSD (Windows would ask for extra storage indicating that it needed at least another 10GB). So I would plug in a newly formatted 32GB flash drive each time (and that satisfied its need).
      Each attempted upgrade worked but a few times I had to reinstall the Touchpad driver afterward. (When the touchpad didn’t work after upgrading, I simply plugged in a mouse or trackball and managed to reinstall the Notebook’s touchpad driver.)

      Then a few months ago I began trying to upgrade the system from version 1809 to 1903. Those attempts failed repeatedly until this week.

      Monday night the 1903 upgrade worked! (It worked even though I did nothing differently than the five times it failed over the last two months.)
      Her Notebook is now running Windows 10 Home version 1903 (OS Build 18362.267).

      Here’s hoping that perhaps you, too, will have success next time you attempt to upgrade to 1903.

      Image or Clone often! Backup, backup, backup, backup......
      - - - - -
      Home Built: Windows 10 Home 64-bit, AMD Athlon II X3 435 CPU, 16GB RAM, ASUSTeK M4A89GTD-PRO/USB3 (AM3) motherboard, 512GB SanDisk SSD, 3 TB WD HDD, 1024MB ATI AMD RADEON HD 6450 video, ASUS VE278 (1920x1080) display, ATAPI iHAS224 Optical Drive, integrated Realtek HD Audio

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by  RockE. Reason: typo
      1 user thanked author for this post.

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    Reply To: Patch Lady – for those keeping track

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