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  • Patch Lady – my favorite new windows update setting

    Posted on Susan Bradley Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Patch Lady – my favorite new windows update setting

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      • #2306229 Reply
        Susan Bradley
        Da Boss

        So you want to ensure you get feature release XXXX and no later than that right?  So you are on 1903, you forgot to download the 1909 iso and yet you
        [See the full post at: Patch Lady – my favorite new windows update setting]

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      • #2306236 Reply
        tf231909
        AskWoody Plus

        AWESOME!  You ROCK!  Thank you thank you thank you!  (Let’s hope Microsoft doesn’t break this later.)

      • #2306238 Reply
        cobber2076
        AskWoody Plus

        If I use “Select the target Feature Update version”, should I disable “Select when Preview Builds and Feature Updates are received”?  I’m using the latter now.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2306239 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          You should use either TargetReleaseVersion or Feature Deferrals , but not both. If you use TargetReleaseVersion, set deferrals to 0 0r 1, as they are going to be ignored anyway.

          3 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2306248 Reply
            anonymous
            Guest

            And if I understand correctly, even using TargetReleaseVersion doesn’t prevent a future update should one’s current version go out of support. Is that correct?

          • #2306414 Reply
            Coldheart9020
            AskWoody Lounger

            You should use either TargetReleaseVersion or Feature Deferrals , but not both.

            Does this include the Feature deferral pulldown in Windows Update > Advanced options, or just the GP setting?

            So, if I have the target Feature Update version in GP set to 1909, should I then not have the Feature deferral set to 365 days in the Windows Update deferral pulldown, and instead set it to 0 days the same as Quality update deferral?

            • #2306423 Reply
              PKCano
              Da Boss

              It means ANY Feature deferral. Wherever you set it.
              You should only use EITHER TargetReleaseVersion OR Feature deferral.
              NOT both.
              So, if you use TargetReleaseVersion, set deferrals to 0 0r 1, as they are going to be ignored anyway.

              2 users thanked author for this post.
              • #2306436 Reply
                Coldheart9020
                AskWoody Lounger

                I felt that the deferral pulldown and the GP setting would achieve the same outcome, but just wanted to be sure. I had 365 Feature deferral set as well as the Target Release Version set to 1909; I’m glad I read Susan’s article this morning.

                Edit: I also notice it’s in your revised version of AKB2000016. I should have read more carefully 🙂

                This way I’m good until well into next year, if that proves necessary. I also have an ISO of v2004 build 19041.450 (August 11) stored, just in case it’s ever needed.

                Thank you for the clarification. I’ve removed Feature deferrals and now just have the GP setting – 1909.

          • #2308003 Reply
            CyGuy
            AskWoody Plus

            When using TargetReleaseVersion, which naming convention should be entered?  For example (and going forward), should it 20H2 or 2009? Or doesn’t it matter?  Thanks.

            • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by CyGuy.
            • #2308007 Reply
              PKCano
              Da Boss

              1909, 2004, and 2010 (that’s right, not 20H2, according to @abbodi86).
              See #2307172.

              You are not really serious about installing 20H2 yet, are you? It’s Beta!

              1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2306273 Reply
        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        With reference to the registry edit within the Computerworld article for TargetReleaseVersion:
        As the Windows 10 Home versions (x86/x64) do not come with the Group Policy Editor, will these settings be honoured so it will stick? Or would home version users need to use 3rd party WU blockers instead or together with (to feel assured)?
        just curious

        No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
        • #2306277 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          Read Section 1 on “Setting TargetReleaseVersion” in AKB2000016.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2306279 Reply
          Microfix
          AskWoody MVP

          **NOTE: According to official sources, these settings are ignored in Home Edition, but at the current time, it appears that the manually made settings in the Policy section of the Registry also work for Home Edition. That may be changed by Microsoft in the future.

          So WU Blockers are still a reliable safeguard for Home Editions – curiousity satisfied
          I’d certainly feel safer using a 3rd party blocker with WUShowhide or WUMgr on a metered connection if I were a home edition user.
          Thanks PK 🙂

          No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
          • #2306340 Reply
            KP
            AskWoody Plus

            For Windows 10 1809 Home 32-bit, I have manually put in (even though it not suppose to have any effect) the registry settings to
            i) not upgrade
            ii) set the OS to 1809

            I also have Metered Connection On.

            The PC may have tried to upgrade the OS one time during the last month, but when I checked the OS, it was still on 1809.

            Currently I get no updates offered. I have to manually download and install the monthly Microsoft Updates. I like it this way. I check there are no outstanding updates using WUMT.

            PC still runs however the machine is kind of slow, so I only use it occasionally.

            P.S. I will likely apply the Nov 2020 patches, before doing the 1909 upgrade.

      • #2306306 Reply
        EspressoWillie
        AskWoody Plus

        Great!!

        So while I was in there, are there suggested settings for say the Manage preview builds or Quality Update settings?

        Cheers!!
        Willie McClure
        www.datarim.com
        Talk's cheap, takes money to buy whiskey.
        • #2306311 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          Run through AKB2000016 for information – screenshots at the bottom.
          From v1909 onward, as Susan says, TargetReleaseVersion is the easiest to use in Win10 Pro. Just don’t forget to change the targeted version before EOL.

      • #2306338 Reply
        Tex265
        AskWoody Plus

        What happens to the Windows Advanced GUI setting in Windows Update where we usually set the  Feature Update deferral to 365 days when you make this Group Policy setting to say 1909? (or another?)

        Does it go to 0 days?  Gray out?  Disappear?

        Should we set the GUI Feature deferral days to a number other than 365 days BEFORE making the Group Policy setting?

        Windows 10 Pro x64 v1909 and Windows 7 Pro SP1 x64 (RIP)
      • #2306353 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        I have this implemented on all PCs here. Despite being told not to, one person clicked on Check for updates. I had set it to 1809. Windows Downloaded and started installing 1903 despite these settings. Windows 10 x64 Enterprise 1809 LTSC.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2306372 Reply
          Susan Bradley
          Da Boss

          You are on Long term servicing branch?  https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/release-information/

          I’ve not tested on long term servicing branch just normal Windows 10…but that said I don’t see a LTSB for 1903?

          https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/whats-new/ltsc/

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady

          • #2306432 Reply
            doriel
            AskWoody Lounger

            We have LSTC entry 2016 (which is 1607 I believe) and 2019 entry (1809). We buy these for our Advantech touch panels, but there was this “jump” between them. I was asking Advantech for the most recent LSTC and he said, that 2019 entry is the latest we can get 🙂

            Neverthe less, I think, that mr. Anonymous might be actually right. Im not sure, but LSTC does not mean your PC will not update if you click the button. I was warned aboud this. Its just that your license is supported 10 years. That does not mean it works differently from other Windows 10.
            Never the less LSTC is not for Office computers, so.. maybe mr. Anonymous is using this wrong for office PC.
            Also, I locked our LSTC panels with EWFMGR (it is similar to Windows emebded in the past). Changes are simply lost after restart. So if anybody (by accident) clicks the button, these changes will be wiped next reboot.

            BTW setiting up kiosk in Windows 10 is one of its best features remaining hidden to vast majority of users! Wonder why, lot customer whants exactly that!

            Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

            HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

            • This reply was modified 1 month ago by doriel. Reason: additional info
            • #2306489 Reply
              Susan Bradley
              Da Boss

              If you “check for updates” whatever is in preview – for example the preview cumulative updates – will come down.  You can “let” the machine find the feature release but when I’m in an impatient mode, I will – depending on the date on the calendar – click on check for updates.  LTSC 1809 will stay on 1809.   It will get monthly updates and preview updates though anytime you click on check for updates.

              Susan Bradley Patch Lady

              1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2306566 Reply
            anonymous
            Guest

            All PCs here are on 1809 LTSC except this one PC as the user feels without Cortana he is unable to use Windows 10 effectively. This, despite the fact that his 1809 comes out of support in 3 weeks. I believe I read somewhere that Cortana is being moved to 365 users only, so he’s going to lose that anyway.

            But my understanding was that LTSC was not a requirement for the TargetReleaseVersion tweak?

      • #2306376 Reply
        AlexEiffel
        AskWoody_MVP

        Thank, it is a useful setting, but as someone who indirectly support plenty of autonomous stations not on a domain, I find it is less practical than using the “defer for as long as possible the feature updates” policy. Having to change the version number on each individual station is not great.

        Using the oldest supported release has the advantage that hopefully most bugs are ironed out without having to change any GP after an update. Choosing your version might be useful to skip the beta versions and run only the SP versions (running 1909, 20H2, not 1903 and 2004).

        • #2306384 Reply
          Susan Bradley
          Da Boss

          The defer for 365 days triggers inadvertent installs.  You could always build and export out the reg key and use that method.

          Susan Bradley Patch Lady

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2306589 Reply
            AlexEiffel
            AskWoody_MVP

            Is that new because I have yet to see any of our machines right now running Pro with GP deferral and ask before install having been moved to 2004?

            Yes, I could export the reg key. I try to have autonomous stations in a set it and forget it mode.  The reg key is srill something you send people and you need admin rights ro apply.

            But if GP defferal is broken, I might have no choice.

            • #2306596 Reply
              Paul T
              AskWoody MVP

              The reg key is srill something you send people and you need admin rights ro apply

              As long as the machines are on a network you can get to and you have admin credentials, you will be able to apply that registry key remotely – using Powershell etc.

              cheers, Paul

              1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2306607 Reply
              PKCano
              Da Boss

              I have never had the 365 deferral cause an inadvertent install, as long as you are aware of the version the PC is on and the 365-day point of the next released version. I don’t believe that function is broken.

              But it can happen if you just leave PCs unattended/unmonitored. If you have all PCs on the same version, and all set to 365-days, that’s fine. If, on the other hand, the PCs are on different versions and you have MANY, it can be almost impossible to keep up individually. So in that case, TargetReleaseVersion is safer b/c is assures all PCs are at the same point and you can set a timetable/schedule for change.

              What I see is the big difference between a business environment where mass control is needed and the consumer environment where individual control/attention is possible

              1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #2306805 Reply
                AlexEiffel
                AskWoody_MVP

                Yes, I am kind of in-between. We have a good amount of stations and laptops, but not on the same network, scattered across North America. I wouldn’t say at all I am close to a consumer environment, but I am a bit of a rogue for managing PCs. I don’t care that they don’t run the same version, as long as they run an old supported version and update without issues by themselves.

                For me, the GP deferral worked fine until now, except that feature updates sometimes didn’t install until I manually green lighted them, even if support had ended. I had stations sitting with feature updates waiting and never installing until the user clicked install. That’s pretty bad security-wise, but it is interesting that I had this problem while everyone else seemed to struggle to not get those feature updates. I don’t think it does that anymore. Maybe it was a bug on one of the older versions. I got normal updates until the feature update and then it waited for the user to click install now and never installed by itself.

                The setting is interesting if you want to skip versions and run the same version a bit longer than the few months of support remaining when you defer 365 days.

                1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2306431 Reply
        doriel
        AskWoody Lounger

        Thank you Microsoft! Finally! This is what could get the job done! This seems like what we have been asking for. At least SOME control over updates.

        Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

        HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

      • #2306440 Reply
        CraigS26
        AskWoody Plus

        Per Susan’s quoted CW article below …. can someone clarify What she means in associating the GP Deferral Setup Date with blocking an Unwanted New Version. And, is my 365 Deferral From 2004’s Release date, (or Now) 20H2 Rel date, or what?

        C W quote: [Historically, I’ve recommended using the setting in Windows 10 to defer feature releases up to 365 days. But keeping track of that as a date on a calendar was nearly impossible. Unless you wrote down on a calendar — the date — you set up the group policy setting — , you’d invariably find your PC suddenly installing a feature release. It was not the ideal way to handle feature releases.]

         

        W10-64 1909 Pro / Hm-Stdnt Ofce '16 C2R / HP Envy Desktop-Ethernet/ 12 GB / 256G SSD + 1 TB HDD / i5-8400 Coffee Lake/ GP=2 + FtrU=Semi-Annual + Feature Defer = 1 + QU=0 + TRV = 2004

        • #2306442 Reply
          doriel
          AskWoody Lounger

          I think, that all versions have “release date”. If you set 365 days defferral, they will be installed with one year delay from official release date, on which they were offered for users via Windows Update.

          Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

          HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

        • #2306443 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          Remember Susan comes from a business environment where control of updating must be applied to many PCs and not on an individual PC basis. In that environment, the IT manager cannot keep up with the settings for hundreds of individual machines. So a setting needs to be “set and forget,” and the settings everywhere changed to known values according to a company standard, on a set schedule/timetable.

          On the other hand, the consumer environment is quite different. A great number of consumers are on default settings and completely unaware of controls to updating. Those who are somewhat technically inclined are usually focused on one, or a limited number of PCs. They are more aware of settings, the update cycle, and EOLs of each version. They usually know where their machines stand in relation to these points.

          So, given those differences in environment, it is much easier for IT to set every PC at a known value and schedule coordinated changes to achieve their goals. In this case, TargetReleaseVersion is a much better, safer solution.

          The consumer has more latitude. Using TargetReleaseVersion is easy because of awareness of the version the PC is currently on, and being able to make a choice of which version is desirable. So this is one way to control Feature updates.
          But all of the consumer’s machines do not have to be on the same version at the same time, or meet a set standard/timeline, like in the business environment. If deferrals are used, instead of TargetReleaseVersion, the consumer can be aware of the end of each deferral period and the EOL of the version, and not be a victim of forced upgrades every six months.

          So consumers have more leeway in choosing between TargetReleaseVersion and Feature Deferrals.  As a consumer, you should choose the one that works best for you.

          **** However, one thing is clear. Use EITHER TargetReleaseVersion OR Feature deferrals, but NOT BOTH. If you use TargetReleaseVersion, set deferrals to 0 0r 1, as they are going to be ignored anyway.

          3 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2306488 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        And now with the Oct. 2020 updates we can unblock Microsoft blocks for new feature updates.

      • #2306529 Reply
        JC Zorkoff
        AskWoody Plus

        In a post above (#2306443), PKCano said:

        **** However, one thing is clear. Use EITHER TargetReleaseVersion OR Feature deferrals, but NOT BOTH.

        This statement is not quite correct.

        When I look over the Microsoft documentation (linked to in post #2306251) it says, regarding the Group Policy Setting “Select the target Feature Update version”:

        When you use this policy, specify the version that you want your device(s) to use. If you don’t update this before the device reaches end of service, the device will automatically be updated once it is 60 days past end of service for its edition.

        When you set the target version policy, if you specify a feature update version that is older than your current version or set a value that isn’t valid, the device will not receive any feature updates until the policy is updated. When you specify target version policy, feature update deferrals will not be in effect.

        Therefore:

        #1 – Setting the target release version will invalidate the other deferral settings. (i.e. Any deferral values do not matter.)

        #2 – Setting a target to an older or invalid version will PERMANENTLY DEFER any feature updates until the policy is changed.

        This looks like a backdoor trick to guarantee that no Feature Update will occur until you want it.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2306533 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          I don’t see where that invalidates “Use EITHER TargetReleaseVersion OR Feature deferrals, but NOT BOTH.”

          If you want to delay/control Feature updates, it does you no service to use both methods. You can use either one exclusively and they serve the purpose of delaying/preventing Feature upgrades. If you set both, deferrals will not work. If you use TargetReleaseVersion, set deferrals to 0 0r 1, as it’s going to be ignored anyway. The above statement helps eliminate confusion on the part of consumers.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2306594 Reply
        Bob99
        Guest

        Curiously, setting the TargetReleaseVersion to 20H2 and the Feature Update setting to semi-annual with no days’ deferral (0)(zero) results in the 20H2 offering being absent in wushowhide. This is on a system with 2004 and September’s monthly update installed.
        R/
        Bob99

        • #2306813 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          Per @abbodi86, the setting for TargetReleaseVersion should be 2010, not 20H2.

          Microsoft! Who can figure!!!

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2306840 Reply
            Bob99
            Guest

            I just ran a test to confirm and, yes, only setting the TargetReleaseVersion to 2010 works at this point to make the 20H2 update show up in wushowhide.

            Sounds like a minor edit of the AKB is in order with regards to this development, thanks to Microsoft!  🙁

            Hopefully they go back to the customary naming convention they’ve used to this point to avoid confusion. After all, their instructions in GPedit clearly state to enter the version just as it appears on the version you’re trying to stay on. Half the room calling it 20H2 and the other half calling it 2010 is normally a non-starter! But we are talking about MS here.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2306841 Reply
              Bob99
              Guest

              Just for additional clarification, the test was conducted with Feature deferral enabled and set to zero days and TargetReleaseVersion set to 20H2 and then to 2010. Setting it to 2010 produced the hide-able result in wushowhide.

              R/

              Bob99

              2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2306857 Reply
        Tex265
        AskWoody Plus

        If my memory is correct,  a long while back (ver 1809 or 1903) PKCano played around with making Feature Update deferral and Quality Update deferral via the Windows Update GUI vs utilizing the Group Policy settings.  I seem to recall that while producing similar out comes, Windows made the changes in different parts of the Registry –  am I correct so far?

        If so, then if you are on ver 1909 and utilize Group Policy to set TargetReleaseVersion, do you also need to use Group Policy to Enable, then set Feature Update delay to 0 days?  Or can you still utilize the Windows Update GUI > Advanced Options to set the Feature Update delay to 0 days while using Group Policy for TargetReleaseVersion setting?

        PKCano says to use Either/Or but not Both, but I assume this pertains to the Group Policy settings (only thing available beginning with ver 2004), not the Windows Update GUI (still available in ver 1909).

        I dont see how you can  turn the GUI Feature Update deferral OFF other than set the days to 0 (zero).

        Windows 10 Pro x64 v1909 and Windows 7 Pro SP1 x64 (RIP)
        • #2306892 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          It means ANY Feature deferral. Wherever you set it. If you use TargetReleaseVersion, set deferrals to 0 or 1, as it’s going to be ignored anyway.
          You should only use EITHER TargetReleaseVersion OR Feature deferral.
          NOT both.

        • #2306889 Reply
          JC Zorkoff
          AskWoody Plus

          See my post above. If using TargetReleaseVersion the other deferral settings are ignored.

           

      • #2307363 Reply
        ChrisAVWood
        AskWoody Plus

        Just want to get some clarification.

        I have set this on 2 laptops one with 2004 and the other with 1909 and set it to 2004. Checking for updates on the 2004 gave me the October 2004 updates. Great.

        I want to upgrade my other laptop from 1909 to 2004. Do I install 2004 from an ISO (the way I have always performed these upgrades ala Woody) or can I simply check for updates and it will put me to 2004?

        Thanks

        Chris

        • #2307368 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          If you set TargetReleaseVersion to 2004, you should be offered v2004 through Windows Update once the system scans for updates on its own.

          Either way you upgrade will work. If you do it through WU, you will get 2004 up-to-date. If you use the ISO, it may not be the latest Build.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2307374 Reply
            ChrisAVWood
            AskWoody Plus

            Great. I will check for updates in the next few days on my 1909 (once Woody and Susan say it is good) and I should finish on 2004 with October updates.

             

            Thanks

             

            Chris

            • #2307601 Reply
              Paul T
              AskWoody MVP

              Do not manually “check for updates”. Let Windows do it for you, otherwise you may end up with updates you don’t want.

              cheers, Paul

      • #2307620 Reply
        CraigS26
        AskWoody Plus

        If you set TargetReleaseVersion to 2004, you should be offered v2004 through Windows Update once the system scans for updates on its own. Either way you upgrade will work. If you do it through WU, you will get 2004 up-to-date. If you use the ISO, it may not be the latest Build.

        In the “A little knowledge is dangerous” category …. I’m ready to do TRV = 2004, too. Does my 365 Deferral NOW refer to 20H2, or Should it be changed to -0- because the TRV 2004 setting prevents 20H2, anyway, Or is some other Run: Gpedit.msc setting requd before the TRV change that allows 2004?

        What about GP=2 setting? Leave & will I then see 2004 is Ready & just Clk a Dnload button?

        For fun, I’ve got the 10.0.19041-(450) ISO via MCT (9/14) and the Heidoc site only shows — 2004 May 2020 — as a Dnlod choice. Is the Only way to know what Dnload Ver is offered is to Dnload it and do the DISM exercise? No one has spoken of this, AFAIK.

        W10-64 1909 Pro / Hm-Stdnt Ofce '16 C2R / HP Envy Desktop-Ethernet/ 12 GB / 256G SSD + 1 TB HDD / i5-8400 Coffee Lake/ GP=2 + FtrU=Semi-Annual + Feature Defer = 1 + QU=0 + TRV = 2004

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by CraigS26.
        • #2307626 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          If you use TargetReleaseVersion, according to MS documentation the Feature deferral setting will be ignored. If you set TargetReleaseVersion = 2004, that is the version you get and Feature deferrals then don’t refer to anything. So my recommendation in to set deferrals to 0 or 1 (since they will be ignored anyway). But you need to do that AFTER you set TargetReleaseVersion and APPLY it, or you leave yourself open to deferral of 0 or 1 being your only protection (and you would get 20H2.).
          MS documentation also says that if you use TargetReleaseVersion, and the version you set reaches EOL, you will be force upgraded after 60 days. So you need to keep that in mind also.

          You should basically use one or the other to control Feature updates, but not both.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2308364 Reply
          ChrisAVWood
          AskWoody Plus

          I did check for updates on my 1909 laptop after setting the reg keys to 2004 and got to the current stable 2004 build 572.  This worked like a charm. I was offered the optional ‘newer’ cumulative update but I didn’t accept and so am on build 572.

          Thanks

          Chris

          • #2308369 Reply
            Paul T
            AskWoody MVP

            Windows Home or Pro?
            Did you set the reg values manually or via group policy?

            cheers, Paul

      • #2307625 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Does my 365 Deferral NOW refer to 20H2,

        Your 365 refers to number of days from your CURRENT installed Windows 10 version release date.
        If you are on 1909 365 days end at November 12, 2020.
        1909 EOL is May 2021 (18 months of support).

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2307633 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          That is not correct.

          The deferral days refers to the number of days since the release date of the version you are deferring, not the release date of the version you are currently running.

          If you are on 1909:
          2004 was released May 27, 2020, so that is the start on the number of deferral says for 2004 (around 160 days as of 10/28).
          20H2 was released Oct 20, 2020, so that is the start on the number of deferral says for 2004 (around 8 days as of 10/28).

          So, on 1909, as of 10/28 (# of days must be adjusted accordingly after 10/28)
          deferral less than 8 days will get 20H2
          Deferral of 10-150 days will defer 20H2 and get 2004

      • #2307628 Reply
        CraigS26
        AskWoody Plus

        Thanks, Alex. Thought I remembered that it was 365 from the “most recent officially released Ver”, hence the confusion.

        BUT, once I enter 2004 in the TargetRerleaseVer box, what about the settings in my Signature – any need changing?

        W10-64 1909 Pro / Hm-Stdnt Ofce '16 C2R / HP Envy Desktop-Ethernet/ 12 GB / 256G SSD + 1 TB HDD / i5-8400 Coffee Lake/ GP=2 + FtrU=Semi-Annual + Feature Defer = 1 + QU=0 + TRV = 2004

        • #2307630 Reply
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          Changing the TRV will result in: 365 days from the release of 1909, only update to 2004.

          cheers, Paul

        • #2307634 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          If you set TargetRerleaseVersion, according to MS the Feature deferral setting will be ignored. See above,

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2307651 Reply
            The Surfing Pensioner
            AskWoody Plus

            Hi, I have now set my TRV to 1909, for the time being, and so want to cancel the Feature deferral previously set to 365. My updates are currently paused until we move to Defcon 3 or higher; if I revert the Feature deferral to 0 – but touch nothing else – will it trigger a Search for Updates? Silly question, I’m sure, but you can’t be too careful when you’re not totally sure what you’re doing! Many thanks.

            • #2307655 Reply
              PKCano
              Da Boss

              if I revert the Feature deferral to 0 – but touch nothing else – will it trigger a Search for Updates?

              It should not (but I’m not Microsoft)
              I’d reboot the computer to be sure TRV in GP takes affect, and wait a couple of days (again to be sure), then do it.

      • #2307644 Reply
        CraigS26
        AskWoody Plus

        2 Macrium Images & Then ….. I “Applied” 2004 in Business WU TRV and Then made Feature Deferral -0- although it isn’t supposed to matter. WU is checking daily early a.m., so tomorrow I’ll hopefully have a 1st glimpse of some result (nothing is in wushowhide now) – & I’ll update when relevant.

        PKC, I only saw Alex’s post earlier and thus replied only to him, although your’s appears ahead of him now. ??  Thanks to all for the Replies.

        W10-64 1909 Pro / Hm-Stdnt Ofce '16 C2R / HP Envy Desktop-Ethernet/ 12 GB / 256G SSD + 1 TB HDD / i5-8400 Coffee Lake/ GP=2 + FtrU=Semi-Annual + Feature Defer = 1 + QU=0 + TRV = 2004

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by CraigS26.
      • #2307718 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        if I revert the Feature deferral to 0 – but touch nothing else – will it trigger a Search for Updates?

        It should not (but I’m not Microsoft)
        I’d reboot the computer to be sure TRV in GP takes affect, and wait a couple of days (again to be sure), then do it.

        Won’t running ‘usoclient.exe StartScan’ force scan for update ?

        • #2307723 Reply
          The Surfing Pensioner
          AskWoody Plus

          I wouldn’t know, my Latin’s a bit rusty these days. But scanning for updates is precisely what I don’t want to do right at the moment.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2308195 Reply
        doriel
        AskWoody Lounger

        this seems pretty accurate.

        Source HERE

        tag-definiton

        Dell Latitude E6530, Intel Core i5 @ 2.6 GHz, 4GB RAM, W10 1809 Enterprise

        HAL3000, AMD Athlon 200GE @ 3,4 GHz, 8GB RAM, Fedora 29

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      • #2308664 Reply
        Microfix
        AskWoody MVP

        Wonder how long it will be before MS ignore the older deferral settings in favor of the TRV (TargetReleaseVersion)?
        scary thought if avoiding feature updates…screams will tell

        No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created IT - AE
      • #2308674 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        Wonder how long it will be before MS ignore the older deferral settings in favor of the TRV (TargetReleaseVersion)?
        scary thought if avoiding feature updates…screams will tell

        Microsoft did away with “older deferral” (advanced options: quality/feature) settings in 2004 Pro.
        We have now only Windows Update for Business / TVR.

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