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  • Patch Lady – World Book encylopedia never did this

    Posted on Susan Bradley Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Home Forums AskWoody blog Patch Lady – World Book encylopedia never did this

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      • #2135973 Reply
        Susan Bradley
        AskWoody MVP

        Last night I posted a concern I had about the upcoming Office 365 “Browser hijack” whereby Office 365 pro plus is planning to insert into the Chrome b
        [See the full post at: Patch Lady – World Book encylopedia never did this]

        Susan Bradley Patch Lady

      • #2136004 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        The talk page primarily brings up the fact that it hasn’t happened yet, not that it isn’t a browser hijacker.  I agree.  it shouldn’t be listed yet, it should be listed when released.

        No argument that it is browser hijacking.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2136044 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Wikipedia is more concerned with raising funds than vetting/maintaining factual content on their web based “encyclopedia”. A strange universe exists in that neck of cyberspace that’s neither complete nor properly maintained/curated.

        But this sort of Browser and search engine hijacking is just getting started on MS’s 10 Closed OS/Application Ecosystem as that sort of data collection of end user metrics is big business in that targeted and analytics sort of snooping activity done in the name of targeted marketing and ad pushing.

        I’d only expect that this will get progressively worse now that 7’s EOL and 8.1’s living on burrowed time.  Maybe the Browser makers need let the end user lock that search engine setting under a user generated password and limit any programmatic access to any browser settings without the end user permission.

        I’m on Firefox and not IE or CRedge but it’s an eternal game of cat and mouse with the folks in Redmond under Windows 10/Edge-whatever and MS’s other Cloud based offerings. 2020 is just getting started so expect more doubling down coming from the direction of Redmond as the year progresses.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2136846 Reply
          Paul T
          AskWoody MVP

          Wikipedia is more concerned with raising funds than vetting/maintaining factual content on their web based “encyclopedia”

          Personal opinion or fact, references please.

          cheers, Paul

      • #2136102 Reply
        WildBill
        AskWoody Plus

        I looked at the Revision History for that page & it shows back & forth changes. Searching again on the “Browser hijacking” page for “Office 365” & “Microsoft Office” a/o 6:25 PM CST; not found. Printed encyclopedias & dictionaries never had this problem… as they said on “Laugh-In” in the 1960’s & 70’s, “Look that up in your Funk & Wagnalls!”

        Windows 8.1, 64-bit, back in Group A... & leaning toward Windows 10 V2004. As long as it's a Lot Less Buggy!
        Wild Bill Rides Again...

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2136117 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Already a fix –

        From Ghacks –

        Administrators who don’t want this to happen can prevent the installation easily according to Microsoft, and if it is installed already, it is easy enough to stop using Bing as the default search engine as well (there is a toggle to use the previous default search engine again)

        Admins may run the following command to remove the extension again:

        C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft\DefaultPackPC\MainBootStrap.exe uninstallAll

        https://www.ghacks.net/2020/01/23/microsoft-will-install-a-bing-search-extension-in-chrome-on-some-customer-systems/

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2136197 Reply
        mbhelwig
        AskWoody Lounger

        There is another answer to this problem — Use Libre office — been using it for years

        mbhelwig

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2136202 Reply
          OscarCP
          AskWoody Plus

          Or use a version of Office that runs entirely on one’s computer, not on the Web, unless one needs the ability to connect to Office anywhere, any time, but does not have one’s own computer handy all the time. I imagine that could happen, just not to me. Susan might know of other cases where using Office 365 is necessary.

          As to back and forth editing in Wikipedia: that is an old characteristic and happens by the very nature of it being a Wiki that anybody can use by opening an account with a minimum of fuss. I have seen back and forth discussions there that make watching paint dry a most desirable activity, by comparison.

          Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2136469 Reply
          AmbularD
          AskWoody Plus

          Or OpenOffice.

          i7-4790k - Z97X-Gaming 3 - DDR3 2133 x 32GB - GTX 1070 FTW - Windows 7 Pro x64 SP1

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2137318 Reply
            Fred
            AskWoody Plus

            Or OpenOffice.

            + LibreOffice aswell

            After all.. Just because we're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get us.
      • #2136309 Reply
        WildBill
        AskWoody Plus

        Huzzah! The link to Microsoft Office 365 ProPlus on Wikipedia’s “Browser hijacking” page is there… and works! Click the link on Patch Lady’s original post. Now, has William H. Connolley given up a/o earlier this morning? We’ll see…

        Windows 8.1, 64-bit, back in Group A... & leaning toward Windows 10 V2004. As long as it's a Lot Less Buggy!
        Wild Bill Rides Again...

      • #2136482 Reply
        lurks about
        AskWoody Lounger

        What Wikipedia finally decides is irrelevant but MS’ behavior is totally unacceptable. Users have set their defaults for their convenience and no one else. Changing the defaults is below unethical and in my opinion borderline criminal (harsh yes but it’s my system not MS’).

        6 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2137134 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          I don’t like it either & I’m not defending them but– You said “it’s my system not MS'”. Technically, you just own the license to the Microsoft S/W (the right to use it) & the license probably says something to the effect that they can make whatever changes they want to that S/W whenever they want, w/o notification to you or approval from you. If you don’t want them monkeying around w/ “your” S/W, you’ll have to use their unsupported S/W (past End of Life), if at all legitimately available anymore, or other brands. However, most other brands probably have the same license terms, but many don’t exploit those terms like Msft. does.

      • #2138452 Reply
        Cybertooth
        AskWoody Plus

        Apropos of this conversation, Dedoimedo has a new post reporting on (OK, complaining about) the installation procedure for Office 2016 when you don’t want to install everything in the suite:

        We’ve gone from simple, friendly click-click wizards to command line plus config files.

         

        • #2139610 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          This has been the general standard by Microsoft for a while now.  Remember Windows 10 is a Tonka toy of confusing options where the old system allowed you to modify things through basic wizards or management interfaces.  Server management isn’t any better.  Some of the features I used to control in older Exchange 2007/2003/2000 I’m now required to write powershell code for (in 2013.  When I move to 2019 i expect this to get worse).  Not that Powershell code isn’t useful or a nice addition, but the loss of ease of access/management is a large hit.

          Although, job security comes with the added frustration, so I guess it works out for me in the end.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2140246 Reply
        Cybertooth
        AskWoody Plus

        This has been the general standard by Microsoft for a while now.  Remember Windows 10 is a Tonka toy of confusing options where the old system allowed you to modify things through basic wizards or management interfaces.  Server management isn’t any better.  Some of the features I used to control in older Exchange 2007/2003/2000 I’m now required to write powershell code for (in 2013.  When I move to 2019 i expect this to get worse).  Not that Powershell code isn’t useful or a nice addition, but the loss of ease of access/management is a large hit.

        Although, job security comes with the added frustration, so I guess it works out for me in the end.

        It sounds like a (perhaps not so) subtle way to discourage Microsoft customers from doing things their own way and to channel them into doing things the way MS prefers.

         

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