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  • Phantom file won't delete

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 10 Questions: Win10 Phantom file won't delete

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      • #2170645 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        I have a file on my desktop that won’t go away. When I try to delete it, I get a message “file not found.”

        I did a search and found there were related files “somewhere” that also won’t go away.

        I tried Unblocker, but it didn’t help. Any suggestions?

        WizFile64_2020-02-24_14-04-17

        Attachments:
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2170811 Reply
        Bundaburra
        AskWoody Plus

        How are you trying to delete?  Have you tried the DEL command from the command prompt?  (Open an admin level command prompt and type in DEL /? to see the options.)

        Windows 10 Pro 64 bit 1909

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2170924 Reply
        Zig
        AskWoody Plus

        Not sure what’s going on here, but I note 3 things:

        a) The file in question at one time was in Windows.old, which is best removed by using Disk Cleanup.

        b) One of the shortcuts has two “dots” before lnk, which might be contributing to the problem.

        c) another of the shortcuts seems to be a duplicate “(2)” of the shortcut mentioned in b), above.

        HTH,

        Zig

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2170942 Reply
        Alex5723
        AskWoody Plus

        I have a file on my desktop that won’t go away

        Have you tried deleting in Safe Mode or using a Live Linux ?

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2171038 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        I’d do it at a Command Prompt.

        List the files
        dir c:\users\Mordechai\Desktop\Rem*

        Delete the files by specifying most of the file name followed by a star.
        del c:\users\Mordechai\Desktop\Remember*
        or
        del c:\users\Mordechai\Desktop\Remember*.*

        Same for the other directories shown.

        cheers, Paul

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Paul T.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2171271 Reply
          Morty
          AskWoody Plus

          Curiouser and curiouser.

          Here’s what I got:

          cmd-del-remember

          Attachments:
          • #2171292 Reply
            anonymous
            Guest

            It may give a different result with “elevated privileges.” The title bar for your window as displayed here shows the stock icon with the words “Command Prompt”, instead of “Administrator: Command Prompt”.

            In Wim7, as the action taken to launch the window, I would right-click the menu icon and select Administrator from the magic popup menu. Does that work the same in Win10?

            1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2171299 Reply
            Zig
            AskWoody Plus

            A little off-topic, but it would be good practice to NAME your C: drive (e.g., System) to avoid drive confusion in the future.

            Zig

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2171301 Reply
        jabeattyauditor
        AskWoody Lounger

        Is the file actually visible on your Desktop (i.e., not just in a file viewer of some sort)?

        Have you tried checking/emptying your recycle bin to see if the parent file is stashed there?

        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #2171344 Reply
          Morty
          AskWoody Plus

          Yes, it is visible. And yes, the parent file was in the Recycle bin. I restored it and then tried deleting both. Only the original file went back to the Recycle bin. The other one couldn’t be found still. And it’s still hiding in plain site on the desktop.

          explorer_2020-02-25_23-16-58

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          1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2171330 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        I’m not sure I understand. To me the C drive was always the System drive. Why would I need to name it?

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Morty.
        • #2171591 Reply
          Zig
          AskWoody Plus

          You name your drives to avoid confusion when, e.g., cloning or replacing drives, or after a major FUBAR, when you need to restore drives. Windows sometimes changes drive LETTERS, but you can keep track of which drive is which by giving them NAMES (e.g., System, Data, Backup). Go to File Explorer, Right-click on each drive, go down to Properties, and, walla, there’s a box to enter the Name.

          Zig

      • #2171349 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        It may give a different result with “elevated privileges.” The title bar for your window as displayed here shows the stock icon with the words “Command Prompt”, instead of “Administrator: Command Prompt”.

        This is turning into a mystery novel.

        The plot thickens: I tried using administrative privileges and wound up in a “PowerShell” command window. And it seems to have run out of power:

        powershell_2020-02-25_23-30-33

        Attachments:
        • #2171522 Reply
          Rick Corbett
          AskWoody_MVP

          As you’ve found out, some ‘old style’ commands do not work in the PowerShell commandline window.

          If you end up in an elevated PowerShell command window (i.e. with a title of Administrator: Windows PowerShell), just type and enter cmd at the command prompt. This will change the commandline from PowerShell to Command.

          Similarly, to change back to PowerShell, type and enter powershell at the Command prompt.

      • #2171352 Reply
        Bundaburra
        AskWoody Plus

        The core of the problem could be that Windows.old folder.  This folder is created when a version  update is performed, e.g. from Win 10 1809 to Win 10 1903.  The purpose is to allow a quick and easy rollback to the previous version if you don’t like the new one.  As Zig suggested, run Windows Cleanup on drive C to delete Windows.old.  Not only will it remove the particular file, it will probably also free up a large amount of storage on the C drive.  You should find the cleanup utility at C:\Windows\system32\cleanmgr.exe.  You would need to run it as Administrator, and in the list of things it will show you to be deleted, ensure that Windows Update Cleanup is selected.  I suspect that after the cleanup has been run, all those “ghost” references will be no more.  Note – it could take a long time to run.

        Windows 10 Pro 64 bit 1909

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Bundaburra.
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2171354 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        As Zig suggested, run Windows Cleanup on drive C to delete Windows.old. Not only will it remove the particular file, it will probably also free up a large amount of storage on the C drive. You should find the cleanup utility at C:\Windows\system32\cleanmgr.exe.

        Thank you.

        Is this something I want to run a full backup first before doing? I have learned that with computers, you have to be crazy not to be paranoid.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2171494 Reply
          Morty
          AskWoody Plus

          OK, next step is to do a backup and then try the Windows Cleanup.

          Stay tuned……

      • #2171380 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Run “chkdsk” on the drive to make sure it’s OK.

        Right click on the drive in Explorer, Properties > Tools > Check.

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2171364 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Did the phantom files disappear after a reboot?

        Also did Check disk find anything file system errors?

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2171493 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        Run “chkdsk” on the drive to make sure it’s OK.

        I ran chkdsk and got these results:

        Log Name: Application
        Source: Chkdsk
        Date: 2/26/2020 7:27:21 AM
        Event ID: 26226
        Task Category: None
        Level: Information
        Keywords: Classic
        User: N/A
        Computer: MSDESKTOP
        Description:
        Chkdsk was executed in scan mode on a volume snapshot.

        Checking file system on C:

        Stage 1: Examining basic file system structure …
        579328 file records processed.

        File verification completed.
        10964 large file records processed.

        0 bad file records processed.

        Stage 2: Examining file name linkage …
        16082 reparse records processed.

        734162 index entries processed.

        Index verification completed.

        16082 reparse records processed.

        Stage 3: Examining security descriptors …
        Security descriptor verification completed.
        77418 data files processed.

        CHKDSK is verifying Usn Journal…
        33692352 USN bytes processed.

        Usn Journal verification completed.

        Windows has scanned the file system and found no problems.
        No further action is required.

        487715365 KB total disk space.
        315703372 KB in 447481 files.
        288968 KB in 77419 indexes.
        718769 KB in use by the system.
        65536 KB occupied by the log file.
        171004256 KB available on disk.

        4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
        121928841 total allocation units on disk.
        42751064 allocation units available on disk.

        ———————————————————————-

        Stage 1: Examining basic file system structure …

        Stage 2: Examining file name linkage …

        Stage 3: Examining security descriptors …

        Event Xml:
        <Event xmlns=”http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event”&gt;
        <System>
        <Provider Name=”Chkdsk” />
        <EventID Qualifiers=”0″>26226</EventID>
        <Level>4</Level>
        <Task>0</Task>
        <Keywords>0x80000000000000</Keywords>
        <TimeCreated SystemTime=”2020-02-26T12:27:21.575572400Z” />
        <EventRecordID>1237</EventRecordID>
        <Channel>Application</Channel>
        <Computer>MSDESKTOP</Computer>
        <Security />
        </System>
        <EventData>
        <Data>

        Checking file system on C:

        Stage 1: Examining basic file system structure …
        579328 file records processed.

        File verification completed.
        10964 large file records processed.

        0 bad file records processed.

        Stage 2: Examining file name linkage …
        16082 reparse records processed.

        734162 index entries processed.

        Index verification completed.

        16082 reparse records processed.

        Stage 3: Examining security descriptors …
        Security descriptor verification completed.
        77418 data files processed.

        CHKDSK is verifying Usn Journal…
        33692352 USN bytes processed.

        Usn Journal verification completed.

        Windows has scanned the file system and found no problems.
        No further action is required.

        487715365 KB total disk space.
        315703372 KB in 447481 files.
        288968 KB in 77419 indexes.
        718769 KB in use by the system.
        65536 KB occupied by the log file.
        171004256 KB available on disk.

        4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
        121928841 total allocation units on disk.
        42751064 allocation units available on disk.

        ———————————————————————-

        Stage 1: Examining basic file system structure …

        Stage 2: Examining file name linkage …

        Stage 3: Examining security descriptors …
        </Data>
        <Binary>00D708006A020800B1FC0E000000000080370000520700000000000000000000</Binary>
        </EventData>
        </Event>

      • #2171495 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Try this one to list the short names. You should be able to delete using the short names.

        dir  /x c:\users\Mordechai\Desktop\Rem*

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2171510 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        Try this one to list the short names. You should be able to delete using the short names. dir /x c:usersMordechaiDesktopRem*

        Here’s what I got:

        2020-02-26_10-43-23

        Attachments:
      • #2171515 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        If Disk Cleanup doesn’t do the trick, next thing I’d do is to try to delete the pesky file via a Linux live CD or live USB.

        Thank, but that water is too deep for me to swim in.

        • #2171538 Reply
          Cybertooth
          AskWoody Plus

          It’s not a deep dive.  🙂  In fact, if your computer has a DVD burner, it’s pretty easy.

          Download the Kubuntu Linux ISO from here. Then, using these instructions, burn the ISO to a blank DVD. Reboot the problem computer and let it boot into the DVD, selecting the option to try Kubuntu rather than the one to install it.

          You will reach a desktop that’s familiar to us from Windows, with the program launcher (like the Start menu) down in the left corner of the screen.

          The arrangement for this program launcher can vary, but you’ll be looking for Kubuntu’s file manager, which is called Dolphin, under the “System” category. You can also just type Dolphin in the search bar there and then click on the result. You will get a new window that looks much like the File Explorer in Windows 10 (called Windows Explorer in previous versions of Windows).

          In the Dolphin left panel, scroll down to the bottom to where its says “Devices” and find your Windows drive there, select it and then see if the problem file is listed. If it is, try to delete it the same way as you would in Windows, by selecting it and hitting the Delete key.

          This is all pretty straightforward, but give a holler if you need more details at any step along the way.

           

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #2171545 Reply
            Morty
            AskWoody Plus

            Cybertooth, you overestimate me.

            I’m big believer in leaving bad enough alone.

            All the best,

            Morty

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2171517 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Needs to be run in Command Prompt.

        In PowerShell it’s much more complicated – see here.

        cheers, Paul

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2171519 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        Needs to be run in Command Prompt.

        OK, I need Command Prompt for Dummies.

        How do I get to an Admin level Command prompt?

        Thank you.

        • #2171523 Reply
          access-mdb
          AskWoody MVP

          Click the Windows key, type cmd and right click on the Command Prompt app and select run as administrator.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2171524 Reply
          Rick Corbett
          AskWoody_MVP

          At the Admin level PowerShell command window, enter cmd at the prompt. This will leave the window elevated but running Command, not PowerShell.

          To revert back, enter powershell at the prompt.

          Hope this helps…

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2171526 Reply
          Cybertooth
          AskWoody Plus

          Hi Morty,

          From your Start menu or Search bar, type “cmd”. You should get a result that’s named something like “Command Prompt”. To run it as Administrator, right-click on that search result and in the resulting context menu select “Run as Administrator”. Then type in the desired commands.

          One other thing. I don’t know if it makes a difference, but in the PowerShell screenshot you posted, I noticed that there were two blank spaces (instead of one) between “dir” and “/x”. Make sure you type in just one blank space.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #2171529 Reply
            Morty
            AskWoody Plus

            To run it as Administrator

            Thanks.

            By hook or by crook, I got in. Then I ran it again, changing dir to del. Here’s what I got:

            cmd_2020-02-26_11-10-52

            Attachments:
            1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2171549 Reply
              Cybertooth
              AskWoody Plus

              This is so bizarre.

              At this point, all I can offer is to try to delete the file from outside your main Windows system, such as using the Linux live CD. If you have a Windows installation disk or a Windows system recovery disk, you can also try booting into that instead of Windows. You can probably also boot into the Windows 10 recovery environment, which will be a separate partition on the same physical drive as your Windows. The idea is to open a command prompt from said environment and see if you can delete the problem file from there.

              Another way (but which is more work) would be to remove the drive from your computer, connect it to a different PC, and try deleting the file there.

               

              1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #2171568 Reply
                Morty
                AskWoody Plus

                Somewhere between when I posted this question and the guidance from all the wonderful people trying to help me, I decided to just forget about it.

                Twenty years ago, I kept setting traps for a mouse under the cabinets in my kitchen. The mouse kept eating the bait and not triggering the trap.

                Finally, I covered some peanut butter with plastic and wrapped it around the lever. The next morning, I found the plastic next to the emptied, unsprung trap.

                I decided this was this smartest mouse in the world and made up my mind to keep it as a pet. The next morning, it got killed on the trap.

                I’ve decided to keep the file. Now watch it die on its own.

                Thank you to all of you. You’re an amazing bunch of friends, worth of Woody’s Rescue Corps. But I hereby give up the fight.

                Bless you all, Morty

                1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #2171907 Reply
                Paul T
                AskWoody MVP

                Nooo! Don’t give up.

                cheers, Paul

                1 user thanked author for this post.
            • #2171563 Reply
              Paul T
              AskWoody MVP

              Now you can try dir  /x c:\users\Mordechai\Desktop\Rem*

              cheers, Paul

              1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2171518 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Have you also had other problems with Explorer such as being unable to rename a file or a folder, or being unable to drag and drop a file from one folder to another?

        I ask because the symptom you described at the top of this thread, if accompanied by (some of) these other symptoms, looks similar to a Windows 8.1 (W8.1) problem which I have had once or twice a year following a monthly Windows Update.

        Apparently the same symptom(s) can also occur following a W10 update (or Vista update) as described at https://www.winhelponline.com/blog/error-rename-move-folders-windows-10/  .

        Note: The W8.1 fix at this link is still identical to that which I first downloaded from here in January 2017. I do not know if the W10 version is (still) valid for all versions of W10. If you decide to try it, I suggest that you make a system partition backup beforehand just in case.

        HTH. Garbo.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2171525 Reply
          Morty
          AskWoody Plus

          Have you also had other problems with Explorer such as being unable to rename a file or a folder, or being unable to drag and drop a file from one folder to another?

          Nope. No other problems that I’ve seen, thanks.

          • #2171947 Reply
            anonymous
            Guest

            I’ve temporarily replaced my usual W8.1 system drive with a temporary drive I use to look at W10 every few months. I have compared the 2 versions of the Registry key in the “w10_folder_descriptions.reg” file available at the link in my 1st post above with what I have “exported” using the Registry Editor from my up to date (to Jan 2020) W10 1909 Registry and there are many differences.

            From this I conclude that the files at the link above are probably now out of date (the most recent file is dated 13/11/17 for W10 1709). There have been several W10 versions since then. (This is a different scenario to the corresponding W8.1 Registry keys which have not changed at all since 2017. W8.1 has been stable in recent years. W10 is inherently unstable – hence the twice yearly re-installations.)

            So I no longer suggest trying these Registry key changes. Sorry for any confusion.

            HTH. Garbo.

            PS: My “chkdsk.exe /f /r” from a command prompt “run as administrator” suggestion remains 🙂

             

            1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2171569 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          It looks as though your PC has got into a state where part of Windows believes that the file exists, but other part(s) do not believe it exists to be able to delete it (or move it to the Recycle folder). The right hand not knowing what the left hand is doing!

          Have you tried running “chkdsk.exe /f /r” from a command prompt window “run as administrator”? For C: the PC will need to restart for this. In W10 unlike earlier versions, it does not give much information about what is happening, just a percentage completion number. The “chkdsk” command tidies up file inconsistancies so might help here (I’m no expert). Try deleting the file again afterwards.

          Failing that, my only other suggestion is, after making a backup to be able to restore if necessary, try the Registry fix from the link in my comment above anyway. (I think it needs a PC restart.) From the below the line comments at the link, it helped a number of people.

          HTH. Garbo.

      • #2171581 Reply
        WSRolandJS
        AskWoody Plus

        A little off-topic, but it would be good practice to NAME your C: drive (e.g., System) to avoid drive confusion in the future.

        Zig

        Actually for the purposes of backups and restores via external USB or DVD boots, having named normal partitions is a good idea, as drive letters are often “shuffled”.

        For example, I have S02[174]C and S02[174]D for my C partition and D partition respectively.  During restores especially, if I’m somewhat stressed and/or in a slight hurry,  I know exactly which partition is being acted upon or going to be acted upon.

        Of course, the only tie-in to this topic is:  if/whenever accidental un-intended major deletes happen, one can do a restore, if current backups on external media exist.

        "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin, revisted

        • This reply was modified 1 month ago by WSRolandJS.
      • #2171596 Reply
        Microfix
        Da Boss

        @Morty, have you tried renaming the file in question to something different and then run @Paul-T ‘s admin privs cmd prompts earlier in the thread substituting the old/new name in the commands?

        Win7 Pro x86/x64 | Win8.1 Pro x64 | Linux Hybrids x86/x64 |
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2171995 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        dir /x c:usersMordechaiDesktopRem*

        I got this:

        cmd_2020-02-27_09-20-19

        Attachments:
      • #2172001 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        @morty, have you tried renaming the file in question to something different

        Here’s what happened when I tried to rename it:

        explorer_2020-02-27_10-27-14

        Attachments:
      • #2172022 Reply
        Michael Austin
        AskWoody Plus

        Any suggestions?

        I appreciate that you’d already written that you opted to give up worrying about this. And I didn’t read the whole thread of other suggestions. But when I used to encounter problems like this in Windows 7 every so often, I found that changing the file’s Permissions so that my current admin user became its complete overlord worked 100% of the time. Sometimes it took two tries but it alway worked. It’s the equivalent of whacking the file’s Permissions with a stout rubber mallet to make it compliant as its overlord.

        If you wanted to try this you could see the file’s Permissions by drilling into its Properties and the Security tab in Windows Explorer.

        Finance, social and tech founder. My new, planet-wide talk show, Casual Saints, is being readied for a March/April 2020 debut.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2172024 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        It’s the equivalent of whacking the file’s Permissions with a stout rubber mallet to make it compliant as its overlord.

        Sounds a bit violent.

        I tried logging in as admin but had a hard time finding my user file. Maybe I should try again.

      • #2172037 Reply
        Michael Austin
        AskWoody Plus

        It’s the equivalent of whacking the file’s Permissions with a stout rubber mallet to make it compliant as its overlord.

        Sounds a bit violent.

        I tried logging in as admin but had a hard time finding my user file. Maybe I should try again.

        Is is mildly violent in computer terms. Just don’t fiddle with any other files and always have data back-ups. This philosophy is from someone (me) known to, and not above doing, long-ish search and destroy missions inside Windows Registry to rip traces and annoyances out by their roots, like unwanted weeds. On client boxes running Windows 3.1, 95, NT, 7 and even Windows Server. One does what works.

        Finance, social and tech founder. My new, planet-wide talk show, Casual Saints, is being readied for a March/April 2020 debut.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2172054 Reply
          Morty
          AskWoody Plus

          Thanks, but I found it less invasive to log in to the Admin account. Here’s what I got when I finally got into User/Mordechai and tried to delete the file:

          Annotation-2020-02-27-112938

          Attachments:
      • #2172070 Reply
        Michael Austin
        AskWoody Plus

        The fundamental need is that your operating system, in this case Windows, is telling you that the file is being coy or recalcitrant with it. That means Windows File Exploder and its basal processes have lost track of it. DOS will help you only if you’re lucky or clever with it. There are many possible strategies to solve this including Linux in an expert’s hands.

        This is the stage — if it were my file — at which I’d do a fast cost/benefit analysis on how much time I felt like investing on it. Because all the strategies I’ve learned came by trial, error and success. If it were my file I’d decide if I could move and hide it, or change the file extension, or anything and every thing creative that Microsoft would tell most users they shoudn’t attempt. That means that I don’t know how I’ll solve things until I actually have the mind set that I want to direct their solutions.

        That could include a live video support session with a smart, young student who came up as a hacker who could probably solve this for you for free. Even a middle-schooler or high-schooler you know and trust. I send you an attitude of play about this which might help you solve it quicker than anything else. And I now excuse myself from more suggestions.

        Finance, social and tech founder. My new, planet-wide talk show, Casual Saints, is being readied for a March/April 2020 debut.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2172075 Reply
        Morty
        AskWoody Plus

        I’d do a fast cost/benefit analysis on how much time I felt like investing on it.

        You just nailed it. This is long past ROI to RIP. Frankly, I’d have given up long ago if not for all the terrific people trying to help me. I’d feel like a guy telling the lifeguard, “No thanks, I’ll just stay here and see what happens.”

        But I just have to give it up now. So all I can say is thank you all.

        1009521

        Attachments:
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2172078 Reply
        bbearren
        AskWoody MVP

        First, right-click Recycle Bin and select “Empty Recycle Bin”.  Then if you open File Explore, and in the left pane expand C: drive, you’ll see

        Explorer-View

        Left-click on Recycle Bin in the left pane, and you’ll probably see something like this in the right pane

        Recycle-Bin

        In the right pane, left-click on the first numbered folder under Recycle Bin, then while holding down the Shift key, left-click on the bottom numbered folder.  That will highlight all those folders.  Now right-click anywhere in that highlighted area and select “Delete”.

        You’ll get a UAC prompt requiring Administrator permission to complete the action.  Acknowledge the UAC prompt with the Administrator password and click Yes.  You’ll get another popup asking if you’re sure you want permanently delete all those items.  There will be a checkbox below the Recycle Bin icon for “Do this for all current items”.  Left click that box, then click Yes.

        See if your phantom file still exists.

        Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
        "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns
        "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware

        Attachments:
        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2172097 Reply
        Paul T
        AskWoody MVP

        Maybe you have some hidden spaces in the name.
        Try these PowerShell commands to see what is going on.

        get-children c:\users\Mordechai\Desktop\Rem*
        get-children c:\users\Mordechai\Desktop\Rem* | select basename, extension
        $n = get-children c:\users\Mordechai\Desktop\Rem*
        $n.basename.length
        $n.extension.length

        You can copy the results straight off the screen and post them here.

        cheers, Paul

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