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  • Quickest way to get Windows 7 SP1 fully patched

    Home Forums AskWoody support Windows Windows 7 Windows 7 patches Quickest way to get Windows 7 SP1 fully patched

    • This topic has 46 replies, 13 voices, and was last updated 2 years ago.
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      • #114092 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Usually after you do a clean install, you install your drivers, your software, and then finally the updates.

        Windows 7 update scan takes forever. Like years. You leave and then 100 years later the updates are available, so you check them all off. They download and install which depending on your internet connection can take between 200-500 years. Then you reboot. But you’re not done. There are still updates to those updates. You do the same with those which take only a few decades this time. But you’re still not done, there’s still one or two more updates left.

        My point is, how can I Windows 7 SP1 fully up to date quicker? Usually with my 8.1 and 10 machines it’ll take me about 1 reboot to get all the updates where as 7 usually takes 3 or more. Is there a way to speed up this process? I know there’s the Convenience Rollup, but I’d rather not do that. Anyways thanks.

      • #114111 Reply
        PKCano
        Da Boss

        Download KB3020369, KB3138612, KB3177467 and KB3172605
        Do not connect to the Internet
        1.Install Win7 SP1
        2. Under “Change settings: Set Windows Update to “Never check for updates,” check “Give me recommended updates the same way I get important updates” and check “Give me updates for other MS Products.”
        3. Control Panel\Administrative Tools\Services – highlight the Windows Update Service, at the top left click “stop”
        4. Install KB3020369, KB3138612, KB3177467 and KB3172605 in that order. If you have to reboot, you will have to re-stop the Update Service.
        5. Reboot, connect to the Internet.
        6. In Windows Update, click “Check for updates”

        It should be fast. Update as yu normally would.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #117997 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          My recovery disks are for Win7. Would I be able to follow your instructions with the following modifications or are there other steps I must perform?

          – add KB976932 to the download list
          – install Win7
          – follow steps 2 and 3
          – add KB976932 to step 4 with KB976932 being installed first
          – follow steps 5 and 6

          • #118001 Reply
            PKCano
            Da Boss

            The topic title says Win7 SP1, so my instructions were based on that.
            Yes, offline, before the other standalone patches, you need to install SP1.

            I have a more detailed instruction on the sequence I use to install after connecting to the Internet. This is MY method (the way I do it) which is probably not how some of the others would advise. Check back here later today if you are interested and I will post it if I can find it.

            • #118012 Reply
              anonymous
              Guest

              Sorry for the slight detour. I was wanting to make sure that to get from Win7 to Win7 SP1 all I needed was to install KB976932, and that this could be done at the same time I would be following your Win7 SP1 patching instructions.

              I will check back later to see if you were able to find your more detailed instructions.

              Thanks!

        • #118011 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          This is MY method – not debatable wrong or right,  just MINE
          Following 1-6 above
          ONLINE:
          NOTE: Search for updates/UNCHECK all “important” updates following each install/reboot.
          NOTE: After each install/reboot, open Task Manager (right click on Taskbar) and wait for CPU usage to drop and stay below 10%.

          7. Search for updates.
          8. HIDE KB2952664, KB3021917, KB3022345, KB3062708, and KB3080149. UNCHECK any driver updates.
          9. Uncheck ALL “important” updates
          10. Check and install “Updates for Win7” (ONLY) dated 2013-2016. Reboot/wait/search.
          11. Repeat #8-9. Check and install KB2670838 Platform Update (it will be in “optionals”), IE11, and .NET 4.5.2 or 4.6.1. If there are any additional “Update for Win7,” check and install them. Reboot/wait/search.
          12. Repeat #8-9. Check and install any “Update for User-Mode Driver Framework”, Update for Kernel-Mode Driver Framework,” and “Update for ActiveX Killbits.” Reboot/wait/search.
          13. Repeat #8-9. Check and install “Security Updates for Win7” (ONLY) dated 2013-2016. Reboot/wait/search.
          14. Repeat #8-9. Check and install “Updates for MS .NET Framework” – whichever version you installed(ONLY). Reboot/wait/search.
          15. Repeat #8-9. Check and install “Security Updates for MS .NET” – whichever version you installed(ONLY). Reboot/wait/search.
          16. Repeat #8. UNCHECK any of the “Security Monthly Quality Rollups for Win7” that appear in the list and install everything that is checked by default. Reboot/wait/search. UNCHECK/DO NOT INSTALL any”Security Monthly Quality Rollups for Win7.”   Do this until there are no more checked updates.

          DECISION:
          Are you in Group A (accept everything MS gives you) or Group B (security-only)?

          Group A:
          Check and install any “Security Monthly Quality Rollups for Win7” that appear.

          Group B:
          Download the “Security only Quality Updates” and the latest “Cumulative Update for IE11” following the instructions in Step B2 in AKB2000003
          To manually install: Control Panel\Administrative Tools\Services and stop the Windows Update Service.
          Install, according to Step B2, in chronological order with the IE11 patch last. If you have a problem with the Jan 2017 patch, skip it.

          5 users thanked author for this post.
          • #125260 Reply
            kiwisolutionz
            AskWoody Lounger

            You make a lot of sense sensei! (as do many users here). Much appreciated PKCano 😉 So glad I stumbled across this website last year and I now look forward to my next clean install rebuild! Been waiting years for a successful procedure for W7 Ultimate x64. Absolutely love the platform regardless of how MS continually make it difficult for us to remain here. One question: the update KB2670838 Can I download the file & install via MS Catalog site; or do you recommend that I let the system updater do it’s thing au naturale & point the update file out to me? Excellent team work examples abound here. Have a good one all!

            If there is magic on this earth ... it's in the water.

            • #125269 Reply
              PKCano
              Da Boss

              KB2670838 should show as an unchecked patch in the “optional updates” list.
              This procedure was written before MS did a mass removal of superseded updates. I haven’t done a clean install since that time.
              Check the manual install patches here

              Quickest way to get Windows 7 SP1 fully patched


              If some of them are not available, they may have been superseded.

              Oh, and I wouldn’t install .NET 4.7 on Win7 yet. Give it 6 months. Install a older version in the meantime

      • #114113 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        Thanks.

      • #117363 Reply
        owdrtn
        AskWoody Lounger

        Download KB3020369, KB3138612, KB3177467 and KB3172605
        […]

        *confused* Ain’t 30220369 superseded by 3177467 as reported in MS Catalog (shown below).. To add to the confusion, the SP2 KB article still mention 3020369 as the prerequisite..
        SP2 Prerequisite KB Confusion (3020369 or 3177467 or both)

        • #117373 Reply
          Volume Z
          AskWoody Lounger

          True. You’re free to skip KB3020369. Also, you’re free to skip KB3172605 and even KB3177467. No more svchost.exe crisis is afflicting Windows Update. You may still want to make sure to run a current version of the Update Client (i.e. not outdated 7.6.7600.320). By installing KB3138612 you anticipate installation of the March 2016 Update Client (fully efficient) by Windows Update itself.

          Also, once the Monthly Rollup or the April Security-Only is installed, an even newer version of the Windows Update Client than included in KB3172605 will be present. Installation of KB3172605 is no longer mandatory, but optional. Probably recommended.

          Regards, VZ

          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #117542 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          There are reasons for my recommendations that may not be obvious.
          Windows Update went through a period of being “broken” for Win7 – searches took forever, each month we searched for and installed manually a “speedup patch.” With that in mind , here are my reasons for my procedure.

          The Windows Update Client packaged with the SP1 ISO/install CD is bad. The reason I recommended the installation of KB3020369 is to install a “good” Windows Update Client. Yes, there is a later WUC in the list, but remember, we have not connected to the Internet, so KB3020369 is still a prerequisite. The point is to start the rest of the updates with a “good” WCU

          In my experiemce (my last clean install was before the recent mass retirement) if you skip KB3138612 you will still be offered it later through WU.

          The WUC and servicing stack installations are necessary to avoid the search-forever problem when finally connecting to the Internet and using Windows Update.

          There are other reasons for my recommendation, but that should suffice.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #117727 Reply
            Volume Z
            AskWoody Lounger

            Downloading KB3020369, KB3138612, KB3177467 and KB3172605 is just too much.

            Out of KB3020369 and KB3177467, KB3020369 can always be skipped.

            Out of KB3138612 and KB3172605, one can always be skipped. As to which one to skip: Among equal ones you’ll want to skip the one with a prerequisite and bundled with other reliability stuff. That’s why I’m suggesting KB3138612, merely anticipating an immediate offer by Windows Update, which you’ve correctly stated.

            Regards, VZ

          • #118030 Reply
            Microfix
            AskWoody MVP

            I agree with PKCano’s method:

            In lamens terms, think of the Operating System (W7) as a building, if you omit some of the foundation blocks, the taller the building gets (with patches) the more likely it is to topple/crumble. These early patches are important in the structure of the OS which are improved upon over time but, need the initial patches to build on.

            Thanks PKCano

            | Win8.1 Pro x64 | Linux Hybrids x86/x64 | Win7 Pro x86/x64 Offline |
            1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #117968 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          @owdrtm @Volume-Z

          This from Susan BradleySHE is MY authority on patching. Windows Secrets Newsletter 5/23/2017

          I’ve been a bit amazed at how many administrators have not been as up to date as they should have been. Many that I’ve been helping trying to get the various updates installed do not have the necessary prerequisites installed. In order to install the MS17-010 updates, you must have certain updates installed before installing MS17-010 you must have the following updates installed as noted on the same site that helps users with the Windows 7 and 8.1 update slowness issue.

          • KB3020369 – Windows 7 Servicing stack update April 2015
          • KB3177467 – Windows 7 Servicing stack update September 2016
          • KB3172605 – Windows 7 July 2016 rollup
          • KB3021910 – Windows 8.1 Servicing stack update April 2015
          • KB3173424 – Windows 8.1 Servicing stack update July 2016
          • KB3172614 – Windows 8.1 July 2016 rollup

          If you do not have these updates installed, you will probably receive a message that the MS17-010 is not applicable to your system. Unlike Windows 10 where you can install any later update and there is no longer the mandate of prerequisites, Windows 7 and 8.1 has to have updates installed in a certain order.

          If you are attempting to update a computer to protect it from the WannaCry and are struggling to get your machine patched, I would honestly recommend manually going to Microsoft update and scan for updates. I would install any updates that are missing on the machine and are offered up that have the term “Security” in the title. It’s too dangerous to not be installing updates these days.

          • #117972 Reply
            radosuaf
            AskWoody Lounger

            Doesn’t the July rollup for 8.1 (KB3172614) contain KB3173424 already?

            MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Aorus Radeon RX 570 4GB * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 2004 64-bit
            • #117973 Reply
              PKCano
              Da Boss

              You are arguing with Susan Bradley?

              Because it has nothing to do with whether KB3172614 contain KB3173424 or not. It has to do with prerequisites and the supersedence chain (whether we mere mortals understand it or not).

              Edit to add qualification

              • #117975 Reply
                radosuaf
                AskWoody Lounger

                The text you cited:

                “you must have the following updates installed as noted on the same site that helps users with the Windows 7 and 8.1 update slowness issue”

                contradits the site she’s referring to that says:

                “It’s sufficient to install one of the Servicing Stack Updates.”

                MS states in the prerequisites section April 2015 stack is needed. I guess it’s enough to install either KB3021910 or KB3173424 (since it’s newer) and then KB3172614 or, if you want to follow MS guidance to the letter, first KB3021910 and then KB3172614.

                In my case I followed the MS way and WU worked.

                MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Aorus Radeon RX 570 4GB * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 2004 64-bit
      • #117978 Reply
        Volume Z
        AskWoody Lounger

        >KB3020369 – Windows 7 Servicing stack update April 2015

        >KB3177467 – Windows 7 Servicing stack update September 2016

        >KB3172605 – Windows 7 July 2016 rollup

        If you do not have these updates installed, you will probably receive a message that the MS17-010 is not applicable to your system.

        You do not believe yourself that all of KB3020369, KB3177467 and KB3172605 are a prerequisite to all of KB4012212,  KB4012215, KB4012218, KB4015549, KB4015552, KB4019264 and KB4019265.

        One of KB3020369 and KB3177467 is needed to install KB3172605 – in case KB3172605 is needed.

        When proceeding on a fresh Windows 7 installation as usual, KB3020369 is never even offered.

         

        • #117985 Reply
          PKCano
          Da Boss

          That was NOT my quote, it was a quote from Susan Bradley. Please see the top of that post.

          Also read that my instructions said to download it and install before connecting to the Internet, so there is no “:being offered” because it is not using WU.

          Edit to add information

          • #118198 Reply
            Volume Z
            AskWoody Lounger

            You introduced Susan Bradley for reference. If I want to quote her, I technically have no other way than quoting you. There is no point in introducing someone who ties MS17-010 to Servicing Stack Updates, July 2016 Update Rollup and June 2016 Update Client. It is plain wrong that “you will probably receive a message that the MS17-010 is not applicable to your system”.

            And she, too, is wrong at claiming KB3172605 has two prerequisites.

            Or claiming the pressing need for KB3172605 has not ended in mid January 2017.

            Has Microsoft (finally!) solved the Windows 7 slow-update problem?

             

      • #117981 Reply
        PKCano
        Da Boss

        “you must have the following updates installed as noted on the same site that helps users with the Windows 7 and 8.1 update slowness issue” contradits the site she’s referring to that says: “It’s sufficient to install one of the Servicing Stack Updates.”

        Screen-Shot-2017-05-24-at-8.46.39-AM

        Win7 – KB3020369, KB3177467, KB3172605
        Win8.1 – KB3021910, KB3173424, KB3172614
        This is the same as Susan Bradley’s list.
        My instructions were for Win7 SP1. I included an extra, KB3138612, but if you don’t install it initially, it will be offered by WU later.

        Attachments:
        2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #118004 Reply
          radosuaf
          AskWoody Lounger

          I made a slightly bigger screenshot:

          and added red box to emphasize the interesting part :).

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          1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #118094 Reply
          anonymous
          Guest

          Thank you PKCano,

          I have a question please:
          From those list of three on your post #117981,
          What happens if you already have the first and last
          installed – •KB3020369 – Windows 7 Servicing stack update April 2015
          installed – •KB3172605 – Windows 7 July 2016 rollup
          …but you don’t have the middle one installed yet
          •KB3177467 – •Windows 7 Servicing stack update September 2016
          ?
          Can I go ahead and now install KB3177467 after the fact and out of order?

          • #118098 Reply
            PKCano
            Da Boss

            Yes, install KB3177467. That is the latest servicing stack.

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #117988 Reply
        ch100
        AskWoody_MVP

        Guys, please listen to what @PKCano tells you.
        You have only partial info and understand the issues involved only in part.
        There are good reasons to install in that order and probably better to install KB2533552 before anything else to avoid even more questions for those installing clean.
        Do not expect Microsoft to fix stuff for those end users who install clean an OS from 2011 after 6 years as this is normally done only by professionals who know what they do and if they don’t, they have the tools required and Microsoft’s assistance to get the job done.
        Windows 8.1 has its own share of problems with installing KB2919355 if not installed in a specific order but Microsoft will not fix it after 3 years for the same reasons as above.
        In case you may wonder, the server equivalent versions have the same problems and don’t get fixed.

        4 users thanked author for this post.
        • #118003 Reply
          Noel Carboni
          AskWoody_MVP

          Win 7 is originally from 2009, actually. It makes your point even more strongly.

          -Noel

          2 users thanked author for this post.
        • #118024 Reply
          radosuaf
          AskWoody Lounger

          Windows 8.1 has its own share of problems with installing KB2919355 if not installed in a specific order but Microsoft will not fix it after 3 years for the same reasons as above.

          Current downloadable 8.1 ISO from MS site is dated Nov or Dec 2014 and has it already included.

          MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Aorus Radeon RX 570 4GB * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 2004 64-bit
          2 users thanked author for this post.
          • #118049 Reply
            ch100
            AskWoody_MVP

            Not everyone use ISO with Update 3 KB3000850 including KB2919355 or know about that image.
            You will see this question coming up now and then even in forums addressing professionals mostly in relation to Windows 2012 R2 when the image used is the Gold (RTM) image.
            What I find interesting is that ISO with U3 contains an older version of KB2976978 which cannot be removed and as such becomes de-facto part of the Operating System, but almost everyone here seems to understand exactly which patches are undesirable and how an Operating System is designed.

            • #118081 Reply
              radosuaf
              AskWoody Lounger

              almost everyone here seems to understand exactly … how an Operating System is designed.

              I think even MS are not sure about that :). At least it seems so…

              MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Aorus Radeon RX 570 4GB * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 2004 64-bit
              1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #118086 Reply
                ch100
                AskWoody_MVP

                It is useful for the billions of Windows users that you know better, sorry but you were asking for it 🙂

              • #118089 Reply
                radosuaf
                AskWoody Lounger

                I don’t see your point, really. I was referring to MS documentation clearly stating which prerequisites are needed to install July 2016 rollup when using the latest image (ONE, not two), then to the other site that mentions CLEARLY only ONE of the servicing stack updates is needed, but obviously you didn’t care to read both, instead tried to insult me (not successfully, I might add).

                Sorry, but you were asking for it.

                Once again, links for your reference:

                https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/3172614/july-2016-update-rollup-for-windows-8.1-and-windows-server-2012-r2
                http://wu.krelay.de/en/

                I have no idea what is the point of installing KB3173424 on top of KB3021910, but feel free to enlighten me.

                MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Aorus Radeon RX 570 4GB * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 2004 64-bit
              • #118093 Reply
                ch100
                AskWoody_MVP

                @radosuaf
                I consider you as one of the “good” posters, an “insider” if you like this word, which seems to be in fashion, someone who deeply understands the issues involved, but sometimes you seem to be too negative in expressing your views.
                This was my point, otherwise I was not trying to offend you. 🙂

                Microsoft’s implementation of CBS has its quirks and to avoid useless comments from people with limited understanding of the bugs who tend to attribute them to conspiracy theories, sometimes it is more practical to advise to install older updates in the order of their release just to have all parts involved content and pleased with the outcome. The details discussed here are fully understood on this forum only by @abbodi86 and to a large extent by @PKCano, @MrBrian and myself and possible few other posters who are not MVPs, @NetDef is the first who I would nominate for this purpose. There are other forums who have more people understanding fully the problems, but I will not advertise them here.
                Please see my replies in this context.

                1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #118099 Reply
                radosuaf
                AskWoody Lounger

                Fair enough :). Maybe I got carried away a bit…

                Nevertheless, my limited experience would suggest that there’s no need to install both stacks. I installed only the April 2015 one on top of the clean 8.1 U3 install and I had no issues at all with Windows Update.

                MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Aorus Radeon RX 570 4GB * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 2004 64-bit
                1 user thanked author for this post.
              • #118107 Reply
                Noel Carboni
                AskWoody_MVP

                …my limited experience…

                I was thinking about what ch100 said above about few understanding the Windows servicing model in depth, and it rings true. My own experience is quite limited lately in this regard.

                I’ve had only a very few occasions to install Windows. Last clean install on hardware, besides fooling with my Win 10 virtual machine, was back in April 2015 when I got a new Dell PowerEdge.

                I’ve put so much emphasis on operating Windows in a sustainable way long-term without degradation that I’ve actually ended up with VERY limited experience with installs. It feels like a good thing, but it does keep me from gaining personal experience in installing the OS and reinstalling and bringing things up to date all at once.

                There was a time (in the era of XP) where I was involved with corporate work and I had a lot more experience with maintaining groups of Windows machines. That ended when I started my own business, and now my systems seem to “just work” for years on end and I’ve avoided doing installs like the plague. I just thought back to all my Windows installs over the past 13 years…

                • I fresh installed XP x64 in 2004 on a Dell Precision 470 workstation.
                • I fresh installed Vista x64 in 2007 onto the Precision 470.
                • In 2008 I restored a System Image backup of Vista x64 from the Precision 470 onto a Dell Precision 490. That booted right up and had me on my familiar well-tuned Vista system in a few hours.
                • In 2009 I fresh installed the new release of Windows 7 x64 on the Precision 490.
                • In 2012 I restored a Win 7 System Image backup of Win 7 from the Precision 490 onto a Dell Precision T5400
                • In 2013 I moved the C: drive disks from the T5400 into a Dell Precision T5500.
                • In 2013 I fresh installed Windows 8.1 Update 1 onto the Precision T5500, and that install is still what I’m running today.
                • In 2015 I bought a new Dell PowerEdge and fresh installed Windows 7 on it.

                Take away the restorals of backups and the moving of disks and I’ve only ever fresh installed XP x64, Vista, and Windows 8.1 once each, and Windows 7 twice.

                The above list doesn’t show any of my experience with VMs, but even there I’ve done few installs; mostly I just keep the VMs working – easy through the use of Snapshots. There are of course the ongoing installs of new Win 10 versions. So far I’ve gotten away with doing the in-place upgrades then re-tweaking the results, which is less intensive than a full, fresh install.

                I suggest to those who feel the need to reinstall the OS from time to time that perhaps there are things they could do better in running it that would keep their current installation safe and sound, so as to avoid the issue entirely. A couple of days less time spent getting a new Windows installation up to snuff are handy to have for other things. 🙂

                -Noel

                2 users thanked author for this post.
              • #118109 Reply
                radosuaf
                AskWoody Lounger

                Ahhhh, my tendency is to clean reinstall as it is bound to clean out all the problems and it does not take that much time after all when you use a SSD. I keep all my libraries (photos, music, documents, games etc.) out of the system SSD and try not to keep anything significant on the Desktop. So it’s actually just:

                a/ installing Windows (with SSD format) + updates + drivers

                b/ installing Firefox + Thunderbird

                c/ installing Word + Excel

                d/ installing Steam + Origin clients and pointing them to HDD where all games are stored

                That’s basically it – somehow I’ve never trusted restore points, in-place upgrades etc. when it comes to Windows. And I tried to keep them clean, so reinstallation is quite quick. Same goes for Windows Mobile. I’ve hard resetted many, many times.

                On the other hand, my Android phone is a bit cluttered and I usually do a clean, neat install when I buy a new phone, then it gets more and more messed up but I try to avoid any restores or reinstalls like a plague, because I’m quite certain I’ll lose something in the process.

                MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Aorus Radeon RX 570 4GB * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 2004 64-bit
              • #118205 Reply
                ch100
                AskWoody_MVP

                @radosuaf The catch up with old updates sometimes cause problems for other users as it was posted here, unless following a specific sequence when updating.
                A possible solution would be to have a good clean installation patched correctly and with enough patience to a certain date and getting an image of that installation to be reinstalled later, rather than starting with Update 3 ISO, released in December 2014, in your case.
                Update 3 ISO image is likely not to cause major updating problems, but older images are known to cause issues and as I said in a previous post, the Windows 8.1/Gold image needs to be updated in a specific sequence until it gets to a certain point, which generally speaking is that one from Update 3 ISO.
                Even if this is not so critical for you, the procedure presented here may assist other users.

              • #118223 Reply
                radosuaf
                AskWoody Lounger

                as I said in a previous post, the Windows 8.1/Gold image needs to be updated in a specific sequence until it gets to a certain point

                I’m not questioning that – just noting that sometimes it’s easier to reinstall clean than to fight with your current installation, especially when settings for many programs (Firefox comes to mind) you can keep now in the cloud (yeah, I know, due to privacy issues it’s not advised). If you have a good image ready, it’s usually just applying it and running WU.

                MSI H110 PC MATE * Intel Core i5-6402P * 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2133 MHz * Aorus Radeon RX 570 4GB * Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD * Western Digital Blue 1TB HDD * Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD * DVD RW Lite-ON iHAS 124 * Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer PCI * Windows 10 Pro 2004 64-bit
            • #118237 Reply
              AlexEiffel
              AskWoody_MVP

              I am like Noel, not much experience reinstalling as I keep my stations clean for years and for others, I am not the one reinstalling. One thing I like to do is save a clean image after tweaks for a station, so if someone breaks his computer, it is easy to not have the long process of customization done again. I would simply have the person restore the image, then patch everything. I didn’t see the need nor found it practical to recreate new images after initial install.

              It would work quite well even after years, but now I am worried with Windows 10 that it might not work. Suppose I have someone who installed 1607 and we saved the image after customization. After 3 years, we are on 1911 and I restore the image from 1607. Will the system be able to update properly since 1607 won’t be supported no more and Microsoft will have to keep track of all those different versions and different upgrade paths from one to another? This looks to me like a potential disaster for everyone that uses an imaging tool and then tries to hop from one version of Windows 10 to one several ones later.

              On a related note to this thread for group B users, I stumbled on this post to easily see if a particular update has been installed:

              WSUS reporting with PowerShell

      • #126031 Reply
        anonymous
        Guest

        KB2976978 can be removed from Windows 8.1 U3 ISO (with KB3000850, from ~Nov 2014).

        Hard to explain, when it doesn’t let you uninstall it, uninstall it anyway.

      • #177819 Reply
        mj114
        AskWoody Lounger

        Download KB3020369, KB3138612, KB3177467 and KB3172605 Do not connect to the Internet 1.Install Win7 SP1 2. Under “Change settings: Set Windows Update to “Never check for updates,” check “Give me recommended updates the same way I get important updates” and check “Give me updates for other MS Products.” 3. Control Panel\Administrative Tools\Services – highlight the Windows Update Service, at the top left click “stop” 4. Install KB3020369, KB3138612, KB3177467 and KB3172605 in that order. If you have to reboot, you will have to re-stop the Update Service. 5. Reboot, connect to the Internet. 6. In Windows Update, click “Check for updates” It should be fast. Update as yu normally would.

        Download KB3020369, KB3138612, KB3177467 and KB3172605 Do not connect to the Internet 1.Install Win7 SP1 2. Under “Change settings: Set Windows Update to “Never check for updates,” check “Give me recommended updates the same way I get important updates” and check “Give me updates for other MS Products.” 3. Control Panel\Administrative Tools\Services – highlight the Windows Update Service, at the top left click “stop” 4. Install KB3020369, KB3138612, KB3177467 and KB3172605 in that order. If you have to reboot, you will have to re-stop the Update Service. 5. Reboot, connect to the Internet. 6. In Windows Update, click “Check for updates” It should be fast. Update as yu normally would.

        Hi, new here.  I am updating an old computer that is running Windows 7 Pro and I need to install, not only a lot of updates and patches, but SP-1.   The SP-1 in WU is not what it purports to be and is only about 15mb.  I tried to install it last week from WU but the computer does not show that it has SP-1, and it downloaded something else, so I did a system restore and now need to get the real thing.   So I went to MS and looked for the manual version.   I found what I think it is, but there are several files listed that would need to be installed. And it says it is not for a single computer.  I plan to follow your method for updating the computer, but I am not sure how to get the correct service pack for it.  I would like to download the items you mention above to a thumb drive as well as the correct service pack and then install them from that.  Can you point me in the right direction and let me know which items I need to download and where they are?  Many thanks.

        PS – if this information is somewhere else on this site I apologize for repeating the question, I searched but couldn’t find this particular problem.

        • #178016 Reply
          Elly
          AskWoody MVP
          Per PKCano:
          Win7 SP1 is KB 976932 – it is going to be LARGE.

          User needs to look under Windows Update page at “installed updates” and see it it is already installed.

          Another way to check is Start Menu – on the right right-click on link “Computer” and choose Properties. This takes you to the “System” and at the top it will say SP1 if it is installed.

          Here are the MS pages – Instructions and the download page.

          https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/15090/windows-7-install-service-pack-1-sp1

          https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=5842

          Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

          • #178061 Reply
            mj114
            AskWoody Lounger

            Thanks Elly – I appreciate it.  I am pretty sure the small update did nothing, and I don’t have SP-1 installed.  I have checked both ways.  As I said, I will be following PKCano instructions.  When you click on the download SP-1 for win7 64 bit you get 10 files and KB 976932 is one of them.  There are symbols files etc. That is what I was asking about, but I found an answer on the website that said I only needed the one file and that the symbol files were only necessary if I ran into trouble. So, I will give this a shot.   Thanks for your help

            1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #177821 Reply
        mj114
        AskWoody Lounger

        oops forgot to mention the computer is a 64bit

      • #201475 Reply
        AlexEiffel
        AskWoody_MVP

        Maybe Microsoft changed something, because I just installed Windows 7, then SP1, then it told me I had to update Windows update or right before SP1, which I did. Then I got about 126 updates and all went well, not much delay, no update that gave an error or didn’t install. That’s much better than what I have seen before.

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