• Recycling my e-waste

    Author
    Topic
    #2456897

    After the upgrade of my dual boot daily driver was completed, I was left with some potential e-waste. Then I remembered that my son had planned a DIY a year or two ago but didn’t get any farther than buying a Thermaltake Urban S31 mid-tower case. I now had an unused motherboard/CPU/mSATA 250GB SSD and 16GB RAM, as well as a 250GB SATA SSD. I also had an LG E2360 monitor sitting unused on a shelf.

    So I bought a PSU, and put my e-waste to good use in a new mid-tower case (which came with two installed 120mm cooling fans). When I retired in 2019, my Dell Latitude E5420 pretty much retired as well, and when my son’s Alienware PC went belly up, I setup my laptop for him to use. It had been dual boot, but he didn’t want or need that, so after creating a full drive image first, I re-configured the partitioning and software for single OS, using the A side. As a result, I had an unused Windows 10 installation stored in a drive image.

    After getting everything installed in the mid-tower (which has a 2.5″/3.5″ drive dock in the top), I plugged the HDD containing my E5420 complete drive image into the drive dock and booted my TBWinRE USB drive. I restored the dual boot configuration to the mSATA drive, then shut down and rebooted into my BootIt UEFI USB drive to do some partitioning surgery.

    I got rid of the A side OS partition that was still in use on the E5420, and made the unused B side the primary OS. I did some partition deleting/sliding and such on the mSATA OS drive, and also wiped the 250GB SATA SSD and created a single partition on it for the Windows Users folder. After getting all of that in order (which also involved a couple of pooches and restarts by restoring that original full drive image again and then creating fresh drive images at each level of success), I finally booted into Windows 10 2004. The PC was still offline, as I had some tidying up to do.

    I moved all the User folders with a Location tab in their Properties to the 250GB SATA SSD (now drive D:) Users folder, and also created a folder for future drive images of the OS drive. Since the B side of the E5420 was already configured, (fixed size pagefile and such) I didn’t have any tweaking to do there (other than using the Users folders’ Location tabs).

    After getting all of that set up and test-booted several times, I went online. Windows immediately Activated, then wanted to upgrade to 21H2, which carried on quite smoothly with no hiccups. I also upgraded Image for Windows to the latest version (a home use license is good for installation on 5 PC’s). Now my son has a mid-tower, I have my laptop back, and some e-waste wasn’t wasted after all.

    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
    We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do. We don't all have to do the same things.

    Viewing 2 reply threads
    Author
    Replies
    • #2456902

      It is good you were able to “repurpose” your old electronics. That keeps that “hazardous waste” out of our landfills, oceans, and water supplies, and the stomachs of wildlife – at least for a little while.

      But eventually they too will die or become obsolete. It cannot just sit in your closet or on a store room shelf indefinitely. So when the time comes, do NOT just throw it in the trash. Research your local area for electronics recycling centers. Some retail outlets recycle products. Best Buy, by far, offers the best recycling services. Staples and Office Depot are okay. Sadly, Amazon and Walmart – who sell the most, offer little, if any recycling options.

      Many auto-parts and battery stores will recycle old batteries – particularly old sealed lead-acid batteries as found in UPS.

      Beyond that there may be an actual recycling center in your area. One in mine actually paid me $80 for the scrap value of the steel and aluminum, and the precious metals as found in processors and RAM modules. But more importantly, they recycled or destroyed the rest in an environmentally friendly, and EPA approved way. That $80 paid for a carpet remnant and a couple gallons of paint to turn my old electronics store room into a spare bedroom. 🙂

      Check your local Goodwill and Salvation Army donation centers too. Some accept old electronics and some will “wipe” your old hard drives for you. Some even will come and pick it up – if you have other useful household goods they can use too.

      The recycling center I went to even had a hard drive shredder, similar to this hard drive shredder – so no worries about any of your personal information or files getting into the wrong hands! 🙂 Plus it was just plain fun to watch. 🙂

      Anyway, old electronics needs to be properly recycled. Please don’t toss it in the trash.

       

      Bill (AFE7Ret)
      Freedom isn't free!

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2456908

        Anyway, old electronics needs to be properly recycled. Please don’t toss it in the trash.

        I’m well aware, thanks.  My county landfill has provisions for hazardous waste as well as e-waste.  Plus, as you point out, there are some commercial recyclers of e-waste in my area as well.

        Create a fresh drive image before making system changes/Windows updates, in case you need to start over!
        We all have our own reasons for doing the things that we do. We don't all have to do the same things.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2456905

      Recycling e-waste has been law in the EU for years.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waste_Electrical_and_Electronic_Equipment_Directive

      cheers, Paul

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2456912

      People have different needs.  But it should be kept in mind that a typical laptop uses around 25 watts, another 25 for an external monitor.  A typical desktop can use 100 watts, but an older one or an unusual one can use 250 watts or more.  Using a laptop plugged into a monitor as a desktop replacement, if that is powerful enough for your needs, can then save around 200 watts.  If the computers were left on 24/7 – not ideal for most, but some people do this for convenience or server activity – those 200 watts could cost $260 a year at 15 cents per kwh.

      This also means that turning on automatic sleep or hibernate for a desktop could also save those $260 if you go from always on to almost always off.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    Viewing 2 reply threads
    Reply To: Recycling my e-waste

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use all available BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

    Your information: