• Removing Copilot

    Author
    Topic
    #2606203

    by downloading our Registry file to block Windows Copilot or by using our Group Policy files:

    Hi Susan, please clarify the instructions. The first link gives: “Not Found–Sorry, but you are looking for something that is not here.”

    The 2nd and 3rd links provided downloads, but what do we do with them and how do these downloaded files relate to the instructions that follow?

    Also, do we do this before or after the current Windows update?

    Thanks, cma

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    Viewing 9 reply threads
    Author
    Replies
    • #2606230

      https://www.askwoody.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/09/DisableWindowscopilot.reg

      Try that link.

      The ADMX and AMDL are for firms with domain settings.  If you are a standalone user you can skip them.

       

      Susan Bradley Patch Lady/Prudent patcher

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #2606616

        Hi Susan, before doing the latest Win 10 download, I successfully ran your reg file to remove Copilot. How do we know if we have actually removed it?

        Thanks, CMA

        • #2606626

          It hasn’t been installed yet. But…
          You can’t remove it. You can’t uninstall it.
          You can only disable it. That’s what the Reg file will do when it is installed. Possibly with the Dec. update. You are being proactive.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2606850

      Would someone please explain why we would want to disable Copilot?  Can we just ignore it?  Is it going to be intrusive?

      • #2607091

        Would someone please explain why we would want to disable Copilot?

        Some people don’t like being given access to a free, useful tool because they didn’t ask for it.

        Can we just ignore it?

        Yes.

        Is it going to be intrusive?

        No.

        If you don’t want Copilot on your taskbar you can turn it off at Settings, Personalization, Taskbar (and still access it via WIN + C to try it out).

    • #2606891

      Is it going to be intrusive?

      The way it is build into OS (just like Edge) and blocked from Uninstalling is intrusive enough. Why do we need more code that we don’t want ?

      * Tiny11 comes without Edge, Copilot…

    • #2606937

      We likely don’t ‘need’ it but…

      • Inquiring minds want to know.
      • Like many here, I am the recipient of IT help calls from friends and family.  I know that I will will not have any use for it but I want to have a clue about for when I’m asked.
    • #2607028

      the KB5032278 preview update has been released this THU 11/30 (late afternoon pacific local time) which has that Copilot feature:

      New! This update adds the Copilot in Windows (in preview) button to the right side of the taskbar. This only applies to devices that run Home or Pro editions (non-managed business devices). When you select it, Copilot in Windows appears at the right on your screen. It will not overlap with desktop content or block open app windows. This is available to a small audience initially and deploys more broadly in the months that follow.

      so use whatever means necessary to disable it (or not install this preview update)

    • #2607095

      Some people don’t like being given access to a free, useful tool because they didn’t ask for it.

      Free like shoved into your throat ?
      Useful tool ? Who had decided the Copilot is useful ?
      I don’t see its usefulness to me.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #2607100

        Some people don’t like being given access to a free, useful tool because they didn’t ask for it.

        Free like shoved into your throat ?
        Useful tool ? Who had decided the Copilot is useful ?
        I don’t see its usefulness to me.

        No, free like made available should you wish you try it.

        PC magazine found it to be very useful:

        Of course, many Windows users will want to stick with the old way of doing things: Fire up a web browser, navigate to a search site, enter keywords, and pore over the results. But they’ll be missing out on not only more immediate answers but also on the ability to create text and images. Microsoft Copilot is a terrific research assistant, and like Bing AI Chat, it shows links to its sources so you can confirm its results.

        In less than a day with Copilot, I find myself frequently turning to it for answers such as, “When did Windows 11 get full-screen widgets.” The feature will be a boon to students and anyone who needs to compose text or create images, both of which it excels at.

        Should You Use Microsoft Copilot?

        What have you tried to do with it?

        • #2607119

          I understand and agree with the sentiments of “Don’t force an app on me, let me choose” and “Let me remove or disable a feature or app that I don’t like or don’t want” so I understand where @Alex5723 is coming from.  I’m still curious though, even though I don’t want it and will never use it beyond testing to satisfy my curiosity.  It sounds like playing with it, and then removing or disabling it from within the OS, will not be an option so deciding whether proactively block it is a decision to be made soon.

          1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2607126

      It’s all about choice isn’t it? Or in fact it’s all about the LACK of choice

      It may well be a wonderful feature, for people who find it wonderful. I’m sure some people thought that Cortana was wonderful. Most of us turned that feature off without even bothering to fire it up, because we knew it wouldn’t be helpful to us personally (and also, because we were pretty sure that everything we said to it would get fed back into the endless cycle of personal data mining for fun and profit) (ditto CoPilot)

      The main point though is that here’s another feature being foisted on us that we didn’t ask for, don’t want, and don’t have any choice over, apart from being able to hide it away in a dark corner of our hard drive and hope it never gets out. Even then they haven’t had the good manners to give us a simple “off” switch, we have to faff around editing the Registry or Group Policy

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2610093

      My PC runs Windows 10 pro 22H2. I do not want Copilot so following Susan’s advice I downloaded the adml and admx files. However, in her latest newsletter she states it is not advisable to do so, but to await MS to deliver the udate first.

      How can I now remove those files without causing other problems? Just deleting them throws multiple errors in the group policy editor.

       

      • #2610106

        Open Group Police Editor (type gpedit in the searchbar and press Enter).
        The Editor is a tree that works like File Explorer.
        Navigate to Local Computer Policy -> User Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Windows Copilot
        In the right pane, double click on “Turn off Windows Copilot
        In the box that pops up, click on “Not Configured” the “Apply” then “OK”

        Close the Group Policy Editor and reboot.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        • #2610333

          Thank you for your post. That has solved my problem.

           

           

        • #2610435

          Navigate to Local Computer Policy -> User Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Windows Copilot
          In the right pane, double click on “Turn off Windows Copilot”
          In the box that pops up, click on “Not Configured” the “Apply” then “OK”

          Close the Group Policy Editor and reboot.

          That would enable Copilot:

          Blocking copilot in the operating system

          User Configuration then Administrative Templates then Windows Components then Windows Copilot
          Double-click the “Turn off Windows Copilot” policy.
          Select Enabled option.

          • #2610437

            How can I now remove those files without causing other problems? Just deleting them throws multiple errors in the group policy editor.

            That would enable Copilot:

            Yes, it would enable Copilot. He wanted to remove the .admx and .adml files.
            “Not configured” will be the default when the Dec updates add the .admx/.adml files back.
            That’s what it will be when he updates.

            • #2610652

              Navigate to Local Computer Policy -> User Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Windows Copilot
              In the right pane, double click on “Turn off Windows Copilot”
              In the box that pops up, click on “Not Configured” the “Apply” then “OK”

              Close the Group Policy Editor and reboot.

              That would enable Copilot:

              Blocking copilot in the operating system

              User Configuration then Administrative Templates then Windows Components then Windows Copilot
              Double-click the “Turn off Windows Copilot” policy.
              Select Enabled option.

              How can I now remove those files without causing other problems? Just deleting them throws multiple errors in the group policy editor.

              That would enable Copilot:

              Yes, it would enable Copilot. He wanted to remove the .admx and .adml files.
              “Not configured” will be the default when the Dec updates add the .admx/.adml files back.
              That’s what it will be when he updates.

              Changing the Copilot line in the group editor to “not configured” enabled me to delete the adml and admx files from the policy definitions folder without creating an error.

               

    • #2610396

      Open Group Police Editor (type gpedit in the searchbar and press Enter).
      The Editor is a tree that works like File Explorer.
      Navigate to Local Computer Policy -> User Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Windows Copilot
      In the right pane, double click on “Turn off Windows Copilot
      In the box that pops up, click on “Not Configured” the “Apply” then “OK”

      Close the Group Policy Editor and reboot.

      For me typing gpedit opens MS Edge with a search of that term. I have the search bar in my taskbar. I”ve tried typing Run first and typing it in that Window too which generates an error.

      This is running Win 10 22H2 home version.

    • #2610398

      typing gpedit opens MS Edge with a search

      Type gpedit.msc and wait a couple of seconds.

    Viewing 9 reply threads
    Reply To: Removing Copilot

    You can use BBCodes to format your content.
    Your account can't use all available BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

    Your information: